Winter-Spring, 2022

Message from the President

It’s All about Impact

Everything has changed.

Since the COVID pandemic arrived in the spring of 2020, all of us have been impacted in ways we could not have predicted. It challenged us to do things differently, and we became keenly aware of how everything we do has an impact on others.

The pandemic is not over yet, but we are slowly getting back to what we call the “ever-changing normal.” Our students, most of whom studied online for more than a year, have been back on campus since the fall. The events that bring our communities together have also returned.

But everything has changed. Social distancing is now the norm, as is masking inside IUP buildings. Sanitizing our campus continues, and it will for a while longer as we do our part to keep everyone as safe as possible. It’s about impacts. We aim to have positive ones, whether they be in the classroom, in the laboratory, or in any way.

In this issue, you’ll see stories on a wide range of topics. From students who have benefited directly from the Imagine Unlimited campaign to an alumna who cracked codes for the Allied forces during World War II to the upcoming book detailing IUP’s long and illustrious history to a profile of an alumnus who is working to make life easier for dads on the move—these are stories about IUP people we are proud of.

The common thread laced through these stories is the impact IUP has.

When I read an early proof of 1965 graduate and professor emeritus Charles Cashdollar’s history of our university, The IUP Story: Indiana University of Pennsylvania, from Normal School to University, I was impressed with how, no matter the times or the circumstances, IUP has always had an impact locally and globally.

These stories show it. They reveal how we influence the students who come here and how we prepare them to go out and positively make their mark on the world.

While everything has indeed changed at IUP because of the world around us, I’m proud to see that IUP has not changed the way it impacts the world.

In this sense, our “ever-changing normal” will not change. We are committed to making a positive impact. Look inside and you’ll see.

 

Michael Driscoll

President

The Innovators

This video series features faculty, students, and staff who are pursuing new ways of doing things. 

Achievements

Young Alumni Achievement Award

Collage of the six recipients of the IUP Young Alumni Achievement Awards

In virtual events last March, IUP recognized six recent graduates with the 2021 Young Alumni Achievement Award. Each college dean selects a recipient who has graduated within the last 15 years.

Eberly College of Business and Information Technology: Kelly Welde Henderson ’12, M’13, vice president, Talent Program manager, PNC Financial Services, Washington, DC

College of Education and Communications: Jessica Bowser Dirsmith M’06, D’13, clinical assistant professor, Department of Counseling, Psychology, and Special Education, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh

College of Fine Arts: James McNabb M’15, owner/artist, McNabb Studio, Philadelphia

College of Health and Human Services: Tessa Minnick Mongold ’10, M’12, Environmental, Health, and Safety manager, Johnstown Bottling and Laurel Packaging, Pepsi Beverages North America, Johnstown

College of Humanities and Social Sciences: Cameron Wilkins ’06, president/owner, Wilkins Company, Erie

Kopchick College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics: Ardian Soca Wibowo ’05, cofounder and chief scientific officer, Helix BioStructures, LLC, Indianapolis

 

Senate Awards

The University Senate recognized four faculty members and a staff member in May:

Prashanth Bharadwaj

Prashanth Bharadwaj, professor of management, dean’s associate in the Eberly College of Business, and now the college’s interim dean, received the Distinguished Faculty Award for Teaching. He leads many IUP international programs, including the MBA program in India, the Discover India study tour, and the Executive MBA and PhD in Business programs with Arab American University. He also directs Eberly’s School of International Management.

Gloria Park, professor of English, received the Distinguished Faculty Award for Research. Specializing in teacher education for teaching English to speakers of other languages, she has published research in and has served as an editor for many internationally recognized publications, including the Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching. She is also a national screener for Fulbright applicants to South Korea and other Asian countries.

David Chambers

David Chambers, associate professor of political science, received the Distinguished Faculty Award for Service. A department chair for many years, he has coordinated the MA in Public Affairs program and has led IUP’s Free Speech Project. He has been active with the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties, has helped streamline the promotion process, and has chaired the IUP-APSCUF Grievance Committee.

Jason Worzbyt

Jason Worzbyt ’93, professor of bassoon and associate director of bands, received the Distinguished Faculty Award for Creative Arts. He has performed and recorded with wind ensembles and orchestras across the country and has served as guest conductor for many school and professional ensembles. He is also a band representative for the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association and a former District 3 president and higher education representative.

Bev Mastalski

Beverly Gruss Mastalski ’86, administrative assistant in the College of Health and Human Services dean’s office, received the Distinguished Staff Award for Service. She has been instrumental in revising her college’s internship process, maintaining affiliation agreements with more than 1,000 sites. She also edits her college’s monthly alumni newsletter. A member of the IUP Guides program in its inaugural year, she supported more than 25 new students.

 

Alumni Board

George Kelly ’82, of Aurora, Ohio, and Ryan A. Miller ’02, of McLean, Virginia, recently joined the IUP Alumni Association Board of Directors. Current board officers are Tonya Anthony Hsiung ’00, M’03, president, Lancaster; Leslie Miller Purser ’80, vice president, Dandridge, Tennessee; Brenda Peterman ’87, treasurer, Nutley, New Jersey; and Jerome Brown II ’97, secretary, Rockville, Maryland.

New Trustee

Last May, Maura King, an early childhood and special education major from East Brady, became the new student member of the IUP Council of Trustees, replacing outgoing student-trustee Abigaelle Vertil. King is the sister of Caleb King ’19, IUP’s student-trustee from 2017 to 2019. Maura is a member, and Caleb a former member of IUP’s Cook Honors College.

Supporting Student-Parents

Last fall, the US Department of Education awarded IUP more than $600,000 to continue another four years in the Child Care Access Means Parents in School program, which covers up to 90 percent of childcare costs for low-income student-parents. This is the second round of funding that Kalani Palmer, program director and faculty member in the Department of Professional Studies in Education, has secured.

Fulbright International Teachers

For the sixth consecutive year, IUP was a host for the Fulbright Distinguished Awards in Teaching Program for International Teachers. Through the program, 18 teachers from 11 countries spent time at IUP and at Indiana and Pittsburgh schools. Lara Luetkehans, interim provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, and Michele Petrucci D’05, associate vice president for International Education and Global Engagement, secured funding for the program.

Student Awards

Student achievements last spring included the following:

  • Geology major Susan Adams became IUP’s 12th Goldwater Scholarship recipient. Her research focuses on the tectonics of Taiwan.
  • Zane Billy, a finance and management information systems double major, became the first IUP student selected for a Fulbright Canada-Mitacs Globalink Internship. A member of the Cook Honors College, he is IUP’s 17th student Fulbright recipient.
  • A biology and biochemistry double major, Sarah Grandinette became IUP’s fourth recipient of the Kopchick Summer Fellowship. Funded by John Kopchick ’72, M’75 and Char Labay Kopchick ’73, the award provides a 10-week research experience at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Grandinette is a member of IUP’s Cook Honors College.
  • Vincent Thompson ’20, a student in the applied mathematics master’s program, was selected for the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program. Fewer than 15 percent of applicants are selected for this funding. Thompson won a Goldwater Scholarship his junior year.

Archaeology Ranking

IUP’s Master of Arts in Applied Archaeology program ranked third in the world in 2021 in the number of registered professional archaeologists it produced. Established in 2009, the master’s program prepares its graduates to meet US Department of the Interior archaeologist qualification standards, required for inclusion in the Register of Professional Archaeologists.

 

In Brief

Leadership Changes

Recent retirements have shifted several university leadership positions:

  • Last summer, Timothy Moerland retired as provost and vice president for Academic Affairs after nearly nine years of service. During his tenure, he led the development of the University College, the Academic Success Center, and many other initiatives. Lara Luetkehans serves as interim provost, while Sue Rieg ’81, M’82 fills in for Luetkehans as head of the College of Education and Communications.
  • In June, Deanne Snavely retired as dean of the Kopchick College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. In her 11 years at IUP, she helped raise the profile of science and math and played a key role in the planning of Kopchick Hall, the college’s future home. Former Geoscience chair Steven Hovan is the interim dean.
  • After 29 years of service, Mary Morgan ’91 retired in June as assistant vice president for Alumni and Friends. Upon her retirement, she was recognized for her strong record of establishing and maintaining relationships with alumni. Jennifer Luzier Dunsmore ’98 now leads the office, and Zach Hilliard ’13 is the director of Alumni Engagement.
  • After five years as dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research, former faculty member Randy Martin retired in 2020. Hilliary Creely, former associate dean for research, now fills this role.
  • Upon her retirement last spring as executive director of Institutional Planning and Assessment, Barbara Duda Moore ’84 was recognized by the IUP Council of Trustees for 37 years of distinguished service. Chris Kitas now leads this office.
  • In January, Prashanth Bharadwaj began serving as interim dean of the Eberly College of Business. He is a longtime professor of management and dean’s associate.
  • Last spring, Curtis Scheib ’77, M’78 was named dean of the College of Arts and Humanities, which was established through a reconfiguration that reduced the number of academic colleges from six to five. Yaw Asamoah is now dean of the University College and IUP Libraries.

Named Spaces

The IUP Council of Trustees recently approved naming several campus spaces:

  • In Cogswell Hall, the trombone studio was named for Christian Dickinson and the music theater hall for Sarah Mantel. Dickinson retired from the music faculty last June after 36 years of service. Mantel, who retired in 2013 after 27 years of service, died in November, two months after the naming.
  • The terrace at the Breezedale Alumni Center was named for Mary Jo Banks Lyttle ’86, M’89, former director of the Office of Alumni Relations, whose 26 years of service ended with her death in 2015. Mary Jo’s husband, Kim Lyttle ’72, M’74, and Carl Johnson ’73 were recognized for supporting the terrace’s restoration.
  • The Allenwood Restaurant dining room was named for home economics graduate Isabella Wilkinson Green ’28. Her son, Donald Green, was recognized for his support of the restaurant and the university.

 

Punxsutawney’s Light

A key figure in establishing and advancing the IUP Academy of Culinary Arts in Punxsutawney, Elaine Light died October 2, 2021, at 99. She had worked as a reporter in Pittsburgh before marrying Sam Light in the 1950s and moving to Punxsutawney, where they raised two daughters. While Sam led the Groundhog Club, Elaine created popular groundhog-themed cookbooks. Over the years, she also studied with culinary greats, including Julia Child and Jacques Pepin.

A longtime board president of the Punxsutawney Area College Trust, Light is credited both with suggesting that Punxsutawney start a culinary school and with garnering support to establish it. When the Academy of Culinary Arts was dedicated in 1990, Light helped cut the ribbon. Nearly 20 years later, she would attend another IUP dedication, this time for Punxsutawney’s Fairman Centre. The center is home to the Samuel R. and Elaine K. Light Culinary Library, which houses her collection of cookbooks, many autographed by the celebrity chefs with whom she studied.

 

Letters to the Editor

An Uplifting Program

I was inspired to read Edith Cord’s story in the Winter/Spring 2021 issue. Toward the end of her article, she references tutoring in conjunction with the School of Education. An organization that many students may remember is Operation Uplift, which was started by a VISTA [Volunteers in Service to America] volunteer in the late 1960s and continued into the late 1970s. Operation Uplift got referrals from elementary school teachers for their students who could benefit from tutoring and paired them with IUP students who volunteered at least once a week to tutor math and/or English. Operation Uplift drove the volunteers to communities like Homer City, Black Lick, and Clymer weeknights so the children could receive one-on-one tutoring in their town community building or church. The experiences were a win-win for everyone; the volunteers got a chance to use their teaching skills, and the children benefited with a sort of “educational Big Brothers Big Sisters.” About once a year, we would bring some children onto the IUP campus so they could have the experience of being in a college environment. This was a real eye-opener for children who may not have had that experience otherwise.

Starting as a van driver, then as a tutor, then as the evaluation chairman, I saw firsthand the improvement in grades after the children participated in the tutoring. The quantitative measures were part of the success stories reported to the local agencies that supported Operation Uplift.

In 1975 we expanded to include volunteers from the Kittanning branch campus to tutor a handful of elementary students in that community. I eventually lost track of the program, but I hope it continued for some years.

Glenn Reinhart ’74

Buellton, CA

 

Swimming Pool’s Past

In the Winter/Spring issue, the article by Edith Cord and the Mack Park swimming pool reminded me of a story of an Indiana High School football star. His name was Jim Nance.

Mr. Nance, who was African American, grew up in Indiana. He was an outstanding player at the high school who went on to be an All-American at Syracuse and a pro for the Boston Patriots.

The town of Indiana decided to hold an event honoring Mr. Nance at Mack Park. While addressing the crowd, he said, “I find it ironic that an event honoring me is being held beside a swimming pool that would not allow me in while I was growing up in the town of Indiana.”

Bob Risaliti ’74

Mechanicsburg, PA

 

A Rights Education That Came with Pie

I very much enjoyed Edith Cord’s article in the Winter/Spring issue; it was both surprising and eye-opening. I was a student at Indiana from 1964 to 1967 but was unaware of most of the activities Mrs. Cord describes during that time. I guess that speaks to how egocentric our lives are. During my first year at Indiana, I remember frequenting a coffeehouse in the basement of the home of Lutheran campus minister Roy Hoch and his wife, Mary Jane. There we sang protest songs “We Shall Overcome” and “The Back of the Bus,” including in the latter a verse about swimming in Mack pool. I also remember Miss Lingenfelter, a teacher at Keith School, leading us in protest songs.

Then, in the summer of 1965, through the mission arm of the Presbyterian church, I took a job as a counselor at Camp Norge, a resident camp in Rockland County, New York, serving children from the South Bronx, most of whom were Black or Latinx. This was a remarkable experience, especially since I spent free weekends in the South Bronx visiting families of campers and other counselors. When I got back to campus that fall, I became more active in learning about racial discrimination and working to overcome it under the mentorship of Rev. Bill Richard, Presbyterian campus minister.

In the spring of 1967, when I returned to campus after being away student teaching, I was given the opportunity to room with Emiko Takeuchi, a student from Japan. She introduced me to the rest of the small foreign student body, including Gallia Kallon from Sierra Leone, David Kibirigi from Uganda, and a couple from South Africa whose names escape me but for whose young daughters, Manda and Sheba, I used to babysit. I learned a tremendous amount from this group. That spring I became a founding member of a group we called the Committee for Social Expansion, which worked with Reverend Richard and the college administration to contact Black high school students in Pittsburgh, arranging for them to tour the Indiana campus and encouraging them to apply. There was some pushback from Indiana students. One wrote a letter to the student newspaper, questioning the need to promote the education of Black students from Pittsburgh. I wrote a letter in reply, saying that our goal was not just to promote their education but to promote ours, as well. How can one consider oneself educated if there is a whole sector of society with whom one has no experience?

One other very fond memory I have of my years at Indiana: The details are fuzzy after more than half a century, but I remember a group of us attending a church service in Chevy Chase one Sunday morning. After the service, a woman from the congregation invited me to lunch at her house, and I accepted. It was just the two of us, and what I remember is her warm hospitality—that and the sweet potato pie she served for dessert. I had never liked sweet potatoes, but her pie was delicious, and I’ve loved sweet potatoes ever since. 

 Judy Love-Fischer ’67

Scotch Plains, NJ

 IUP students who studied at the Université de Nancy II in 1977-78 under Victor Drescher’s leadership

 

Above: IUP students who studied at the Université de Nancy II in 1977-78 under Victor Drescher’s leadership.

 

Nancy: Setting the Record Straight

I was pleasantly surprised to see how much time and energy have been devoted to establishing the actual starting date of the IUP French Studies program at the University of Nancy in recent issues of this magazine. Since I was the person who took the first group of IUP students to study there in the spring of 1977, I thought it would be fitting for me to add some background information.

Those were heady times for IUP, the ’70s. We were still the only state-owned university, and students would walk barefoot on hot coals to be admitted. We had a very young and energetic president, Robert Wilburn, who wasn’t afraid to try something new. Add to the mix a very supportive associate dean with a background in foreign languages, Suzanne Hudson, and everything fell into place.

In the spring of 1977, we [Drescher and his wife, who also brought their three children] took three students to study at what was then the Université de Nancy II and is now known as the Université de Lorraine. The first IUP students in the Nancy program were Leigh Ann Galbraith, Patty Shields, and Terri Vosko. Part of my mission, in addition to establishing the study program, was to develop internships for students to get practical experience using their French by working at French companies during the summer. The first IUP student to do an internship in France was Terri Vosko, who worked for Ferry-Perfocarte in the outskirts of Nancy.

Since the program seemed to be off to a successful start, I was asked to return for academic year 1977-78. That fall semester enrolled a group of 12 students. In the summer of 1978, these students did internships at the Paris office of UNESCO [United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization], the Agence France Presse (French equivalent of the Associated Press), IBM’s Paris office, and Air France at Orly Airport, among others. 

This was an exceptional group of students. In the picture, taken in the spring of 1978, the student at front left is Marla Sabo, who went on to become president and chief operating officer of Christian Dior Couture Americas and was featured on the cover of the Fall 2007 issue of IUP Magazine

In the summer of 1978, my time in Nancy was over, and my friend and colleague, now-retired IUP French professor Foster Jones, moved his family to Nancy and took over. But by 1984, we needed to add a summer program in France for students who couldn’t spend an entire year or semester abroad. I took the first summer group of a dozen or so students to Nancy, but the program quickly grew, because we offered professors outside the Foreign Languages Department the opportunity to recruit their own students and travel with us. At the University of Nancy, they would teach a course specifically tailored to the French environment. One professor, Donna Streifthau, led successive groups to study L’Ecole de Nancy, a form of Art Nouveau that developed in Nancy at the end of the 19th century. And history professor Merle Rife, a devoted Francophile, taught numerous courses on Franco-American history in Nancy.

When I left the summer program in 1989, it was taken over by Renée Nicolet Liscinsky and Ludo op de Beeck, who shared direction for years until Renée died in a collision while driving back to Nancy on the rainy night of Bastille Day, July 14, 2001. Dr. op de Beeck took the group for a few years until he retired. Current Foreign Languages Department chair Charles McCreary became director in 2004 and, except for a brief hiatus from 2014 to 2017, has managed to continue the tradition of IUP students at the University of Nancy. Naturellement, the program was canceled in 2020 due to COVID.

Victor Drescher

IUP Professor Emeritus

Kittanning, PA

Mentors

 

Island Escape

Through the Sculpture Support System, an artist collaborative they started two years earlier, faculty members Sharon Massey and Sean Derry led creation of a public art installation, Traffic Island Oasis, along Oakland Avenue across from the Oak Grove last May. With their used-cardboard creations, Massey’s 3D Design students transformed the space into a whimsical escape from pandemic-related restrictions.

IUP Innovators

The latest faculty members featured in IUP’s Innovators video series are Mike Sell and Veronica Watson, both of the English Department.

In “Engaging Young Writers with Digital Story Games,” Sell discusses his joint project with IUP master’s and doctoral graduate Rachel Schiera that leads school-age children in creating interactive digital stories and builds their skills in writing and computer coding along the way. In “Applying the Humanities to Police Training,” Watson details discussion of Black detective novels with police cadets to encourage them to think about how they’ll treat the people they police. More about Watson’s initiative is in “Imagine Unlimited Impact” on page 12.

Started in 2019, the video series has highlighted other faculty projects, including Greg Kenning’s sensor that measures the freshness of milk and other products, Matthew Vetter’s classroom contributions to Wikipedia, and guidance from Joann Migyanka ’97, M’01, D’06 to help emergency workers interact with people with autism. See the videos at IUP.edu/innovators.

WWII Crash Site Study

Last summer, Anthropology faculty members Andrea Palmiotto and William Chadwick led an excavation at the site of a World War II plane crash in Germany. They sought to assist with a larger US effort to account for missing military personnel from past conflicts. Nine undergraduate and two graduate students from IUP took part in the six-week study near Gifhorn.

IUP had been chosen for the task by the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, in conjunction with the Defense POW-MIA Accounting Agency. A forensic anthropologist with the DPAA before coming to IUP, Palmiotto had worked on WWII, Korean War, and Vietnam War cases and had led excavations in Vietnam and Laos.

 

Faculty Deaths

The following former faculty members died in recent months:

Thomas Ault, a faculty member who retired from the Department of Theater and Dance in 2011 after 23 years of service, died March 7, 2021.

Kenneth Brode, who retired as a professor of German in 2004 after 41 years of service, died February 3, 2021.

Christine Butler ’96, M’03, who retired from the Counseling Center faculty in 2011, died October 16, 2021.

Patrick Carone, a former professor of political science and director of International Affairs who retired in 2003 after 36 years of service, died August 24, 2021.

Edith Cord, a faculty member in the Department of Foreign Languages in the 1960s and ’70s, died September 21, 2021. She wrote “Our Fight for Civil Rights in Indiana” for the Winter/Spring 2021 edition of IUP Magazine.

Frankie DeGeorge M’85, who taught in the Professional Studies in Education Department between 1995 and 1997, died March 16, 2021.

John Dropcho ’58, a professor emeritus who retired from the Art Department in 1992 after 25 years of service, died September 1, 2021.

Ralph Feather Jr. ’71, M’74, a faculty member in the Physics Department from 2003 to 2005, died November 7, 2021.

Sarah Mantel, a professor emerita who retired from the Music Department in 2013 after 27 years of service, during which she directed the Opera and Music Theatre program, died November 13, 2021.

Scott Salser ’84, a temporary faculty member in the Music Department in 2009 and a former Community Music School instructor, died December 18, 2021.

Gould “Fred” Schrock ’58, M’61, a professor emeritus who retired from the Biology Department in 1996 after 28 years of service, died July 5, 2021.

Ed Sloniger, a professor emeritus who retired from the Health and Physical Education Department in 1998 after 30 years of service, died December 31, 2021. Also the golf coach for 17 seasons, he was inducted into IUP’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 2005.

Vincent Taiani, a faculty member who retired from the Marketing Department in 2012 after 32 years of service, died December 10, 2021.

Eugene Thibadeau, a professor emeritus who retired from the Foundations of Education Department in 2008 after 38 years of service, died March 25, 2021.

Nancy McCullough Tiger ’49, a temporary faculty member in the College of Home Economics from 1974 to 1980, died April 30, 2021.

Ned Wert ’58, a professor emeritus who taught in the Art Department for 18 years and retired as director of the University Museum in 1996 after six years in that position, died January 9, 2022.

Milestone Generosity: October - December, 2020

Imagine Unlimited Giving

The university community is grateful for the following gifts and pledges of $25,000 or more, made to the Foundation for IUP between October 1 and December 31, 2020, through the Imagine Unlimited campaign:

Kathleen Baker ’94, a pledge of $25,000 to establish the Carl Adams Scholarship for Flute Performance for full-time students pursuing a degree in music with a concentration in flute

Chris Brussalis, a pledge of $25,000 to support the Robert C. Camp Business Scholarship

Larry Kubala ’68 and Barbara Bentrim Kubala ’68, M’73, a gift of $25,000 to establish the Barbara and Larry Kubala Scholarship for Fine Arts for full-time students pursuing a fine arts degree, with preference given to art education majors

Andrew Longacre ’13, M’19, a pledge of $25,000 to establish the Gealy Wallwork Memorial Scholarship for Student Leadership for full-time students in good academic standing who are involved in leadership activities or are in a leadership position on campus

Khatmeh Osseiran-Hanna and Ibrahim Hanna, a pledge of $25,000 to establish the Osseiran-Hanna Endowed Scholarship for undergraduate or graduate international students from Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan, Syria, Iraq, Kuwait, or Cyprus

Sharon Ann Plowman, a gift of $25,000 to establish the Mary Rita Theiss Plowman Scholarship for full-time students with financial need who are majoring in early childhood education, with preference given to students from Allegheny County or Westmoreland County

William Richardson ’81, a pledge of $25,000 to establish the IUP Alumni Computer Science Scholarship for full-time students with financial need who are majoring in computer science

Scott Electric Foundation, Inc., a gift of $25,000 to support the Fund for IUP

Robert Strouse ’70 and Susan Strouse, a planned gift of $25,000 to establish the Bob and Sue Strouse Boardwalk Bowl Scholarship for full-time students with financial need who are in good academic standing and who are members of the football team

  1. Pat Daugherty, a gift of $40,000 to support IUP

Pat Mazanek ’73, M’82 and Patti Shannahan Mazanek ’74, M’86, a pledge of $41,853 to support the Fund for IUP, the Dean’s Merit Scholarship in the College of Education and Communications, IUP Magazine, the football program, the Sutton Scholarship, the Nell Jack Endowment, and the Lively Arts

Frank Baker and Mary Baker, a pledge of $50,000 to support the Kopchick College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics building

Richard Caruso ’83, a pledge of $50,000 to support the Richard F. and Margaret C. Caruso Scholarship for freshmen who are graduates of Kane, Chartiers-Houston, or Canon-McMillan High School

Michael Driscoll and Rebecca Driscoll, a pledge of $50,000 to support the Dr. Bennett Rafoth Endowment, which supports the Kathleen Jones White Writing Center

William Grant ’75 and Mary Grant, combined gifts of $50,000 to support the William J. Grant Family Football Scholarship for full-time students who are members of the football team

Daniel Markey ’77 and Linda Markey, a gift of $50,000 in support of the Kopchick College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics building, made in honor and memory of Walter Granata, who helped establish the Department of Geoscience and served as chair from 1972 to 1979

Diane Mularz ’72, a planned gift of $50,000 to establish the Denise Mularz Wilks ’72 Scholarship for English for full-time students at the main campus who are pursuing a degree in the Department of English and the Diane E. Mularz ’72 Fund for Mathematics

Rodney Ruddock ’65, M’75 and Ellen Sylves Ruddock ’66, a planned gift of $50,000 to establish two scholarships—the Rodney D. and Ellen Sylves Ruddock Mathematics Scholarship for full-time mathematics majors and the Rodney D. and Ellen Sylves Ruddock Business Scholarship for full-time students in the Eberly College of Business—and to continue support of the Rod Ruddock Baseball Scholarship for students participating in baseball

Symmco Foundation, a pledge of $50,000 to support the Culinary Academy Enhancement Fund

Beaumont Foundation of America, a gift of $60,000 to support the C. Edward Keller Scholarship for Criminology and Criminal Justice

Mary Ann Dickey, combined gifts totaling $75,000 to support the Nursing and Allied Health Enhancement Fund

Wanda Stitt-Gohdes ’70 and William Gohdes, a planned gift of $81,037 to establish the Dr. Wanda Stitt-Gohdes and Dr. William Gohdes Scholarship for full-time undergraduate students with a declared major in the Eberly College of Business and with preference given to graduates of western Pennsylvania high schools

Joan Frey Boytim ’55, M’64, a planned gift of $100,000 in support of the Joan Frey Boytim Scholarships for Vocal Performance—Male and Female; the Joan Frey Boytim Scholarship for Keyboard Accompanist; the James A. Boytim, EdD, Scholarship; the James A. Boytim, EdD, Scholarship for Mathematics; and the James A. Boytim, EdD, Scholarship for Circle K

Blane Dessy ’73, a planned gift of $105,000 to establish the Blane Dessy Enhancement Fund for the IUP Libraries to support academic and programmatic needs, with priority given to continuing education, training, and other opportunities for staff

An anonymous planned gift of $200,000 to establish the IUP Alumni Veterans Scholarship for Athletics for active members of an NCAA-recognized team, with preference given to students from Cambria County

Duane Miller and Jesse Miller, a gift of property valued at $200,000 in support of the new Academy of Culinary Arts building

An anonymous planned gift of $250,000 to support the Global Engagement Scholarship for students participating in a sanctioned and approved study abroad program

Florence Mauchant M’85, a planned gift of $250,000 to establish the Florence J. Mauchant Scholarship to recruit students and/or to entice highly qualified graduate students to enroll in the MBA program, with preference given to international students from francophone countries

Douglas Roblin ’75, a pledge of $250,000 to establish the Douglas W. Roblin Award Fund for projects administered through the Department of Anthropology and the Madia Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry, Physics, and Engineering, with first preference given to interdisciplinary projects involving members of both departments and to projects involving graduate students and/or junior faculty

An anonymous planned gift of $1,000,000 to establish two scholarships for full-time students who have attained at least sophomore status: one scholarship for students pursuing a natural science BS degree in the Kopchick College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, with preference given to those with financial need or working toward a biology, chemistry, or pre-veterinary degree, and another scholarship for elementary education majors, with preference given to those with financial need or with a concentration in mathematics

An anonymous planned gift of $1,750,000 to establish two scholarships, one for mathematics education majors and another for art education majors

Milestone Generosity: 2021

The university community is grateful for the following gifts and pledges of $25,000 or more, made to the Foundation for IUP between January 1 and December 31, 2021.

Bonnie Harbison Anderson ’80, a gift of $25,000 to support the Deanne L. Snavely Kopchick College Student Professional Development Fund

David Best ’00, M’02, a gift of $25,000 to support the Enhancing IUP Endowment, which supports the academic and programmatic needs of the university

The Estate of Helene L. Boroch ’76, a gift of $25,000 to establish the Helene L. Boroch Memorial Scholarship for full-time students majoring in nursing

Gerald Clark ’69 and Cheryl Dunlap Clark ’68, a gift of $25,000 to support the Jerry and Cheryl Clark Boardwalk Bowl Scholarship

Anthony Ferrari ’70 and Kitty Ferrari, a planned gift of $25,000 to establish the Anthony J. and Kitty Ferrari Boardwalk Bowl Scholarship for members of the football team

Elizabeth Yoe Fiddler ’72, a gift of $25,000 to establish the Dr. Jerry B. Fiddler Memorial Scholarship for full-time students pursuing an undergraduate degree in education

Ronald Lunardini ’69 and Margaret Evans Lunardini ’69, a pledge of $25,000 to establish the Ron and Peggy Lunardini Fund for expenses associated with the Department of Student Affairs in Higher Education’s Lunardini Distinguished Alumni Award

Cynthia Nixon Mastro, a gift of $25,000 to establish the Joseph M. Mastro Memorial Scholarship for full-time students pursuing a BSEd degree in social studies

Edward Receski and Andrea Fako, a pledge of $25,000 to create the Coach Ed Receski Boardwalk Bowl Scholarship for members of the football team

The Statler Foundation, a gift of $25,000 to establish a scholarship for students in the Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism, and Event Management program based on academic excellence, character, and commitment to the industry

The Estate of Jack H. Reefer Jr. ’69, a gift of $26,200 to the Daniel DiCicco Marching Band Endowment for the purchase of new instruments or the repair of existing instruments for the marching band and to the Jack H. and Dorothy A. Reefer Memorial Endowment for Football for full-time students who are members of the football team

Marilyn Silvey, a gift of $26,397 to support the Bedford John “BJ” Silvey Sr. (’62) Scholarship for full-time incoming freshmen

The Spadafora Family, a gift of $27,000 to establish the Spadafora IUP Swim Team Enhancement Fund for academic and programmatic needs of the swimming team

The Robert and Nellie Reynolds Fund, a gift of $29,288 to support the Sutton Scholarship for incoming freshmen with a grade point average of 3.25 or higher and an SAT score of at least 1100. Robert Reynolds and Nellie Byers Reynolds were members of the Class of 1948.

An anonymous pledge of $30,000 to establish a scholarship for music majors, with preference given to those with a concentration in voice

The Leonard A. and Mary Jane Schafer Foundation, a gift of $30,000 to support the Fund for the IUP Libraries for resources, supplies, services, and staff, and to support the Student Assistance Fund for students experiencing financial hardship caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Mary Jane McMurray Schafer was a member of the Class of 1931.

The Salsgiver Family Fund, a gift of $35,000 to support the Dorothy Peterman Salsgiver Scholarship for Nursing and Allied Health

James Staples, a gift of $37,307 to support the Dr. James Staples Piano Scholarship for full-time students pursuing a BFA in piano performance

The Estate of Robert Coleman Jr. ’50, a gift of $39,749 to support the Fund for IUP

An anonymous gift of $50,000 to establish a scholarship for applied statistics

An anonymous gift of $50,000 to establish the Coach Fry Scholarship for student-athletes and the Coach Fry Athletic Enhancement Fund

Barry Balliet ’74 and Diane Klingensmith Balliet ’75, a combined pledge and planned gift of $50,000 to support the Barry and Diane Balliet Scholarship for Nursing for full-time nursing majors

The Fleischner Family Charitable Foundation, gifts totaling $50,000 to support the Humanities Training in Law Enforcement program

David Karl ’64, M’68, a planned gift of $50,000 to establish the David Karl Scholarship for Education for full-time undergraduate education majors

Diane Kirkland Krise ’89 and Timothy Krise, a gift of $50,000 to support the Academy of Culinary Arts

Kimberly Brown Moore ’74, M’75 and David Shores, a planned gift of $50,000 to establish the Kimberly B. Moore Human Development/Family Science Enhancement Fund for the academic and programmatic needs of students in the Human Development and Family Science program or the Family and Consumer Sciences Education program

Anita Malone Shaffer ’54, a planned gift of $50,000 to establish the Phillippi-Malone Family Scholarship for full-time students in the Family and Consumer Sciences Education program or the Human Development and Family Science program

An anonymous pledge of $52,500 to support a scholarship for full-time students pursuing an education degree, with preference given to those who graduated from Indiana Area Senior High School

Gretchen Barbor M’85 and John Barbor, a gift of $56,549 to support the Theater and Dance Enhancement Fund

Tim Cejka ’73 and Debra Phillips Cejka ’73, combined gifts of $75,000 to support the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Building Fund and the Deanne L. Snavely Kopchick College Student Professional Development Fund

Shirley Shepard M’69, a planned gift of $83,078 to establish the IUP Master’s of Education Scholarship for students in the MEd in Education program, with preference given to those with an elementary education focus

Paul Costo ’60, M’65, a planned gift of $100,000 to the IUP Libraries’ Special Collections and Archives Fund

The Estate of Trevor R. Hadley ’68, a combined gift of $100,000 to support the S. Trevor (’37) and Olive (M’67) Hadley Scholarship, awarded yearly to the Student Affairs in Higher Education program participant deemed most outstanding on the basis of academic performance and professional contributions

Punxsutawney Area College Trust, gifts totaling $100,000 to support the Academy of Culinary Arts Student Scholarship and the Punxsutawney Campus

The Estate of Robert Mallick ’84, a gift of $112,676 to establish the Robert Mallick Scholarship for students pursuing a degree in the Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences

The Estate of Bruce A. Schonour ’71, a gift of $134,992 to support the Bruce Schonour Scholarship for full-time students in the Robert E. Cook Honors College; the Bruce Schonour Enhancement Fund for the IUP Marching Band; the Bruce Schonour Scholarship for Music for full-time students in the Department of Music; the Bruce Schonour Enhancement Fund for the IUP Swim Team; the Bruce Schonour Enhancement Fund for the Theater; and the Charles Davis and Robert Ensley Memorial Scholarship for full-time students in the Department of Theatre, Dance, and Performance

 

Terry Serafini ’61 and Janet Serafini, combined gifts of $189,415 to support the Terry Serafini Legacy Fund

An anonymous gift of $250,000 to support the Crimson Scholars Circle and its programmatic needs

An anonymous gift of $400,000 to the IUP Arboretum Fund for materials for the arboretum and to the Allegheny Arboretum Enhancement Fund, which supports the Allegheny Arboretum at IUP

An anonymous planned gift of $781,000 to establish a scholarship for full-time students majoring in accounting or finance, with preference given to graduates of Seneca Valley High School in Harmony

Marla Prizant Weston ’80 and Richard Weston, a gift of $850,000 to establish the Marla Weston New Horizon Scholarship for full-time nursing majors

James Berty ’70 and Gailen Dean, a planned gift of $1,580,000 to establish the Berty-Dean Trust for Secondary Science and Music Education, which provides scholarship support to students majoring in secondary science education or music education

Allen Amos ’71 and Jane Amos, a planned gift of $2,800,000 to establish the Allen and Jane Amos Scholarship for full-time students with financial need