IUP Brand: Visual Guide

  • Our goal is to create and protect a unified voice of the university in everything we do—all of us across the IUP community. That extends to the way we represent IUP visually. Beyond the IUP logo, we have set a number of graphic identity standards designed to achieve that consistency.

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    The IUP Logo

    Never underestimate the power of our university logo. It a consistent reminder of the core values we all share and sets the stage for all messaging and communication that follows.

    IUP “block” logoThe consistent and proper use of the iconic IUP “block” logo strengthens our recognition and should be used to maximize our visibility while maintaining a unified and identifiable look.

    No more wave. No more soaring hawk. This logo replaces all previous institutional logos as the preferred graphic identifier. We use it to represent the academic and administrative programs of IUP.

    How to Apply the IUP Logo

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    When color is an option, the logo should always appear in IUP PMS 201 C Crimson, or the approved equivalent for web or process color.

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    When rendering the logo on IUP Crimson, it must be white.

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    Always leave a clear area equal to the width of the “I” around the logo. No text, images, edges, or other elements should overlap this border.

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    When color printing isn’t an option, the logo must appear in black, not a tonal gray.

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    When rendering the logo on a colored field that is NOT IUP Crimson, it must be white.

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    The logo should always appear at a legible size. Never go below a height of 25px for digital applications or 1/4” in print applications. Consider if the scale of the logo will present issues with legibility and crispness for other applications (e.g. signage).

    Combining the Logo with IUP or Department Name

    In some cases, our logo needs to be in a “lockup” with the full university name or a departmental name. Our first goal is always finding ways in which the logo can stand for itself—think big brand first. When that is not possible, please contact our brand management team to receive a version with an attached wordmark.

    The IUP Seal

    IUP SealIt’s our ace in the hole. The IUP seal is the most formal of IUP’s graphic identifiers and is generally reserved for use in similarly formal and official documents. That includes the following. 

    • Diplomas

    • Awards

    • Certificates

    • Medals

    • Contracts

    • Class rings

    Do not use the seal unless working directly with our division on one of the above or a similar use. Using older versions of the seal or parts of any version is never permitted.

    IUP Athletics Logos

    Athletic hawks logo We get it—the hawk looks awesome. But, given the importance of the university logo, we cannot confuse our academic and athletics marks. 

    These logos are to be used only for Athletics Department teams and programs, including varsity athletics teams, club sports, and associated programs. Any other use is prohibited without the express permission of the Marketing and Communications Division.

    The IUP Colors

    Our core colors are crimson and gray. That won’t change anytime soon. Any work for the university should start there. Black and white are key components to the IUP brand, too. The brand color palette also includes two accent colors. You'll find them displayed below, but we discourage you from trying to implement them on your own. They're tricky and require the touch of a professional designer.

    To make sure that our colors are displayed accurately in all channels, you can use the codes below for help. Quick tip: CMYK is best for print, while RGB is best for digital channels.

    IUP Crimson

    PMS: 201.C

    CMYK: 0, 100, 63, 29

    RBG: 158, 27, 50

    HEX:#9e1b23

    IUP Gray

    PMS: 179-12

    CMYK: 63, 55, 54, 28

    RGB: 90, 90, 90

    HEX: #5a5a5a

    Gradient Treatment

    Yellow

    PMS: N/A

    CMYK: 8, 29, 100, 0

    RGB: 236, 181, 27

    HEX: #ecb51b

    Typography and Fonts

    The IUP brand uses two typefaces—Minotaur Sans by Production Type and Prospectus Pro by Lost Type.

    • Minotaur is a bold balance between modern and classic sans, with a slightly rough contour.

    • Prospectus Pro has a classic academic look, but with a sharp, modern edge.

    Minotaur is primarily used for headlines, while Prospectus Pro is recommended for body copy, pull quotes, and smaller eyebrow treatments. Although both of these font families have more styles, please use only the specific front types specified below.

    How to Use Minotaur Sans

    Minotaur Sans is used in two weights: Bold and Regular. Both styles should be set in all uppercase, unless the text is very long and unreadable. Title case text can be used in this instance.

    How to use Prospectus Pro S

    Prospectus Pro S uses three styles: Regular, Italic, and Light. The italic style is only meant for use in body copy, never for singular or large applications.

    Fonts for IUP Seal, Wordmark, and University Subunits

    Wordmarks that are in “lockup” with the IUP logo do not use Minotaur Sans or Prospectus Pro S. Please contact our brand management team for help with these elements.

    Other Graphic Elements

    Beyond the basics, our designers also use a number of other graphic elements to make IUP marketing messages stand out. The below elements are for reference only. Please connect with our brand management team for help with materials that require these elements.

    Gradient

    In our materials, you will sometimes find an orange-magenta-yellow gradient. We use it to highlight text, color an image, or fill smaller vector elements. It should never be a background or large field of color.

    White Space

    Sometimes, choosing not to employ some of our graphic elements is a powerful design decision. Negative space (as well as the presence of the color white) creates designs that don’t feel overwhelming, busy, and hard to discern.

    Growth Patterns

    Organic growth patterns that resemble tree rings and concentric rectangles suggest growth and activation. You’ll find them as subtle additions to add texture, depth, and direction. They never enter the foreground or dominate the design.

    Wood Texture

    Used to embellish imagery, frame content, and create background texture.

    Iconography

    We use a consistent set of icons that are geometric, simple, and monoweight. You’ll find them in spots where they embellish photography, illustrate concepts, or improve the hierarchy of content.

    Trademark Information

    All of IUP’s trademarks, service marks, logos, and identifiers are owned by Indiana University of Pennsylvania and cannot be use or reproduced without permission from the chief marketing officer.

    The requirement to secure permission for use of a trademark, service mark, logo, or identifier applies to both on- and offline uses, including use on social media accounts.

    Permission to use university-owned trademarks, service marks, logos, and identifiers is ordinarily granted only to offices and departments within Indiana University of Pennsylvania itself that are staffed by full-time employees.

    Permission may be granted for the production of licensed apparel and other items. The Indiana University of Pennsylvania licensing program is handled via our licensing agent, the Student Co-operative Association.

    Indiana University of Pennsylvania does not grant permission for the use of its trademarks, service marks, logos, and identifiers on social media accounts not controlled by the university.

    Creating and Requesting Graphic Assets

    Complying with all these guidelines and standard can be complicated. Our template library integrates all of them, helping you build better brand-appropriate marketing collateral.

    Never try to create assets like the IUP logo from scratch or pull them from another document. That leads to inconsistencies we try to avoid. Instead, look for help from our division to get the right assets, implemented the right way.