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IUP in the News

Faculty, staff, and students make the news:

The Center for Family Business at Indiana University of Pennsylvania strives to keep the area's family-owned businesses informed on a range of critical topics, thereby increasing their chances of survival and succession of leadership to the next generation. Founded in 1997, the center is part of the university's Eberly College of Business and Information Technology.”

"IUP Center focuses on family business"
Pittsburgh Tribune Review,March 28, 2013

Luray Caverns is the third most-visited cave in the United States, trailing only Mammoth Cave in Kentucky and Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Those are national parks. Luray Caverns is what is called a show cave, defined by the National Caves Association as “developed for public visitation.” In other words, show caves are there to make money. “The names reflect the popular culture of the day,” said Kevin Patrick, a professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania who has written about the development of show caves. “It used to be Pluto. Now, it’s Jabba the Hutt.”

"The rift: A family dynasty fights over the future of Luray Caverns"
Washington Post,March 14, 2013

For those who work to understand or unmask fraud and its impact: Indiana University of Pennsylvania is hosting a speaker you'll want to catch. Professionals involved with financial institutions, insurance and accounting agencies, law enforcement and cybercrime analysis can sit in on Financial Crimes: The Seminar, which will be held at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex on March 6.

"IUP to Host Financial Crimes Seminar,"
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat,Feb. 25, 2013

 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s graduate and undergraduate commencement ceremonies will take place Saturday. The ceremony for graduate students will be at 9:30 a.m. in Fisher Auditorium. The undergraduate ceremony will be held at 1 p.m. in the Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex.

"PASSHE Universities will hold winter commencements this weekend,"
CBS-TV Channel 21 (Harrisburg, Pa.),Dec. 10, 2012

 

The couple, both 2007 graduates of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, said they were looking to start their own business when they learned Meadows, which originally opened in the central part of the state, was franchising its business. “It’s something I’ve always wanted to do,” said Joe Bier, who had been working in sales, of opening a business.

"Meadows Original Frozen Custard Taking Over Former Cranberry Creamery,"
Cranberry (Pa.) Patch, Dec. 10, 2012

 

Jeremy Hartley, Tower City, a journalism major at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, was up close and personal in a media exercise in the ROTC Battalion for its fall training exercise at Camp Dawson, W.Va. A son of Robert Hartley, Harrisburg, and Debra Hartley, Tower City, Jeremy is a 1998 graduate of Williams Valley High School. He is a dean's list student, a member of the IUP Society of Professional Journalists and a staff writer for The Penn student newspaper. Five IUP journalism students participated in the exercises along with 140 IUP ROTC Cadets from Oct. 12 through 14. The students were incorporated into the unit as they observed and participated in numerous training events while practicing field collection of data and photography, facing the challenges that come with "being deployed with" an Army unit. The cadets gained training in escorting and facilitating media on the battlefield. Jeremy served as an HM3 in the Navy from 2006-11. He was deployed to Afghanistan with the Marine Corps 1st Battalion 5th regiment.

"College Notes,"
Republican Herald, Dec. 9, 2012

 

Noteworthy: Moerland has been named provost and vice president for academic affairs at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He starts on Jan. 14. Occupation: Moerland will be the chief academic officer of IUP and will report directly to university President Michael Driscoll. He would serve as president in Driscoll’s absence.

"Newsmaker: Timothy S. Moerland,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Dec. 6, 2012

 

"They're just average guys," said Lt. Col. David Meyer. It was early in the afternoon on Saturday, Oct. 13, at a mock Middle-Eastern village that was set up on the outskirts of Camp Dawson, W. Va. As Meyer spoke, paint splattered across the metal buildings. The Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps was participating in a field-training exercise learning tactical maneuvers via a paintball match. But beneath the Gore-Tex camouflage jackets and paintball masks existed exactly what Meyer said: average people. I traveled with IUP's ROTC to Camp Dawson to act as a journalist embedded into a military unit. Four of my staff members and I ate with the cadets, slept in the same barracks as the cadets and, in some cases, attempted to participate in the same activities.

"What a Weekend With the ROTC Taught Me About the Military,"
Huffington Post, Dec. 6, 2012

 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania said today that its new provost and vice president for academic affairs, Timothy Moerland, will start Jan. 14. Since August, Mr. Moerland, 56, has been assistant to the provost for special projects at Kent State University, an official there said. Before that, he was dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State.

"IUP names Kent State's Moerland as provost,"
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Dec. 3, 2012

 

A University of Minnesota-Crookston, associate professor has had her essay “Horrific Obsessions: Poe’s Legacy of the Unreliable Narrator” included in a collection of essays examining genres and media centered on the work of author Edgar Allan Poe. McCoppin earned her doctorate from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pa., her master of arts from Northern Michigan University, Marquette, Mich., and her bachelor of arts in English from the University of Michigan, Flint.

"University of Minnesota-Crookston professor's essay focuses on works of Poe,"
Grand Forks Herald, Minnesota, Nov. 4, 2012

 

After decades of steady and predictable enrollment growth, Pennsylvania colleges and universities might need to cast wider nets to fill their classrooms. At Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a state system school, aggressive and targeted recruitment helped it buck the system’s enrollment dips, school Vice President James Begany said. IUP boosted its student base about 3.5 percent during the past couple of years to 15,379 this fall. The increase includes growth in graduate programs and out-of-state enrollment, which climbed from 6 percent in 2007 to 8.3 percent. Begany said the school does especially well with students from Maryland, Ohio and West Virginia. It uses counselors, mailers and high-tech targeted marketing to approach students. “We really need to diversify,” Begany said, adding the “Hispanic population may be the only growth population in Pennsylvania.” He said the school hired a Latino recruiter and multiplied enrollment in the demographic from 57 students in 2007 to 117 this fall.

"Pennsylvania colleges look elsewhere to overcome shortage, diversify"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Nov. 3, 2012

 

Stephanie Schrider of Mount Airy was nominated for the a bronze-level Presidential Service award for her contributions to the Indiana Arts Council. Schrider is a fashion merchandising and marketing double major at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She is also a 2010 graduate of Urbana High School and the daughter of Robert and Michelle Schrider of Mount Airy. Schrider volunteered 200 hours to the council — a nonprofit that fosters appreciation for the arts in Indiana County, Pa. — where she led several projects, including a fashion show which benefitted Attire to Aspire. Attire to Aspire provides professional clothing for women re-entering the workforce. Schrider was nominated by the council’s volunteer coordinator and will receive a certificate from the national Presidential Council of Service and Civic Participation.

"Mount Airy resident receives Presidential Service award,"
Gaithersburg (MD) Gazette, Nov. 1, 2012

 

Searching ... searching ... YES! IT'S ARRIVED! My mom pulled over to keep us from crashing as I opened my letter from the admissions office at IUP (Indiana University of Pennsylvania). After an impatient rip and unfold, I let out the loudest scream in all of Pennsylvania (and they probably heard me in California). I'M ACCEPTED INTO MY NUMBER ONE COLLEGE!

"A weekend of epic proportion,"
Bucks County Courier Times, Nov. 1, 2012

 

Jerry Sandusky, the former Penn State football coach who was convicted of sexually abusing 10 boys, was moved Wednesday to the State Correctional Institution at Greene in Waynesburg -- which houses death row inmates -- where he will be kept in a cell by himself for the rest of his life. Dennis Giever, a criminology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, said that pedophiles can be very much at risk from the rest of an inmate population. Sometimes, he said, other inmates target those offenders to earn crediblity in prison. "In prison, they are the lowest on the totem pole," Mr. Giever said. "Everybody's going to know him, and everybody's going to want to take a shot at him."

"Jerry Sandusky moved to high-security prison in Greene County,"
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 31, 2012

 

Radu Bordeianu has a simple reason for becoming a United States citizen. “Only in America can a person come with two suitcases and have the life we have now,” said Bordeianu, 37, of Wexford, a theology professor at Duquesne University who arrived in the United States from Romania more than 13 years ago to study. America, Bordeianu said, provides the opportunities “to do what a person has never ever dreamt of doing in their home country.” Bordeianu and his wife, Loredana, were among the 76 people from 32 countries to take the Oath of Allegiance and become citizens on Friday during a ceremony at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"76 celebrate American citizenship at IUP ceremony,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Oct. 27, 2012

 

Noteworthy: (Epryl) King won a Racial Justice Award in education from the YWCA of Greater Pittsburgh. Education: Bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania; master’s in curriculum and instruction from Gannon University; working toward doctorate in curriculum and instruction at IUP.

"Newsmakers: Epryl King,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Oct. 27, 2012

 

The Armstrong Educational Trust Board of Directors welcomes its newest member earlier this month – Dr. Matthew Curci. Dr. Matthew Curci currently serves as the Superintendent of the Apollo-Ridge School District. In addition to his undergraduate degree, he also holds a Master’s Degree in Sports Science and a Doctor of Education Degree in Administration and Leadership Studies, both earned at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"Armstrong Educational Trust Welcomes New Board Member,"
The Kittanning Paper, Oct. 27, 2012

 

IUP’s Promise Plus—now in its third year—aims to expand on the Pittsburgh Promise, which is designed to help all students in Pittsburgh Public Schools plan, prepare and pay for education beyond high school at an accredited post-secondary institution within Pennsylvania.

"Promise Plus spotlighted, as new IUP head welcomed,"
New Pittsburgh Courier, Oct. 24, 2012

 

Michael Dunlap wanted to write the story of his battle with brain cancer. Sue Ellen Dunlap writes about Michael’s first diagnosis of a brain tumor in 2007 when he was 20 and a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She details the “torturous” times of waiting for test results and ultimately receiving the diagnosis of cancer and Michael’s treatments.

"Plum woman documents late son’s cancer battle,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Oct. 24, 2012

 

Bennellick will be in Beijing and Shanghai this week for the China Education Expo, which sponsors college fairs in major cities. She anticipates 10,000 students a day will visit the fairs, where she will be joined by administrators from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Juniata College in Huntingdon. “These efforts will not happen overnight,” Bennellick said of increasing the school’s foreign student population.

"St. Vincent, Seton Hill recruit foreign student,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review,Oct. 17, 2012

 

Fifty years after the Cuban Missile Crisis, the resolution of that conflict is relevant today as the United States and Israel weigh how to handle Iran’s development of nuclear weapons, Cuban missile crisis scholars said during a panel discussion on Monday. Declassified documents and oral histories garnered in the last 50 years have depicted the resolution of the crisis as one of compromise, not brinksmanship, Peter Kornbluh, director of Cuba and Chile Documentation Projects at the National Security Archive at George Washington University, said during a discussion held at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"Cuban missile crisis provides lessons on Iran, scholars say,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Oct. 15, 2012

 

Kory Dillon Webber, of Edinboro, has been inducted into Sigma Alpha Lambda at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Webber is a senior majoring in communications media at the university. Sigma Alpha Lambda is a national leadership and honors organization.

"Achievements,"
Erie Times News, Oct. 15, 2012

 

Eleven of the 14 universities saw declines, including all Western Pennsylvania campuses except Indiana University of Pennsylvania, which registered a 3.5 percent gain to 15,668 students, the largest total enrollment of the 14 schools. The systemwide loss in numbers is the biggest at least since 1990 and may be the largest since the State System's founding three decades ago, officials said. Still, total enrollment remains higher than it was in 2008, due to more than a decade of yearly record enrollments.

"Higher education records reveal enrollment decline in Pennsylvania,"
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 12, 2012

 

But if it comes time for children to enter college and parents have saved very little, there are other ways to pay for higher education. David Hone, a senior at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, has been busy unearthing those other ways. A 41-year-old Army veteran, he is using a combination of loans, government programs and scholarships to fund his education. Andrew Jaros, a 26-year-old IUP student from New Brighton, is trying to follow that advice. He's funding his education through a 25-hour-per-week work-study job, state and federal grants, and federal loans. In the years when he was working before college, he went to restaurants and ate fast food. Now, he tries to live frugally, cooking his own meals in a crockpot. Including a previous year at Penn State Behrend, he's racked up a little more than $20,000 in student loans. It's a bet that he's willing to take. "I'm optimistic about the future and I hope that I'm not being deluded," he said. "I'm building toward something that I think will benefit me long time. I like to think it's going to be worth the debt."

"Saving for college: Whatever you do, don't wait,"
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 11, 2012

 

On Sunday Sept. 30, I finally found a way to make a huge college decision. With my drum major partner, my mom, aunt and friend, I made my way up to Allentown for an unforgettable marching band event, the Collegiate Marching Band Festival. After seeing that 21 college bands were attending, with two that are from my top schools, I had to go. The chance to see two bands that I just might be in next year really excited me. Three o’clock came as fast as it could, leaving me glued to the metal bleachers and my DM partner Nikki’s shoulder. It was happening. The school that really was my number one was entering the field. Indiana University of Pennsylvania was ready (yes, I like schools in Pennsylvania with other states in their names). They ran to their drill spots and played an out-of-this-world show that literally left me in tears, drying my eyes with my sleeves. What had really made me emotional was the IUP drum majors’ conducting style. They marked time while conducting, which I found odd but visually appealing, and the dynamic movements were so creative. I want to be just like an IUP drum major. The enormous bands went on last, leaving me speechless. But I can see myself in a mid-sized band. With the way IUP works it, I don’t think I could say I want to go elsewhere. I desperately want to be an IUP drum major, and I will work extremely hard to get there. I’m already practicing a jump that lands in a split (it’s not pretty . . . yet).

"Collegiate Marching Band Festival solidifies my school choice,"
Philadelphia Intelligencer/The Courier Times/Burlington County Times, Oct. 11, 2012

 

Eleven of the 14 universities saw declines, including all western Pennsylvania campuses except Indiana University of Pennsylvania, which saw an increase of 3.5 percent to 15,668.

"Professors jam State System meeting,"
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 11, 2012

 

With 30 years of service with Harford County Public Schools, former teacher and interim superintendent Patricia Skebeck was honored by the school board and her peers as she was inducted into the Educator Hall of Fame Monday night. Skebeck was born and raised in Indiana, Pa., where she earned a bachelor of science in education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"Pat Skebeck, former superintendent, inducted into HCPS Educator Hall of Fame,"
The Baltimore Sun,Oct. 10, 2012

 

Cranberry Patch will be at the opening night of the Associated Artists of Butler County faculty show at the Cranberry Township Municipal Center. The exhibit runs through Nov. 9. “Poppy,” an original watercolor by Mary Alice Carmody-Diana, also will be raffled off at the event. Attendees must be present to win the artwork, which will be on display at the Patch table. Today, we feature a profile on William Perry, whose pieces “Nine on Penn” and “Herefords” will be on display at the show. Name: Bill Perry Education: B.S. in Art Education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania,

"Art and Win: Meet Artist William Perry,"
CranberryPatch.com, Oct. 9, 2012

 

It’s a particularly poignant question for adopted children when they become aware that they don’t look like their parents. Imagine what it’s like for a teen who is a different race from his or her adoptive parents. “The only time it was ever awkward to me personally is when other people pointed it out,” said Ann Boccuti, a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, who grew up in Upper Gwynedd. She was adopted from China at 17 months old. Snapshots of her life as a student at Penndale Middle School, along with those of three girls in other U.S. cities adopted from China, were filmed by Los Angeles director Linda Goldstein Knowlton and turned into the documentary “Somewhere Between,” which will open a two-week run Friday at Ritz at the Bourse, 400 Ranstead St., Philadelphia. Boccuti and Knowlton will take questions from the audience after the opening weekend screenings Oct. 12 to 14. The film is not recommended for children age 13 and younger. “It’s not exclusive to the adoptive community,” promised Boccuti, who admitted there were some moments that she wished had not been included in the film.

"Documentary details life of Chinese girls abandoned at young age,"
Montgomery Media, Oct. 8, 2012

 

A local student has earned a scholarship for her study at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Academy of Culinary Arts in Punxsutawney. Sarahjane Lopez, daughter of Carl and Pamela Lopez, Chambersburg, is the 2012 recipient of Scholarship. She is a 2011 graduate of James Buchanan High School. At the academy, Lopez has earned high honors, was named to the dean's list and received the perfect attendance award. As part of her studies, Lopez is completing an externship at The Breakers in West Palm Beach, Fla.

“Chambersburg student earns scholarship in culinary arts,”
Chambersburg Public Opinion, Oct. 5, 2012

 

If you want to cut down on your food consumption when dining out, research suggests that opting for male eating companions could help you to consume less food. Researchers from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and the University of Akron found that both men and women consumed fewer calories when dining with men than with women. The researchers believe that this is because we are more aware of our gender when around the opposite sex and women restrict their eating to appear “more feminine” while men eat more around women to appear “more masculine.”

“7 Strange Tricks That Will Help You To Loose Weight,”
UK Lifestyle (Yahoo), Oct. 5, 2012

 

PUNXSUTAWNEY - A local student has earned a scholarship for her study at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Academy of Culinary Arts in Punxsutawney. Sarahjane Lopez, daughter of Carl and Pamela Lopez, Chambersburg, is the 2012 recipient of Scholarship. She is a 2011 graduate of James Buchanan High School. At the academy, Lopez has earned high honors, was named to the dean's list and received the perfect attendance award. As part of her studies, Lopez is completing an externship at The Breakers in West Palm Beach, Fla.

“Chambersburg student earns scholarship in culinary arts,”
Chambersburg Public Opinion, Oct. 5, 2012

 

IUP Professor of Biology Thomas Simmons stops by the Central PA Live studio to talk about the increase in West Nile Virus cases in Pennsylvania and across the country. He also shows some examples of mosquito traps, used in PA.

"Professor of Biology Discusses West Nile Dangers,"
WTAJ-TV, Oct. 1, 2012

 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania went the extra mile for its new president. And vice versa. Michael Driscoll assumed his duties on July 1 - after completing the 6,600-mile journey from his previous assignment as chief academic officer and provost at the University of Alaska-Anchorage.

"IUP chief makes way from Alaska,"
Altoona Mirror, Oct. 1, 2012

 

A Franklin County student has earned a scholarship for her study at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Academy of Culinary Arts, based in Punxsutawney. Sarahjane Lopez, daughter of Carl and Pamela Lopez, St. Thomas-Williamson Road, Chambersburg, is the 2012 recipient of the Tony and Emma Ricupero Memorial-Rustic Lodge Scholarship. She is a 2011 graduate of James Buchanan High School, Mercersburg. As part of her studies at the academy, Lopez is completing an externship at The Breakers in West Palm Beach, Fla. At the academy, she has earned high honors, the perfect attendance award and dean's list honors. To be eligible for the award, recipients must have a grade-point average of at least 3.5 and be entering their third semester at the academy. The scholarship was established in 2001 by members of the Ricupero and Lubold families to honor Tony and Emma Ricupero's reputation in the food service industry for hard work, high-quality service, customer satisfaction and service to the community.

"Graduate of James Buchanan High School in Mercersburg earns scholarship at Academy of Culinary Arts,"
Chambersburg Public Opinion, Sept. 28, 2012

 

State universities in Pennsylvania could soon get a front-row seat on the Marcellus Shale industry. "This distribution formula provides equitable funding and promotes our efforts to maintain and improve Pennsylvania's environment and infrastructure improvement efforts," said the bill's principal sponsor, Sen. Don White, a Republican whose district includes Indiana University of Pennsylvania."

"Newly passed bill will allow mining and drilling near state-owned institutions,"
Philadelphia Inquirer, Sept. 26, 2012

 

INDIANA — For the fourth consecutive year, Indiana University of Pennsylvania has broken all previous total student enrollment records with a fall 2012 enrollment of 15,379. Total enrollment, which comprises undergraduate and graduate students, increased by 247 students, or 1.6 percent, over last fall’s 15,132.

"IUP breaks enrollment records,"
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, Sept. 26, 2012

 

The concept of Home Economics was created in the late 1800s; and according to expert, Dr. Sally McCombie of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, it was given the negative term of “Stitchin’ and Stewin’.” Of course, it was a time when women stayed at home and men were the bread winners. “Then, the women’s movement came in the 70s,” Dr. McCombie told KDKA’s Heather Abraham during an interview at Indiana High School. “And that’s where we really saw a shift. We started to push women towards careers and getting them ready for careers.” Dr. McCombie said what was lost after the movement were valuable life lessons. There was the opinion that day-to-day responsibilities were something that would be taught at home, but that wasn’t necessarily true. Then, there was a push to modify home economics as it was and modernize it. “In 1994, there was a big turnaround. We changed our name to Family and Consumer Sciences to better show what we do,” said Dr. McCombie.

"Home Economics Classes Still Teaching Boys and Girls Valuable Life Lessons,"
KDKA-TV (Pittsburgh), Sept. 26, 2012

 

Each year America's Promise Alliance reveals the 100 Best Communities for Young People, as presented by ING. According to APA's website, the list is comprised of "100 deserving communities who effectively provide their youth with the Five Promises and work to increase graduation rates. Winning communities come from all across the country and are addressing the unique challenges they face."

"America's Promise Alliance Presents 11 Of The Best U.S. Communities For LGBT Youth,"
Huffpost Gay Voices, Sept. 13, 2012

 

Pennsylvania Secretary of the Commonwealth Carol Aichele brought her public relations campaign on the new voter identification law to Pittsburgh's suburbs today, as part of efforts to publicize the new requirements statewide before Election Day. Ms. Aichele spoke to a class of 25 seniors at Chartiers Valley High School on the measure requiring voters to show voter ID at the polls, which is among the strictest such laws in the nation. She was tailed by CNN news crew, will speak later to radio show in Beaver County and tomorrow to college students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"Pennsylvania Secretary of the Commonwealth touts voter ID law in Pittsburgh suburbs,"
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Sept. 12, 2012

 

Indiana County, a three-time 100 Best winner, remains focused on improving health, life and academic outcomes for area youth and their families. To promote youth health, LifeSteps, an organization that serves individuals with disabilities or special needs, offers Child Check, which screens and monitors all areas of a child’s development from birth to age five. Project Fit America works to combat childhood obesity and help youth lead healthy lives by teaching them how to take responsibility for their own health. Indiana County’s Children’s Advisory Committee identifies needs of young people and their families, and provides opportunities for growth through partnerships with educational systems, human services, juvenile justice systems, faith-based organizations and community leaders. Community Programs Indiana County’s Children’s Advisory Committee identifies the needs of the community’s youth by enhancing communications and collaboration among educational systems, human services, juvenile justice systems, faith-based organizations and community members. LifeSteps , an organization that serves individuals with disabilities or special needs, provides Child Check, a program that screens children’s development from birth to age five. Project Fit America seeks to reverse lack of fitness in youth and teach children how to take personal responsibility for their health. Safe Zone , a program created by the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, improves visibility and support for LGBT students and employees. The Salvation Army’s Ark of Learning® tutoring program matches adults from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania with youth to assist in their school work.

"America's Promise Alliance,"
KDKA-TV (Pittsburgh), Sept. 12, 2012

 

Eleven years after the 9/11 attacks, the only victim from Johnstown will soon have a special tribute. William Moskal was inside the World Trade Center when planes crashed into the towers. Being from the city’s west end, Moskal went to Greater Johnstown High School and graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"Memorial Planned for Johnstown Native, 9/11 Victim,"
Gant.com, Johnstown, Pa., Sept. 11, 2012

 

Amanda Avvento, of Tobyhanna, a sports administration major at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, was selected to serve as an orientation leader for the university's 2012 Welcome Weekend events. Avvento, daughter of Florence and Joseph Avvento, is a 2008 graduate of Pocono Mountain West High School. IUP orientation leaders help to mentor more than 3,000 freshman students during their first weekend at IUP, helping to smooth the transition to college life. Events during the university's Welcome Weekend include tours of university buildings and offices and Freshman Convocation, the university's formal welcome to new students. While at IUP, she is a Chacivity award recipient and Most Valuable Player. Avvento is a defensive player for the rugby team. She initiated the Education Club in Punxsutawny, was a member of the Activities Club, volunteered for the Punxsutawny 5k charity event and autism and breast cancer awareness events. She is a member of the Sports Administration Club and the IUP Ambassadors.

"Avvento to serve as orientation leader,"
Pocono Record, Sept. 11, 2012

 

A former Johnstown man who died in the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, will be remembered along with two other Indiana University of Pennsylvania alumni at a program Tuesday at the campus in Indiana.

"IUP’s Sept. 11 program to honor Johnstown native,"
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, Sept. 6, 2012

 

When it comes to school spirit, there are many factors that go into getting fans ready for games, but nothing is greater than a good mascot. Indiana University of Pennsylvania is one of those schools that has a tougher process that includes tryouts. “During the tryout, the students trying out must perform a 30-second skit or dance to music of their choice,” said Peter Shoop, Assistant Director of Recreation at IUP. “The tryout also entails working with props, and interview with the mascot and showing school spirit.” "Mascots play a key role in college sporting events,"

"IUP’s Sept. 11 program to honor Johnstown native,"
Harrisburg Patriot-News, Sept. 2, 2012

 

Think global. Study local. Higher education now covers the world, addressing massive challenges: sustainability, new energy solutions, digital media, information technology, international trade, medical breakthroughs and much more. Major corporations are moving onto campus, too, pulling students into new research and ventures. Here are some CliffsNotes on how regional colleges are jumping in to prepare students for the most promising careers of the next decade. Health Care: Nursing a Nation Booming as always, the health-care industry continues to influence undergraduate and graduate studies. At Indiana University of Pennsylvania, students enrolled in the nursing program go through community health training (including a clinical rotation). High-Powered: Fueling Jobs Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s new track for Energy Resources within the department of Geoscience blends course work in environmental studies, geospatial mapping and geographic information systems, and safety science. The program, which was introduced last year, offers students a range of course work applicable to energy careers. Professor Steve Hovan, the department chair, adds that it’s not just grads with geology and earth science degrees who are in demand; nearly 24 students have already chosen the new track, and Hovan says that overall enrollment in geology majors has nearly doubled in the past four years.

"10 Hot Fields of Study,"
Pittsburgh Magazine, September 2012

 

Colleges and universities are using Facebook and Twitter to help incoming students get comfortable with their new life. Officials at some colleges create Facebook pages for students to join as soon as they’re accepted, while others create informational pages to keep students up-to-date. The comfort that teens have with social networking is the main impetus for colleges to use Facebook to reach out to incoming students, said Katie Motycki, assistant director for orientation at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. “A lot of our social media efforts are coming because if they’re doing it this way, we might as well embrace it,” Motycki said. “We want to reach them and communicate with them in the ways they want to be reached.” Among the several social media pages at IUP, students can “like” a page for the university’s office of housing and residence life to ask information about dorm life and activities. More than 1,900 people “like” that page. Motycki said the university also used Twitter during its orientation program this year, encouraging freshmen to use the hashtag “#new2IUP” to connect with other freshmen at the two-day seminar. “There’s always the issue that they don’t know anybody else because the place is so big,” Motycki said. “Facebook allows them to connect with the new people in their lives, but stay connected with the people they’re leaving behind.”

"Social media ease transition for students at Western Pa. colleges,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Aug. 29, 2012

 

As state funding waned and the economy soured, universities belonging to the State System of Higher Education typically could count on something other than mere cost-cutting to get them through hard times. Year after year, rising enrollment brought in sorely needed revenue, creating the appearance in some cases that those schools could grow their way out of trouble. But after 14 years of uninterrupted growth, the pattern has changed. Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the largest of the State System schools, does not anticipate a decline, spokeswoman Michelle Fryling said. The university expects to at least match last year's total enrollment of 15,132 and to match last year's freshman class of 2,901.

"PA universities expects declining enrollment,"
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Aug. 27, 2012

 

South Fork resident and 1989 Shade graduate Sean Wechtenhiser took over the high school principal position at Shade-Central City school district July 2. He replaced Allan Berkhimer, who accepted a job at a school district in Indiana County. Wechtenhiser is preparing for the upcoming school year. The new principal received his bachelor's degree in secondary education from Lock Haven University in December 1994 and a master's degree in education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in August 2003. He followed those degrees up with his principal's certificate from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in August 2006.

"Shade graduate now principal at alma mater,"
Somerset Daily American, Aug. 22, 2012

 

Indiana University head diving coach Dr. Jeff Huber announced today that John Wingfield has joined the IU staff as assistant coach. Since August 2009, Wingfield has served as director of the National Training Center and head coach for USA Diving. In that position he has identified, developed and trained 12 elite USA divers and created and shared with USA Diving membership quadrennial and annual training plans for divers from the Junior Elite through Olympic levels. Prior to joining USA Diving, Wingfield spent 10 seasons as Director of Aquatics and head diving coach at Ball State. During that time he coaches 21 Mid-American Conference title winners, four NCAA All-Americans and was named MAC Coach of the Year on seven occasions. Wingfield earned B.S. degrees in Management Information Systems (1985) and Health and Physical Education (1988) from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and an M.S. in Sport Science in 1988.

"IU Names Wingfield Assistant Diving Coach,"
CollegeSwimming.com, Aug. 21, 2012

 

Some students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania at Northpointe, located in Slate Lick, will be enrolling in a new four-year major offered at the campus –marketing – when the fall semester begins next week. The course is also available at the IUP main campus in Indiana, Pa. but Associate Professor of Marketing Dr. Parimal Bhagat, Chair of the Marketing Department, said the new degree was established in order to better serve the students in the local area.

"IUP-Northpointe Offering Marketing Degree Starting Next Week,"
The Kittanning Paper, Aug. 20, 2012

 

Kaitlyn Mae-Lea Keller, Pine Grove, graduated cum laude from Indiana University of Pennsylvania on May 12 with a bachelor's degree in nursing. She is a member of Alpha Tau Delta, Delta Epsilon Iota Academic Honor Society, Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society and Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing.

"Graduates,"
Pottstown Republican Herald, Aug. 19, 2012

 

Three students from Monroe County graduated in May from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Students include Victoria Ashely Cassar of East Stroudsburg, Bachelor of Science in hospitality management; Amber Ann Bittiger of Saylorsburg, Bachelor of Science in education in English education; and Raymond Marcuss Smith of Stroudsburg, Bachelor of Arts in criminology/pre-law; and Matthew Gilbert Walter of Stroudsburg, Bachelor of Arts in economics.

"Campus notes,"
Pocono Record, Aug. 14, 2012

 

Angelica Dunsavage graduated summa cum laude with a 4.0 GPA for her entire undergraduate degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and the Robert E. Cook Honors College and was also named to the dean's list for the fall and spring semesters. A Provost Scholar, she is a music education major with a primary concentration on voice and minors in German and piano. Angelica was a member of the IUP Chamber Singers and Chorale and also served as president and vice president, clarinet choir, PCMEA, NATS, Opera Workshop and the America Choral Directors Association. "College Notes,"

Aug. 12, 2012
Pottstown Republican Herald, Aug. 10, 2012

 

Ogoreuc, also director of aquatics at SRU and the school's former swimming coach, is an Indiana, Pa., native and graduate of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where he was on the swim team.

"Do not drown," Local expert offers tips to stay safe,"
(Grove City) Allied News, Aug. 10, 2012

GREENCASTLE - Rebecca Florentine, Greencastle, a baking and pastry student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Academy of Culinary Arts, is completing studies at the academy with a professional externship at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort, Farmington.

"Greencastle-Antrim graduate earns honors, gets professional externship,"
Chambersburg Public Opinion, Aug. 7, 2012

 

Directors voted July 24 to replace solicitor Maiello Brungo & Maiello, LLP with Donald Palmer of Goehring, Rutter & Boehm. A magna cum laude graduate of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania where he earned a bachelor's degree in political science, Mr. Palmer received his juris doctor from Duquesne University School of Law in 1986. He is permitted to practice in the state Supreme Court, the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania and the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. A former associate counsel with the state Department of Education and an adjunct professor at Duquesne, he is the appointed solicitor for the Woodland Hills School District and the zoning hearing boards in Adams and Findlay townships.

"Chartiers Valley replaces longtime solicitor,"
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Aug. 2, 2012

 

Rachel C. Campbell, daughter of Mark and Dona Campbell of Ford City, was named to the spring 2012 semester dean’s list at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Campbell majored in English education and graduated from IUP on May 12. She is a 2007 graduate of Ford City High School.

"Campbell listed by IUP this spring,"
Kittanning Leader Times, July 30, 2012

 

It’s not often that the state House and Senate come together to do anything unanimously. They did just that in passing badly needed reforms that will benefit the 14 universities in the State System of Higher Education. More importantly, the changes, billed as the most sweeping since the system’s formation in 1982, should ultimately help students and their parents by keeping down tuition and other costs in obtaining an education. As reported by The Philadelphia Inquirer, new laws clear the way for the universities to raise more revenue by offering doctorates and allowing professors to “commercialize” their research of new products to financially benefit both themselves and their schools. Among those who can take advantage of the changes is Indiana University of Pennsylvania, which, by the way, remains the only school in the system that can offer a doctor of philosophy degree.

"Higher ed overhaul,"
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, July 26, 2012

 

SOUTH BUFFALO -- The robot-building team of Issac Beck and Caleb Bowser was stumped -- but that didn't last for long. The miniature, computer programmed mobile robot they had built for a run at an obstacle course competition on Thursday during the week-long Penn State Electro-Optics Center sponsored summer robotics camp for middle school boys and girls at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Northpointe Campus in South Buffalo wouldn't follow the black line.

"South Buffalo robotics camp puts fun into science,"
Kittanning Leader-Times, July 19, 2012

 

HUGHESVILLE - Welcome Nancy Hodge to the Luminary! She is a familiar face to many who live here. Born and raised in Hughesville, Hodge is the daughter of Bruce and Martha Starr. One of her strongest passions in life is music. So when she graduated from Hughesville High School in 1971, Nancy pursued a career in music education at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"New correspondent joins Luminary,"
Muncy (PA), July 17, 2012

 

Chris Taylor Noteworthy: Taylor, a member of Irwin Moose Lodge 236, will receive the Pilgrim Degree of Merit at a ceremony in Illinois in August. Of all Moose lodge members in the world, fewer than one-half of 1 percent receive the honor. Those who do are considered in the Moose “hall of fame.” Occupation: Self-employed in the telecommunications industry. Education: Bachelor of Science degree in business, Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"Newsmaker: Chris Taylor,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 17, 2012

 

Stephanie Phillips of Carlisle received a $1,000 academic scholarship by the National Society of Accountants Scholarship Foundation. Phillips is a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"On Campus,"
Harrisburg Patriot-News, July 12, 2012

 

Alumna Amanda Poole, AU Class of 1997, assistant professor anthropology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, writes that she is currently developing and conducting a field school for graduate and undergraduate students to perform qualitative research on the impacts of Marcellus Shale.

"AU News,"
Alfred University, July 11, 2012

 

WAYNESBORO - Carla Plummer, Waynesboro, has been selected for a Board of Governors academic achievement scholarship at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Only 5 percent of the IUP freshman class is selected for the awards, offered on the basis of academic achievement and promise. Plummer, daughter of Sam and Regina Plummer, is a 2012 graduate of Waynesboro Area Senior High School. While in high school, she won Elks, College Club and Alpha Delta Kappa scholarships. She has been a member of National Honor Society, National English Honor Society, Student Council, Executive Council, Indians and Maidens Club, Young Humanitarians, Young Life, band and choir. She is involved in St. Andrews Youth Group and Fellowship of Christian Athletes and is a Mowery Elementary School monitor and a volunteer at the New Hope Homeless Shelter and The Lunch Place.

"Waynesboro's Plummer wins Board of Governors scholarship,"
Chambersburg Public Opinion, July 11, 2012

 

Those of who worked with Sue Snyder weren't surprised that she was part of the team that won the Inquirer's Pulitzer Prize for reporting on violence in Philadelphia public schools. She works harder than almost anyone. In a business where being cranky is a common personality trait, Sue is always a pleasure. Her kind, straightforward manner undoubtedly helps her win sources.For any parents out there worried that children must be high achievers from the moment they enter preschool, read Sue Snyder's story and calm down.What follows is a copy of the graduation speech Sue gave not too long ago to the journalism school at her alma mater, Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"The power of underachievers,"
Philadelphia Inquirer, July 10, 2012

 

The Board of Governors of the State System of Higher Education kept its commitment to hold tuition rates at the rate of inflation. The board approved tuition at $6,428 a year, a 3 percent increase, during a special meeting on Monday. Indiana University of Pennsylvania has been planning for a variety of budget scenarios as they awaited the tuition rate approval, said Michelle Fryling, IUP spokeswoman.

"State universities hold tuition increase to 3% inflation rate,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 9, 2012

 

UFCW Federal Credit Union presented the Annual Norman G. Fulkerson Scholarship Award to Alexandra Jayne. She plans to attend the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"UFCW scholarship presented to Jayne,"
Pittston Sunday Dispatch, July 8, 2012

 

The following students from Monroe County have been named to the spring 2012 dean's list at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Students achieve dean's list status when they are full-time (12 or more credits) with a grade point average of 3.25 or higher.

"Campus Notes,"
Pocono Record, July 6, 2012

 

Education: I graduated from Tunkhannock Area High School, earned a bachelor's of science in music education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and hold a master's of music performance in both tuba and conducting from Illinois State University, Normal, Ill.

"In Our Schools: Steven Holgate,"
Reading Eagle, July 2, 2012

 

In the mid 1980’s four local guys got together at Indiana University of Pennsylvania to “give rock and roll a try.” Nearly 30 years later, The Clarks are still together and still giving it a go.

"The Clarks Are Still Rockin',"
Essential Public Radio, June 29, 2012

 

Indiana County Commissioner Rod Ruddock said sustaining programs such as the food pantries gets "tougher every day" as the county finds itself subject to ever-tightening funding limitations. But, he expressed thanks for local organizations that have pitched in to help -- like the annual drive spearheaded by Indiana University of Pennsylvania's culinary department. This year the drive generated $3,600 plus donations of food for the ICCAP program.

"Indiana County officials eye comprehensive plan," ,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 28, 2012

 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania computer science major Courtney Wirtz finished third at the Northeastern United States Chinese Proficiency Competition for Foreign College Students. She is a daughter of Jan Wirtz and Carl H. Wirtz Jr. and a 2008 graduate of West Mifflin Area High School.

"Awards,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 27, 2012

 

Chris Lamonde is learning a lot about 19th-century Indiana County. The Penn Hills native, 23, has been working with two other graduate students from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania in a service learning project under the direction of IUP's history graduate program coordinator, Dr. Jeanine Mazak-Kahne. Lamonde is working with unopened court records and other written materials collected by the Historical and Genealogical Society of Indiana County, processing them and making them available for research.

"Penn Hills native delves into Indiana County history,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 27, 2012

 

Noteworthy: Botelho, an Indiana University of Pennsylvania history professor, has received a Fulbright-King’s College London Scholar Award, which will allow her to do research at King’s College London from January through July.

"Newsmaker: Lynn Botelho,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review,June 22, 2012

 

Sara Elizabeth Beard of Enola was recognized as a member of Sigma Alpha Lambda, National Leadership and Honors Organization at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"On campus,"
Harrisburg Patriot-News, June 22, 2012

 

FREEPORT, Bahamas -- Steve Loar, Professor of Art at Indiana University of Pennsylvania brought his top eleven students from his Three Dimensional Design class to Grand Bahama Island invited by The Keep Grand Bahama Clean Committee and Cristina Zenato, UNEXSO.

"One Island Art Remediation Workshop and Marine Sculpture unveiled at UNEXSO,"
Grant Bahama News, June 21, 2012

 

INDIANA, Pa. (AP) - Indiana University of Pennsylvania is searching for a developer to build a hotel near a $79 million, 5,000-seat athletic arena and convention complex that opened last year.

"Pa.-owned university seeks developer for hotel,"
Carlisle Sentinel, June 16, 2012

 

The group of visiting college art students from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and their professor, Steve Loar will host an Open House at UNEXSO today at 4:00 p.m., showcasing the art work they constructed from recycled plastic that was collected from beaches on the island. "This group that is here is working for their credit and we are working together for two weeks under the theme, 'Recycle Plastic,'"?said Loar. He added that they are working with UNEXSO, which is sponsoring the group, "and we are making them a seascape with a theme of sharks," he explained.

"One Island Open House set for today at UNEXSO"
The Freeport News (Grand Bahama), June 16, 2012

 

SHIPPENSBURG - Abby Bender, Shippensburg, received the Theater by the Grove Freshman Talent Scholarship for 2012-13 at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The daughter of Kevin and Nancy Bender, she is a 2012 graduate of Shippensburg Area Senior High School.

"Bender receives talent scholarship for IUP,"
Chambersburg Public Opinion, June 16, 2012

 

PUNXSUTAWNEY - Several area culinary students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Academy of Culinary Arts, Punxsutawney, were named to the 2012 spring dean's recognition list. They are: Michael Barry, Aaron Barrick and Sarahjane Lopez, all of Chambersburg; Rebecca Florentine and Isaac Seidel, both of Greencastle; and Matthew Wilhide and Robert Fehle, both of Waynesboro. They had at least 3.25 grade point averages. The academy is one of 112 programs in the United States fully accredited by the American Culinary Federation-the maximum accreditation possible for culinary programs in the United States.

"IUP culinary students named to dean's list,"
Chambersburg Public Opinion, June 16, 2012

 

INDIANA, Pa. (AP) - Indiana University of Pennsylvania is searching for a developer to build a hotel near a $79 million, 5,000-seat athletic arena and convention complex that opened last year.

"Pa.-owned university seeks developer for hotel,"
WFMJ-TV (Youngstown, Ohio), June 15, 2012

 

A Pottsville artist was one of 115 selected to display their work in the Art of the State: Pennsylvania 2012 exhibition that opens to the public Sunday at The State Museum of Pennsylvania in Harrisburg. Audrey Bordonaro said she never expected to be selected when she entered her abstract painting titled "Migration" in the exhibition, which aims to showcase the talent, creativity and diversity of Pennsylvania's established and emerging artists. Bordonaro studied Interior Design at Pratt Institute and finished a bachelors degree in Art Education at Indiana University of Pennsylvania before working for the Blue Mountain School District for 36 years.

"Pottsville artist's work selected for state exhibition in Harrisburg,"
Pottsville Republican, June 15, 2012

 

In this presentation, award-winning performer and educator Paula Purnell demonstrates a host of homemade musical instruments while sharing songs from Pennsylvania's past at 7:30 p.m. June 25, at the Folk Meeting House in Springs. Purnell is an educator and musician from Greensburg. She is cofounder of Sense of Place Learning, and affiliate partner of the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh. Purnell teaches education courses at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and presents workshops and professional development classes on regional history, folk music and arts integration.

"Purnell to present homemade music in Pennsylvania,"
Somerset Daily American, June 15, 2012

 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania is now accepting bids from developers to build a hotel near its new convention complex. The $79 million, 5,000-seat Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Center opened last March. The school planned on opening a hotel around the same time, but could not reach a deal with a developer. The Indiana Gazette reports the school will not have any role in the hotel's operations.

"Indiana Univ. of Pa. accepting bids to build hotel near convention center,"
WJAC-TV (Johnstown-Altoona), June 15, 2012

 

EBENSBURG — Bryan Beppler of Johnstown has been named by the Cambria County commissioners as the county’s human resources director. He succeeds Ron Baker, who resigned in April. Beppler, who had been the assistant director since 2007, has been filling in as interim director. His salary was increased to $65,000 a year, up $12,470 from his current $52,530 a year. President Commissioner Douglas Lengenfelder said Beppler’s salary still is below what Baker was making. He was paid $68,346. Beppler began working for the county in 2006 as payroll supervisor at Laurel Crest, the county’s former nursing home. He is a graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania and received a master’s degree from St. Francis University.

"Commissioners promote 2 employees,"
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, June 14, 2012

 

Molly Plank of Littlestown, a member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, helped to raise more than $3,000 for Autism Speaks, the largest autism-awareness organization in the nation. Plank, the daughter of Steve and Lisa Plank, is a 2010 graduate of Littlestown High School and a sports administration major at IUP.

"Molly Plank autism fundraiser,"
Gettysburg Times, June 11, 2012

 

Nick Hoffman has been promoted to grant coordinator by the Regional Center for Workforce Excellence. Hoffman has been with the organization for five years, serving as coordinator of several regional committees. A graduate of Franklin Area High School, Hoffman earned a bachelor's degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. In his new position, Hoffman will be responsible for overseeing a multi-agency coordination effort for a $1.2 million Deparment of Labor training grant.

"People on the Move,"
Erie Times-News, June 10, 2012

 

Jared David Adams of Forest Hills has “Steaming Through,” an acrylic featuring a steam locomotive, and an untitled acrylic. He will study graphic design at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Scholarship recipients who did not submit work to the show are Abigail Yesenko of Forest Hills, who will study graphic design at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh; Pauline Johncola of Bishop McCort Catholic, who will study art education and studio art at IUP; and Avery Wood of Bishop McCort Catholic, who will study graphic design at IUP.

"Summer exhibition 'Allied Artists' show has just about everything,"
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, June 10, 2012

 

These are excerpts from a commencement speech given on May 12 at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's journalism department, of which Susan Snyder is a 1985 graduate. Susan Snyder is an Inquirer staff writer and winner of a 2012 Pulitzer Prize. The theme of my speech is simple: Anything is possible if you care enough, if you work very hard, and if you persist.

"Persistence and drive will win the race for you,"
Philadelphia Inquirer, June 10, 2012

 

Joie Strong, a 2012 Shenandoah Valley High School graduate, was chosen as student of the month for May by the Shenandoah Rotary Club. A daughter of Joseph and Dawn Strong, Shenandoah, she plans to attend Indiana University of Pennsylvania and major in psychology.

"Students of the month,"
Pottsville Republican Herald, June 10, 2012

 

Noteworthy: Hayley Foster received Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic's Making-A-Difference Award at a ceremony last month. Age: 29; Residence: A McKeesport native, Foster recently moved to Butler. Occupation: Foster is a service coordinator at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. She works with the chronically homeless in the Neighborhood Living Project, a program that uses grants to secure housing for those in need. In her free time, she volunteers to help her clients go to the food bank and offers them cooking classes. Education: Foster received a bachelor's degree in child development and family relations from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2004. She is attending IUP to earn her master's degree in community counseling. Quote: "I feel very honored, though I feel it's really what my job entails. It's just part of my job.

"Newsmaker: Hayley Foster,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 7, 2012

 

INDIANA, Pa. - A Waynesboro student was part of a project that raised more than $3,650 and more than 900 pounds of food through Indiana University of Pennsylvania's department of food and nutrition 18th annual food drive. Leslie Stine, daughter of Scott Stine and Alison Stine, assisted and is a dietetics major and dean's list student at IUP. She is a 2008 graduate of Waynesboro Area Senior High School and has been a member of the IUP cheerleading squad.The event, Community Nutrition Food Drive: Neighbors Helping Neighbors, is a service-learning project organized by students in the community nutrition class and by dietetic interns. What was collected helps needy Indiana County residents.

"Waynesboro student assists with food drive at Indiana University of Pennsylvania,"
Chambersburg Public Opinion, June 7, 2012

 

Rebecca Reed of Scranton, was part of a project raising more than $3,650 and collecting more than 900 pounds of food through Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Department of Food and Nutrition 18th annual Community Nutrition Food Drive: Neighbors Helping Neighbors. Rebecca, daughter of Paul and Petra Reed, is a dietetics major at IUP and a 2008 graduate of Riverside Junior-Senior High School.

"Namedropper - Super Students"
Scranton Times-Tribune, June 6, 2012

 

Two Erie County students have been inducted into the Mortar Board National College Senior Honor Society at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Those students are Megan Niswonger, of Edinboro, and Phylis A. Zimmermann-Theuerkauf, of Erie. Niswonger is a nutrition/dietetics major at Indiana University, a member of the equestrian team and a member of several student organizations. She is a 2009 graduate of General McLane High School and the daughter of Mark and Patricia Niswonger. Zimmerman-Theuerkauf is a vocational-technical education major and a member of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, American Federation of Teachers and SkillsUSA. Mortar Board membership is open to college juniors who demonstrate excellence in scholarship, student leadership and community service.

"College Clan,"
Erie Times-News, June 4, 2012

 

Dana Doctorick Noteworthy: Named Monongahela Valley Hospital's Cameos of Caring honoree on May 10 which recognizes exceptional bedside nurses working in acute care hospitals.Occupation: Registered nurse in the intensive care unit of Monongahela Valley Hospital, Monongahela. Education: Received bachelor of science degree from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2007.

"Newsmaker: Dana Doctorick,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review,June 3, 2012

 

Two 4-H alumni served as judges for this year's contest, Rachel Hicks of DuBois and Morgan Dubensky of Punxsutawney. Hicks is a former Clearfield County 4-H member and currently a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania Academy of Culinary Arts where she is specializing in baking and pastry.

"Clearfield and Jefferson counties host public speaking contest,"
Clearfield Progress, June 2, 2012

 

Executive Director Hugh Daly is scheduled to retire on Sept. 25 after 12 years on the job. The retirement would be the fourth or fifth of his social services career, a trend that is seemingly lifelong for the DuBois resident. After all, there will always be someone in need. Daly earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a master's degree in communication from Clarion University, and served four years in the U.S. Air Force at the beginning of the Vietnam War.

"DuBois man ends long career in social services,"
Clearfield Progress, June 2, 2012

 

Some of you may remember the name Leon Stennis, The Vindicator’s former religion editor and reporter. For those who don’t know him, let me introduce you to a man who has overcome some daunting personal challenges to achieve a lifelong goal — earning his doctoral degree in English at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, which he received last month.

"A role model for overcoming the odds,"
Youngstown (Ohio) Vindecator, June 2, 2012

 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania exercise science– pre-physical therapy major Jesse Smartt recently received the 2012 Dr. Eugene E. Lepley Memorial Scholarship. The memorial scholarship, established in 1990, is in honor of Dr. Lepley for his many contributions in the promotion of health and fitness to both the university and Indiana community.

"Receives Scholarship,"
Fulton County News, May 31, 2012

 

Colby Staples is the daughter of Theodore and Laurie Staples and plans to study respiratory therapy at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.Colby is a 4-year member of Club Hope and power puff football; 3-year member of peer leadership; 2-year member of National Honors Society and the varsity softball team; 1-year as sophomore class treasurer and junior class vice president; she also participates in the youth softball league and her church youth group.

"It's Graduation Day for Lincoln High,"
Ellwood City News, May 31, 2012

 

IUP Alums Killed In Vietnam Remembered.

"Dave Crawley's Neighborhood,"
KDKA-TV (Pittsburgh), May 31, 2012

 

Houston Swope, of Erie, has been selected for a Board of Governors academic achievement scholarship at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Only 5 percent of the IUP freshman class is selected for these awards, which are offered on the basis of academic achievement and promise. Swope, son of John and Jeanne Swope, will graduate from McDowell Senior High School. While in high school, he was a member of the football team his sophomore and junior year. He also volunteered at the Second Harvest Food Bank.

"College Clan,"
Erie Times-News, May 28, 2012

 

Fifth- and sixth-graders led by two Indiana University of Pennsylvania art students are building a 5-foot-tall octopus, mounds of coral, fish and other ocean animals entirely out of recyclable materials, most of which they brought from home. The "Octopus Garden" will open for a public gallery walk at 7 p.m. today. It's expected to become a permanent installment in the Norwin school's courtyard. The project, led by Norwin graduates Kayla Ihrig and Brandon McDonald, studio art majors at IUP, is designed to teach students concepts such as contrasting and complementary colors while demonstrating how old items can be reused to create works of art.

"Norwin students immerse themselves in art project,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 23, 2012

 

Diane Galbraith was named a 2012 Teaching Excellence Award winner for the Slippery Rock University's Accreditation Council of Business Schools and Programs in Region 2. Galbraith has taught and advised traditional and nontraditional students for Carlow University, Geneva College and Slippery Rock University in the areas of business and management. She is a member of the Society for Human Resource Management, the Society for the Advancement of Management and the Pittsburgh Professional Women. Doctorate in education leadership from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

"Newsmakers: Diane D. Galbraith,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 22, 2012

 

Sarah Munson told the Montgomery County Community College Class of 2012 May 17 to be proud to say they are graduates of the school, considering the hard work each person put in to finish his or her degree. Graduate Samantha Berk said all of her efforts were “worth it” and she is looking forward to her future. “I put in more effort than I ever have and I think I succeeded. I’m very proud of myself,” said Berk, who is graduating with a degree in secondary education and will attend the Indiana University of Pennsylvania next year. "

Montgomery County Community College graduates largest class in school history,"
Ambler Gazette-Montgomery County News, May 22, 2012

 

In the meantime, (Alex) Neff had to send a deposit to one of his three other options by May 1 or potentially end up with none of them. Instead of scheduling campus visits to help him decide, he sat down to examine financial aid packages. By the dollar signs, IUP emerged the clear winner. Between grants and federal loans, Neff said he'll be responsible for about half of the estimated $20,000 annual tuition and living expenses -- about $7,000 less than he would pay at Altoona. Neff said he was surprised that financial aid packages varied enough to become a deciding factor, especially since he'd made a point of picking affordable state schools. West Chester's still "my No. 1," he said, but "I'm pretty content with IUP." He "toured" the campus by clicking through online photos and spoke to Central graduates who went there.

—"Sealing the College Deal"
Jewish Exponent, May 17, 2012

 

For the last five weeks several officers from Clearfield and Jefferson County have been undergoing training through the Right Turn Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program.  On Wednesday afternoon police officers, probation officers and corrections officers graduated from the program at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania campus in Punxsutawney.  The group of officers is the inaugural class of officers trained through the program in Clearfield and Jefferson County. 

—"Area officers complete crisis intervention training program"
WJAC-TV (NBC affiliate), May 16, 2012

 

Two local students have been selected for membership in Indiana University of Pennsylvania's chapter of Phi Kappa Phi National Honor Society. The students include: Sonya C. Eppley, Jerome, is a 1990 graduate of Conemaugh Township Junior/Senior High School, and a 1994 graduate of Juniata College. A candidate in the speech-language pathology masters program at IUP, she is a member of the National Student Speech-Language Hearing Association at IUP. Tessa Marie Minnick, Meyersdale, daughter of Robert and Amy Minnick, is a 2006 graduate of Meyersdale Area High School. A safety sciences major in the masters program at IUP, she is a member of the American Society of Safety Engineers, a National Safety Council member and a member of Ladies of Safety. She is also a member of Rho Sigma Kappa, a wellgates scholar, and winner of the Mid-Atlantic Construction Safety Council scholarship in 2009. Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's oldest honor society for all academic disciplines, with 300 chapters throughout the nation. IUP's chapter was founded in 1993. 

—"Two inducted into IUP honor society"
Somerset Daily American, May 14, 2012

 

The YWCA of Greater Johnstown will honor nine women from the area for their contributions to the community during the 26th annual Tribute to Women on May 31. Aspen Brianna Mock of Windber is the recipient of the Arts and Letters Award. Mock, an English teacher in the Forest Hills School District, is the daughter of Terry and Elsie Mock of Windber. Her favorite teaching topics are Shakespeare, writing and dramatic literature. After receiving bachelor’s degrees in English literature and theater from Pitt-Johnstown, Mock earned a master’s degree in English education at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—"Tribute to Women: YWCA will honor nine for community service"
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, May 13, 2012

 

Amanda, now 22, will tell you story upon story of her dad - how he struggled after the accident to do something as simple as brush his teeth, or get a drink of water or shuffle a deck of cards. And she'll look back on her freshman year at IUP and admit it without hesitation. Amanda had gone off to western Pennsylvania that fall with an interest in biology and anatomy, and was looking to do something in the medical field, perhaps as a rehabilitation specialist. But after the accident, the thought of being four hours away and unable to help, well at first it just all seemed like too much. Until that talk with her mom, she said. And until she thought again of her dad. "I was like, 'Dad doesn't give up,'" she said. "So I kept going, too." On a sunny Saturday, May 12, 2012, Amanda Glatfelter received her degree in exercise science, the first in her family to graduate from college.

—"Crash, coma and two hard-won graduations"
(Hanover) Evening Sun, May 13, 2012

A graduating student from Indiana University of Pennsylvania is the first recipient of the Stephen J. Mayhle Memorial Scholarship. "Being the first person to get this is a great honor," said Patrick Lee, 22, who was presented with the scholarship award at commencement exercises on Saturday. More than 2,250 graduates were eligible to participate in IUP graduation ceremonies. Stephen J. Mayhle was one of three officers killed in a Stanton Heights shootout with Richard Poplawski in April 2009. Officers Paul J. Sciullo II and Eric Kelly also were shot and killed. Mayhle grew up in Indiana and was a graduate of IUP. "This is really important for us. We are excited to award it. It is nice to have something good come out of a tragedy. This is a good way to honor his memory," said Randy Martin, chairman of IUP's criminology department, which has 1,000 students and is the largest single department at any state-owned university.

—"Award honoring slain Pittsburgh officer given to IUP grad,"
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 12, 2012

 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania today will present the first scholarship honoring Stephen Mayhle, a 2002 criminology graduate and Pittsburgh police officer slain April 4, 2009, in the line of duty. The first Stephen Mayhle Memorial Scholarship recipient is Patrick Allen Lee, a 2012 IUP criminology graduate from Uniontown. The presentation will be made during the criminology department graduation ceremony at 1:30 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center's Fisher Auditorium The $450 award recognizes high academic achievement and good moral character among those pursuing a career in criminology, according to IUP. The scholarship fund was established by KPMG, an international audit, tax, and advisory firm, with the assistance of KPMG employee Julie Duvall, a school friend of Mayhle, and Mayhle's widow.

—"IUP to present first Mayhle scholarship,"
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 12, 2012

 

Clyde McGeary, a Camp Hill resident who helped to create the Governor’s School for the Arts and the Governor’s Schools of Excellence during his tenure with the Pennsylvania Department of Education, will provide the keynote address Saturday during commencement exercises at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Indiana University of PennsylvaniaClyde McGeary, a Camp Hill resident who pioneered a variety of arts education programs during his tenure with the Pennsylvania Department of Education, will receive an honorary doctorate from Indiana University of Pennsylvania on Saturday, when he also will deliver the keynote address during commencement exercises. McGeary, who served as chief of the education department’s Division of Arts and Sciences from 1975-91, also will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree during his visit to the university.

—"Arts education innovator to speak at IUP commencement,"
Harrisburg Patriot-News, May 11, 2012

 

Director Robert S. Mueller has appointed John G. Perren as the assistant director of the Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate. Mr. Perren most recently served as the deputy assistant director of the Criminal Investigative Division. Before joining the FBI, Mr. Perren was a member of the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, D.C. for 14 years. He worked violent crimes cases, including undercover assignments, and was later promoted to detective. Mr. Perren has a bachelor’s degree in criminology from American University and a master’s degree in criminology with a leadership emphasis in weapons of mass destruction from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—"John G. Perren Named Assistant Director of Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorat,"
City Press (Cypress, Texas), May 11, 2012

 

Paul Grieggs, technical services manager at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP), is also a fan of private clouds. He says they offer the university many of the efficiency, cost, ease of management and disaster recovery benefits offered by public clouds, while also providing continued control over data and the ability to maintain high service levels. The university has already moved its Moodle learning management system, a portion of its student management system, course-specific applications, and student and staff e-mail to a private cloud.

—"Colleges Take Many Paths to the Cloud,"
EdTech, May 11, 2012

 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania honored late Punxsutawney businessman and former IUP trustee Ralph F. Roberts with the establishment of a special-use learning area named for him at IUP’s Punxsutawney campus. May 10, the IUP Council of Trustees approved the establishment of the Ralph F. Roberts Heritage Learning Commons. “The Roberts family, and especially Ralph Roberts, have been longtime supporters of IUP,” David Osikowicz, IUP Council of Trustees chairman, said.

—"Special-use learning area named in honor of Ralph F. Roberts,"
Punxsutawney Spirit, May 11, 2012

 

The 2012 Creston High School awards day was held May 4. The following students received honors and were recognized. Kirsten Sawtelle: Indiana University of Pennsylvania tuition award.

—"Creston High School holds annual awards day,"
Creston News Advertiser (Iowa), May 11, 2012 

 

Last year, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the largest of the State System's 14 universities, opened the Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex. IUP's enrollment of 15,132 is 60 percent greater than CalU's 9,483 students, but CalU's arena is bigger. It has 5,000 fixed seats and holds 6,000 if floor space is used. IUP's center has 4,000 fixed seats and holds 5,000 using floor seats. Although smaller, the Kovalchick houses IUP commencements. Graduation is being split into morning and afternoon ceremonies to allow more guests to attend. After several "soft opening" events, the Kovalchick chose as its debut performance the Harlem Gobetrotters, who sold out the arena on March 10, 2011, IUP spokeswoman Michelle Fryling said. A later concert by Kenny Rogers, held in June while much of the university population was away for the summer, drew about 2,200, she said.

—“Size of California University of Pennsylvania arena raises questions,” 
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 11, 2012

 

Several area students were among nearly 200 who participated April 3 in the seventh annual Undergraduate Scholars Forum at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The event showcases original undergraduate research, art work or performing arts compositions. Students must apply to be part of the forum and are judged by faculty and administrators on content and the quality of their presentations. Local participants included:

Vincent Hall, Greencastle, son of Jim and Kathy Hall and a 2010 graduate of Greencastle-Antrim High School. He won first place in the business case competition for “Netflix's Business Model and Strategy in Renting Movies and TV Episodes.”

Ashley Frankenfield, Greencastle, daughter of Donald and Sheila Frankenfield, a 2010 graduate of GAHS. She presented “Redbox's Strategy in the Movie Rental Industry.”

Mitchell Stadler, Chambersburg, son of Daniel and Michelle Stadler, a 2008 graduate of Chambersburg Area Senior High School. He presented “Oxidation of Alcohols to Esters Using N-bromosuccinimide in Aqueous Media.”

—“3 from Franklin County in IUP's scholars forum,”
Chambersburg Public Opinion, May 10, 2012

 

Myrissa Peck of McConnellsburg, a member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, helped to raise more than $3,000 for Autism Speaks, the largest autism awareness organization in the nation. Peck is a nuclear medicine major at IUP.  

—“Local Woman Part of IUP Sorority Event,” 
Fulton County News, May 5, 2012

 

One would have to go back to Pennsylvania Gov. John Fisher, who ruled the state from 1927 to 1931 on behalf of the coal and steel barons, to find a state leader as anti-union as Gov. Tom Corbett. His efforts to starve and privatize public education and collapse public transportation while shielding gas interests from reasonable taxation and adequate health, safety and zoning regulation are stunningly bold. Once the teacher and transit unions are broken, can construction unions and state workers be far behind? Charles McCollester is a retired professor of Industrial and Labor Relations at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“ Charles McCollester-Union Busting won't help,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 8, 2012

 

Kathryn L. Cosgrove of Carbondale, Julia E. Farrar and Emily M. Neuhausel of Dalton and Kaytlen M. Powers of Scranton were named Provost Scholars at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Kathryn and Julia are fashion merchandising majors; Emily, early childhood education/special education, and Kaytlen, English education.

—“ Super Students,”
Scranton Times-Tribune, May 8, 2012

 

Members of Alpha Xi Delta sorority at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, helped to raise more than $3,000 for Autism Speaks, the largest autism-awareness organization in the nation.

—“ Lansdale woman part of IUP sorority event raising more than $3,000 for autism speaks,” Lansdale Almanac, May 7, 2012

 

Brian T. Harris of Struthers has been named the conductor of the Canfield Community Concert Band. Harris has a master’s degree of music in instrumental conducting from Youngstown State University (2010) and a bachelor of science in music education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania (2003).

—“ Canfield concert band names new conductor,”
Youngstown (Ohio) Vindicator, May 7, 2012

 

Luray Fladd, of McKean, will graduate magna cum laude from Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a bachelor's degree in sociology on May 12. Fladd will work as an intern with Three Rivers Community Foundation this summer. She plans to attend the University of Pittsburgh in the fall in pursuit of a master's degree in social work. Fladd, a graduate of General McLane High School, is the daughter of W. Arthur and Michelle Fladd of McKean.

—“ College Clan,”
Erie Times-News, May 7, 2012

 

According to a recent paper from the 22nd International Conference on College Teaching and Learning, virtual worlds offer many benefits for language education. The authors — David Parrott and James Lenze from Indiana University of Pennsylvania — argue that the social nature of virtual worlds combined with the elements of game play make virtual worlds the best platform for learning languages on the computer. "Virtual worlds offer variety, less stress for language learners

—“ Virtual worlds offer variety, less stress for language learners,”
Hypergrid Business, May 6, 2012

 

Hannah Vought, Exeter Township, worked with Indiana Borough Council to redesign its chambers as part of an interior design course at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She is a 2009 graduate of Exeter High School. Vought was one of 36 students who worked in teams to create a comprehensive design plan.

—“ Campus Notes,” Reading Eagle, May 6, 2012

 

The International Writing Centers Association (IWCA) has bestowed a great honor upon UT Permian Basin faculty member Rebecca Babcock. Her article "Interpreted Writing Center Tutorials with College-Level Deaf Students," which was published in Linguistics and Education last year, has received ICWA’s Best Article Award for 2011. She received the award at an IWCA conference in March in St. Louis. Babcock received her bachelor’s degree in English literature and her master’s degree in bilingual education from the University of Massachusetts-Boston. She earned her doctoral degree is in English from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“ Writing center article earns Babcock best article award,” Odessa American, May 6, 2012

 

This year, the Jewish Community Center has chosen to honor a couple who, while not natives of the area, have made major contributions in the secular and religious arenas since their arrival in the early 1990s. The JCC will recognize Linda and David Salomons as the Jewish Community Yearbook honorees for 2012. A Philadelphia native, Linda earned a bachelor’s degree in English from East Stroudsburg University and a master’s in student affairs in higher education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“ Salomons’ Named 2012 Jewish Community Honorees,” NBC-TV Binghamton, N.Y., May 7, 2012

 

Special features will abound during the Chautauqua Regional Youth Symphony's Spring Gala Concert celebrating the completion of its 25th season. Elizabeth Rusch Fetters is joining the symphony for her violinist sister Mary Worley's final concert. A graduate of Warren Area High School with music degrees from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Kent State University, Ms. Fetters teaches middle school music for Harford County (Maryland) Public Schools. Among her musical accomplishments are being a founding member of the Upper Chesapeake Wind Ensemble and having numerous articles published on bassoon pedagogy.

—“ CRYS Concert to Conclude 25th Season,” Jamestown (NY) Post-Journal, May 4, 2012

 

Now, as a home health care nurse for the Visiting Nurse Association of Erie County, Carrie L. Piccinini, R.N., has made home health care nursing her livelihood. "As a home health care nurse, I am able to create a special type of bond that cannot be created in the typical nursing environment. We go into a patient's home at a vulnerable point of their life; not only to help them get better, but oftentimes to show them how to live easier," Piccinini said. Graduating from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Piccinini has been a home health care nurse for over 20 years.

—“ Home health care becomes rewarding career,” Erie-Times News, May 4, 2012

 

For the amount of cheering in the Pittsburgh Brashear High School gym on Tuesday, you’d have thought graduation had come a few weeks early. The Career and College Declaration Ceremony was a chance for graduating seniors to publically announce their future plans to peers, family and the rest of the Brashear community. Students held signs for Duquesne University, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro University, Waynesburg University, The Art Institute, Slippery Rock University, the University of Pittsburgh, the United States Army and Marine Corps, West Penn Nursing and several more.

—“ A Declaration of Success,” Dormont-Brookline Patch.com, May 3, 2012

 

Want to start your own business? Are you looking for a way to receive an education designed for entrepreneurs, not just general business graduates? Fortunately, a number of online master degree programs and other resources that are designed with this aim in mind. Small business owners tend to be a practical bunch, and educational institutions have been quick to create programs that meet their needs. Quick Programs: Schools such as the Indiana University of Pennsylvania offer seminars designed especially for small business owners who want to learn about a new trend or strategic style with which they lack experience or knowledge. These classes can be a godsend to entrepreneurs who plan on starting their own companies but are anxious about financing or legal issues.

—“ Traditional and Online Master Degree Programs for Aspiring Small Business Owners,”
Z6 Mag, May 2, 2012

 

It was all part of the West Shamokin Safe Driving Awareness Day for grades 10 through 12. The event was held on the school grounds throughout the day on Wednesday. Bevi Powell, of Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Highway Safety Center, coordinated a simulation station which allowed students to use their phones to text while attempting to play a Mario Kart Wii game. She also provided impairment goggles to students who were attempting to throw a ball or ride a scooter board. "It shows them how their coordination and depth perception is skewed when they're impaired," said Powell.

—“ West Shamokin students learn dangers of distracted driving,”
Kittanning Leader-Times, May 2, 2012

 

Bess Daniel has been baking for her bread for seven years, but her relationship with sweets goes back a long way. After high school, Daniel made her way to the Academy of Culinary Arts at Indiana University of Pennsylvania to hone her skills. Upon graduation, she came to central Ohio to intern for Master Chef Harmut Handke of Handke’s Cuisine, then briefly worked for a bakery before taking a job decorating cakes at a retail store seven years ago. After leaving her job there, she began receiving countless requests from friends, family members and previous customers for her edible designs.

—“ Home-based baker creates sweet treats and elaborate designs,”
Columbus (Ohio) City Scene Magazine, May 1, 2012

 

Here's a look at this season's college commencements for undergraduates: Indiana University of Pennsylvania, morning and afternoon ceremonies in the Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex. Colleges of Natural Sciences and Math; Fine Arts; and Health and Human Services at 9 a.m. Colleges of Education; Humanities and Social Sciences; and Business at 1:30 p.m. Honorary degree recipient and speaker for both ceremonies: Clyde Mills McGeary, Class of 1954 and an artist and art educator credited with creating the Arts in Education Movement.

—“ 2012 college commencement ceremonies schedule,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 29, 2012

 

Courtney Challingsworth of Penfield worked with Indiana Borough Council to redesign its chambers as part of an interior design course at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The daughter of William and Lori Challingsworth, she is a graduate of DuBois Area High School. She was one of 36 students who worked in teams to create a comprehensive design plan. Each team was required to meet with Jeff Raykes, Indiana Borough manager, to discuss the functional needs of the council chambers.

—“ Student assists with council chambers redesign,”
Clearfield Progress, April 28, 2012

 

An Indiana University of Pennsylvania sociologist's study of mixed martial arts competitors found that these men have unique ways of managing fear that actually allow them to exhibit confidence. This ability, which Dr. Christian A. Vaccaro and colleagues call "managing emotional manhood," is both an interactional strategy for managing emotion and a means for conveying a social identity to others. The study finds that successful management of fear by men in contact sports such as mixed martial arts may "create an emotional orientation that primes men to subordinate and harm others."

—“ Vaccaro's co-authored article, "Managing Emotional Manhood: Fighting and Fostering Fear in Mixed Martial Arts" appears in the December 2011 issue of the American Sociological Association's Social Psychology Quarterly,”
Bio-Medicine, April 2012

 

Name: Mike (Abu) Abusharia. Age: 22, Occupation: Abu is employed at Cardinal Systems as an Environmental Health and Safety Coordinator. He recently graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Arts degree in safety science. Fire Company: He has been with the Alburtis Fire Department for six years.

—“ Alburtis Firefighter Mike (Abu) Abusharia is Inspired,”
Lower Macungie (Pa.) Patch.com, April 26, 2012

 

Brad August, a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, works in the Veterans' Student Liaison Office. After joining the Air Force in 1999 at 22, he served in Germany, Bosnia, Kurdistan and Iraq. Now 34, he is studying safety sciences and gives veterans financial aid advice and helps out at the Veterans Affairs Office. "What you get out of other veterans is a certain level of comfort," August said. "You form a kinship with other members of the military."

—“ Student vets aided by GI Bill during challenging transition,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 25, 2012

 

"I'm not convinced it's happening more, I think it's reported more," says Michele Papakie, an associate journalism professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a lieutenant colonel in the Air National Guard. Papakie embedded with an Army unit in Afghanistan and served as its SAPRO coordinator.

—“ Military struggles with rise in sexual-assault complaints,”
PIttsburgh City Paper, April 18, 2012

 

The researchers, Joshua Castle of Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Les Myers of the University of New Mexico, surveyed 121 football academic advisers to gauge how the rule would affect their advice to athletes and how the athletes might be harmed. (The researchers sent surveys directly to advisers across the country, so the sample spans different types of institutions and all Division I athletic conferences.)

—“ Football advisers predict negative athlete outcomes under 9-credit rule,”
Inside Higher Ed, April 20, 2012

 

Brian Caleb Dumm, a local professional artist who is an art teacher at Central Cambria Middle School, has donated three original works from his collection to be raffled off at this year’s show to help raise funds. Dumm, whose artistic styles range from fine to commercial, has studied visual arts at Columbus College of Art and Design, Pennsylvania State University and Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He is a professional illustrator who is an active member of the Allied Artists of Johnstown and the Pittsburgh Society of Illustrators.

—“ Courthouse to be awash in art during annual show,”
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, April 23, 2012

 

Gary Nesteruk, Santa Monica, Calif., will be the featured performer at the 23rd annual spring jazz concert at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Morgan Auditorium at Penn State Schuylkill. A native of Brackenridge, near Pittsburgh, Nesteruk earned his bachelor's degree in music education and master's degree in music performance from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“ Film pianist to perform at Penn State Schuylkill,”
Republican-Herald, April 22, 2012

 

Ryan Ginter, 18, will be in a laboratory on Monday trying to out-perform 1,000 of the nation's top chemistry students in topics that include bonding and molecular structure, stoichiometry and solutions and also kinetics. Theoretical physics figures largely into his future plans. This fall he will attend Indiana University of Pennsylvania and major in physics.

—“ Shansksville senior leading the pack in chemistry competition,”
Somerset Daily-American, April 21, 2012

 

Volunteers and landscapers are starting the process to make the Flight 93 National Memorial in Somerset County greener by planting 15,000 seedlings at the site. About 150 volunteers from organizations like Penn State University-Altoona and Indiana University of Pennsylvania are planting 20 different kinds of trees, working on 40 acres at a time.

—“ IUP helps make a difference,”
WJAC-TV (Johnstown-Altoona), NBC affiliate, April 21, 2012

 

More than 40 years ago, at the height of the Vietnam War, James K. Flannery of Pittsburgh and Robert Young of Saltsburg were students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Both shipped out to Vietnam, serving together in the 2nd Battalion, 34th Armor Regiment. Both gave their lives for their country. At 1 p.m. Saturday, fellow alumni will celebrate their lives in a ceremony in the campus' Pierce Hall, where new portraits of the men and a bench created in their honor will be dedicated. Pierce Hall houses the university's Department of Military Science and the ROTC program.

—“ IUP alumni, Vietnam vets to be honored,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, April 20, 2012

 

Artist Clyde Mills McGeary, a 1954 graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania and an innovator of arts in education, will receive an honorary doctorate and serve as the keynote speaker for IUP's May 12 commencement ceremonies. This year, IUP will hold two ceremonies, both in the Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex, combining undergraduate and graduate students.

—“ Two ceremonies set for IUP commencement,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, April 16, 2012

 

The fine-dining revolution at Lenape Heights Grille Room began when KPM Herkules acquired the Lenape Heights Golf Course property in 2007, and made renovations during the next few years, but it went into full swing when executive chef Jonathan Nagy arrived in 2010. "This is really a treat for me, to be an international-style chef with this restaurant in my backyard so that I can stay at home and make this amazing food," says Nagy, 28, a Rural Valley native who graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Academy of Culinary Arts and worked in Boca Raton, Fla., at Eleven in the Strip District and, most recently, at The Coventry Inn in Indiana. "I want to scream to all my friends, 'Please come to Lenape Heights and get a food-and-dining experience that you will not find outside the city.

—“ Heights Grille Room putting more emphasis on the upscale experience,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, April 29, 2012

 

This week’s Q&A profiles Washington Mill Elementary School principal Dr. Lizette “Tish” Howard. Originally from western Pennsylvania, Howard earned her bachelor's and master’s degrees in speech and language pathology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and received her PhD in education leadership and counseling from George Mason University.

—“ WMES Principal: 'Every Child Has Potential,”
Patch.com, April 16, 2012

 

Officially, Edinboro native Courtney Buchna is in her seventh season as a SeaWolves employee. The 2011 graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania is in her first season as Erie's entertainment director, Unofficially, though, Buchna has called Uht Park a summer home almost her entire life. "I remember asking C. Wolf to sign (an autograph) as a small child," she said. "I started as a diamond girl here at 16, and worked here throughout high school, college and now as a young professional. I couldn't have asked for a better job right out of college." Buchna is the kind of person who likely would have been a member of the SeaWolves' new student ambassador program had it existed before this season. The program will allow high school sophomores, juniors and seniors to shadow team employees and get a grasp on what it's like to run a minor league sports franchise. Brianne Lenhart is one of the students accepted into the program. The Saegertown High School senior hopes to follow Buchna's path when she attends IUP this fall.

—“ Noticeable changes to greet fans at Erie SeaWolves' first home,”
Erie Times News, April 12, 2012

 

A seminar that had been in the works for more than a year aimed to educate people on how to make schools and places of work less prone to violence. Nearly 700 police officers, emergency responders and educators gathered at Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex learn from recent tragedies at Chardon High School, Western Psych and others.

—“ Seminar Aims to Make Schools, Workplaces Safer,”
KDKA-TV (Pittsburgh, Pa.), April 11, 2012

 

Bottle Works and Art Works are teaming up for an exhibition and workshop package that highlights artwork depicting Johnstown and Cambria County. “Scenes of Johnstown and Cambria County” is scheduled to open from 4 to 8 p.m. April 14. The exhibit features landscapes by Western Pennsylvania natives Ron Donoughe and Scott Steberger. The Pittsburgh resident’s art was selected for Salon International’s Masters of Contemporary Fine Art in 2004 and awarded best of show at the Three Rivers Arts Festival in 2003. One of his previous city-based exhibits focused on Indiana and the full collection still hangs at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, which is Donoughe’s alma mater. He teaches plein air workshops throughout the United States and is a member of the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. In addition to IUP, Donoughe’s paintings can be found at The Westmoreland Museum of American Fine Art and The Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art.

—“ Art exhibit brings region's landscapes and history to life,”
Somerset Daily-American, April 9, 2012

Mansfield University students are organizing a "We are Trayvon" Hooded March for 5 p.m. Thursday in memory of the Florida teenager who was shot and killed Feb. 26 in an incident that has drawn national attention. The march will be similar to others that have taken place across the country, including other Pennsylvania state college campuses at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Bloomsburg University.

—“ Mansfield University students plan Trayvon Martin march,”
Elmira (NY) Star Gazette, April 9, 2012

The Indiana University of Pennsylvania softball team will be having a "Cancer Awareness Day" on Friday in memory of Heather Miller, an 11-year-old student at Chestnut Ridge Middle School who passed away from cancer in 2010. The event was planned by Claysburg-Kimmel graduate Monica Iachini, a member of the Crimson Hawks, and assistant coach Julia Popovich.

—“ IUP softball sets event to help cancer patients,”
Altoona Mirror, April 9, 2012

The investigation into weeks of bomb threats at the University of Pittsburgh ratcheted up on Friday when U.S. Attorney David Hickton said the region's Joint Terrorism Task Force has joined in the effort to catch the culprits. Dennis Giever, professor of criminology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, said a union of agencies should help. "You have better minds, greater minds from each law enforcement agency, asking, 'What are we missing? What should we be looking at?' " Giever said.

—“ Pitt getting assistance from region's Joint Terrorism Task Force,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, April 7, 2012

Students from nine counties trekked to Indiana University of Pennsylvania for an opportunity to show off their knowledge of history. The university hosted the National History Day regional competition for students in middle and high school. Elizabeth Ricketts, IUP history department assistant professor and event committeewoman, said 236 students competed from 15 schools representing Cambria, Indiana, Blair, Clearfield, Armstrong, Centre, Jefferson, Huntingdon and Elk counties.

—“IUP event nurtures new attitudes about history,”
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, April 6, 2012

Rhode Island native Chris Voccio has been named publisher of The Bulletin, effective April 23. GateHouse Media Inc., the paper’s New York-based parent company, made the announcement Thursday. Voccio will take over for Paul Provost, who has been hired to be regional vice president for Digital First Media’s Eastern Region. Voccio, who is single, is an airplane pilot and avid motorcyclist. Among his credentials is a Master of Business Administration from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“R.I. native named new Bulletin publisher,”
Norwich, CT - The Bulletin, April 5, 2012

A new dean will be coming to the College of Liberal Arts (CLA) at California State University, Long Beach starting July 1, officials announced Tuesday. David L. Wallace was appointed by CSULB officials to replace retiring CLA dean Gerald Riposa. Wallace serves as chair of the Department of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Central Florida (UCF). He has published research about the teaching of first-year composition for 25 years, including three books and more than 25 articles and book chapters. He has been an award-winning teacher at both Iowa State University and UCF, where he also won an award for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Wallace was raised in the coal mining hills of western Pennsylvania, and received an M.A. in rhetoric and linguistics from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in rhetoric from Carnegie Mellon University.

—“CSULB Officials Appoint New Dean Of the College Of Liberal Arts,”
Long Beach (CA) Gazette, April 4, 2012

This type of behavior is typical of (Francine) Endler, who is this year's recipient of the WISE Women of Blair County award for Education. Endler has been working in public education for the past 14 years, and before that with kids in foster care. Endler received a bachelor's degree in sociology from the University of Pittsburgh, a master's degree in counseling services from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and two post-master's certificates. Aside from serving as principal for Allegheny No. 1, she is also the guidance department chairperson for the school district.

—“Francine Endler: Education -- Endler shines as an example, makes learning a life-long effort,”
Altoona Mirror, April 3, 2012

When Carol Oliver was asked to help with Concordia Lutheran Ministries' annual Easter and Christmas cantatas a couple of years ago, it was music to her ears. "It's a wonderful outlet for me," said Oliver, 83. "It has worked out really well." That's no surprise, considering her background. Oliver has directed choirs in churches from Ford City to Europe. Wanting to ensure she had the necessary knowledge, she supplemented her directing with lessons from private teachers and through Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Choir director enjoys encore,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, April 2, 2012

In a ceremony on Saturday, Towanda High School graduate Leslie A. Purser officially became one of fewer than 10 female major generals in the U.S. Army Reserve. Purser, who has served in the military for 31 years, graduated from Towanda High School in 1975, then from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1980. In 2004, she earned a master's degree in strategic studies from the Army War College, Carlisle, Pa. She is also a graduate of the Military Intelligence Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff School.

—“Campus notes,”
The Daily Review (Towanda, Pa.), April 1, 2012

Chelsea Murray, Robeson Township, presented at the annual English Undergraduate Conference at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. A graduate of Twin Valley High School, Murray was one of 74 student panelists at the conference. She is a sophomore in the Robert E. Cook Honors College at IUP.

—“Campus notes,”
Reading Eagle, April 1, 2012

“Uniforms, Outfits and Accessories” was created by professional and fine-arts photographer Joel DeGrand of Beverly Shores.DeGrand, 67, a native of Pennsylvania, is married to Amanda Freymann; they have raised two adult children. Since 1990, he has been an adjunct professor at Columbia College in Chicago. DeGrand also teaches at Moraine Valley Community College in Palos Hills, Ill. College? “Indiana University of Pennsylvania, which is a teachers’ college and an art school; I wanted to be an art teacher.”

—“Jeff Manes: DeGrand tells stories with photos,”
Chicago Sun-Tribune, March 30, 2012

Cassidy Pittman, of Mc- Connellsburg, presented at the annual English Undergraduate Conference at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in February. She is the daughter of Tammy and James Barnes and Jeff and Lisa Pittman and a graduate of Mc- Connellsburg High School.

—“Pittman Presents at Undergraduate Conference at IUP,”
The Fulton County News, March 28, 2012

Leslie A. Purser, daughter of Marilyn R. Miller of York Avenue, Towanda, is slated to receive a second star after serving 31 years in uniform. She currently serves in the Pentagon, as Director of Intelligence, Plans and Policy, for the Department of the Army. Purser is a 1975 Towanda High School graduate and a 1980 graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania. In 2004, she earned a master's degree in strategic studies from the Army War College, Carlisle, Pa. She is also a graduate of the Military Intelligence Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff School

—“Towanda native to be promoted to major general in the U.S. Army Reserve,”
Towanda (NY) Daily Review, March 29, 2012

As part of the convention, one Waynesboro student or graduate was given the opportunity to join the Windjammers at the concert. Zachary Grass, 19, the son of Calvin and Deborah Grass of Waynesboro, who plays the tuba, will be accompanying the Windjammers. Grass is a 2010 Waynesboro Area Senior High School graduate and now attends Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Windjammers circus music coming to Waynesboro,”
Waynesboro Record Herald, March 27, 2012

Rough it. Many colleges charge less for living quarters that your child has to share with more students, or for dorms that are farther away from the heart of campus or lack amenities such as air conditioning. A quadruple room at Carnegie Mellon, for example, costs $5,780 this year, $1,400 less than a double; at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, you'll pay $5,000 for a double with a private bathroom, vs. $3,900 for a double without one.

—“How to cut college housing costs,”
CNN Money, March 27, 2012

He’s so versatile that he can write plays or act in them. This time around, multi-award winner Bruce Graham, a Philadelphia native who lived in Media for many years, is watching the second production and East Coast premiere of his newest play “The Outgoing Tide,” presented by the Philadelphia Theatre Company and running March 23 to April 22 at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre.A graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania — “not one of the better known theater schools in the world,” he laughs — Graham originally trained as an actor. “I’ve been an actor, a standup comic, a writer. I always knew one way or the other I wanted to be in the entertainment business.”

—“Bruce Graham hopes with ongoing success with ‘Outgoing Tide’,”
Bucks County Local News, March 21, 2012

Pennsylvanians generally don't think of themselves as being Appalachian, but the historian who wrote the book on the region would tell you that kind of thinking is itself Appalachian. The A-word is "essentially a term imposed from the outside," historian John A. Williams said Friday to open the 35th annual Appalachian Studies Conference. Most people don't have the time to think like professors. Go anywhere up and down this mountain range and you'll find a hyper-local sense of place. Appalachian people "think of themselves as being from Grassy Creek or 'the other side of the valley,' " Mr. Williams, author of "Appalachia: A History," said. Nevertheless, about 700 academics assembled at Indiana University of Pennsylvania this weekend for the first Appalachian Studies Conference north of the Mason-Dixon Line. Mr. Williams, 73, drove northwest from his home in Washington, D.C., and I drove northeast from the heart of the largest metropolis in the region that dares not speak its name.

—“My fellow Appalachians: Our region rocks,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 25, 2012

“In many other states, batterers programs are mandated for varying lengths at least for the first offense,” said Ed Gondolf, retired research director for the Mid-Atlantic Addiction Research and Training Institute and sociology professor emeritus at Indiana University of Pennsylvania “Putting people in jail, in and of itself, is not a cure-all. It sounds like it’s a simplistic answer to a harder problem and one that appeals to the public — the law and order toughness — but isn’t necessarily practical in the long run.”

—“Jail alone won't cure batterers, critics say,”
The Tennessean, March 21, 2012

Auditor General Jack Wagner said some charter and cyber-charter schools replacing public schools are being run for profit and the state legislature should end this practice. He defended schools in Pennsylvania in general as being among the best in the country. He criticized cuts in state funding for education, and he took particular note of spending for state-related and state universities. He noted he was a graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and he said colleges such as IUP are important in the state “to provide cost-efficient college education to our common folk. I’m very concerned. They need the state system.”

—“Auditor general criticizes education spending priorities,”
Daily Local News (Chester County), March 20, 2012

Penn State’s new football coach has slowly been making his way around the state. Sunday, he was the featured speaker at the Central Pennsylvania Chapter of The National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame’s annual awards banquet at the Penn Stater Conference Center. The senior college scholar-athletes honored were Bucknell’s Tim Bolte, Clarion’s Shawn Sopic, Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Johnny Franco, Juniata’s Brent Shippey, Lock Haven’s Jarryd Burkett, Lycoming’s Ray Bierbach, St. Francis’ Luke McConnell, Susquehanna’s Matt Knouse and Penn State’s Jon Rohrbaugh.

—“Nittany Lions New Coach Gives Words of Wisdom,”
Centre Daily Times (State College, Pa.), March 26, 2012

More than 170 of the top South Dakota high school musicians are gathering in Brookings on Saturday for All-State Band. The bands will be under the direction of Capt. Brian Walden of the U.S. Navy Band and Jack Stamp, professor of music at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Student musicians flock to Brookings for All-State,”
Appleton Post-Crescent (Wisconsin), March 24, 2012

Almost everyone has enjoyed the abnormally warm weather throughout the winter season. But along with such weather comes an onslaught of deer ticks, or black-legged ticks, throughout the area. Unseasonably warm weather has extended the season of activity for the ticks, said Dr. Tom Simmons, IUP professor of Biology and Public Environmental Health.

—“Ticks a potential danger to humans, animals,”
The Punxsutawney Spirit, March 24, 2012

Student activity fees have been a point of contention on college campuses for years. Lawsuits proceeding as far as the Supreme Court have challenged whether the fees can fund political or religious groups. Records from Pennsylvania's 14 state universities show the fees -- ranging from $235 at Kutztown University to $900 at Mansfield University -- are spent on everything from the Paintball Club and the Paranormal Society to political speakers and fitness and leisure centers. Indiana University of Pennsylvania charged students $551 annually, collecting $6.8 million this year. Almost 30 percent -- about $2 million -- is used to pay the student union lease, according to records.

—“Students balk at activity fees,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 19, 2012

Student activity fees have been a point of contention on college campuses for years. Lawsuits proceeding as far as the Supreme Court have challenged whether the fees can fund political or religious groups. Records from Pennsylvania's 14 state universities show the fees -- ranging from $235 at Kutztown University to $900 at Mansfield University -- are spent on everything from the Paintball Club and the Paranormal Society to political speakers and fitness and leisure centers. Indiana University of Pennsylvania charged students $551 annually, collecting $6.8 million this year. Almost 30 percent -- about $2 million -- is used to pay the student union lease, according to records.

—“Students balk at activity fees,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 19, 2012

Hundreds of colleges are testing freshmen and seniors to measure learning from enrollment to graduation. Few private colleges have revealed their assessment results to the public. But 144 public universities have posted scores on a site called College Portraits under the Voluntary System of Accountability, launched in 2007 by two public university associations. In Pittsburgh's Tri-State region and Pennsylvania as a whole, Indiana University of Pennsylvania and West Virginia and Temple universities have posted scores.

—“More colleges begin testing students to measure learning,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 19, 2012

Angelica Dunsavage, a senior at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and the Robert E. Cook Honors College, was asked to present her original quartet accompanied by a fellow student's original dance at the Undergraduate Scholar Forum. "Marriage Then Love" by Angelica and student Alexandra Hull created the history of women's rights through music and dance. The submission is part of the performing arts category that is being presented during a daylong scholar forum on April 3.

—“College notes,”
Pottsville Republican, March 17, 2012

Hundreds of colleges are testing freshmen and seniors to measure learning from enrollment to graduation. More than 100 schools have voluntarily published results from new learning assessments, offering parents, prospective students and government regulators a gauge of the value colleges add to the acquisition of knowledge and critical thinking skills. Here is a sampling of notable public universities that have posted learning assessment results for their students: Auburn University, Binghamton University, California State University at Long Beach, Clemson University, Florida State University, Frostburg State University, Indiana University of Pennsylvania...

—“More Colleges Are Testing Students to Measure Learning,”
Bangor (ME) Daily News, March 17, 2012

Hundreds of colleges are testing freshmen and seniors to measure learning from enrollment to graduation. More than 100 schools have voluntarily published results from new learning assessments, offering parents, prospective students and government regulators a gauge of the value colleges add to the acquisition of knowledge and critical thinking skills. Here is a sampling of notable public universities that have posted learning assessment results for their students: Auburn University, Binghamton University, California State University at Long Beach, Clemson University, Florida State University, Frostburg State University, Indiana University of Pennsylvania...

—“College accountability: a closer look,”
The Washington Post, March 16, 2012

Debbie L. Sydow has been named Richard Bland College's next president, effective July 1. Sydow, president of Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, N.Y., will succeed James B. McNeer, who is retiring after 16 years as president of the junior college just south of Petersburg. A native of Abingdon, Sydow received her undergraduate degree in English from the University of Virginia's College at Wise. She earned her master's degree from Marquette University and her doctorate from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“New Richard Bland College president named,”
Richmond Times-Dispatch, March 15, 2012

Dr. Debbie L. Sydow, a nationally recognized leader in higher education and the community college sector, will be sworn in as the fourth president of Richard Bland College on July 1. With more than 20 years of experience in higher education, Sydow has served in leadership positions for national and regional industry associations, including the president of the New York Community College Association for Presidents, chair of the board of directors of the Institute for Community College Development at Cornell University, and chair of the American Council on Education's Commission on Leadership and Institutional Effectiveness. Sydow received her undergraduate degree in English from the University of Virginia's College at Wise. She earned her master's degree in English from Marquette University and her Ph.D. in English from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Richard Bland College names new president,”
Petersburg (VA) Progress-Index, March 15, 2012

Nominations for all 203 state House seats -- and half of the state Senate seats -- will be determined in the April 24 primary election. Many incumbents are unopposed, but there are a few races attracting attention -- and candidates. Incumbent Mr. Saccone of Elizabeth Township is being challenged for the Republican nomination by Shauna D'Alessandro of Jefferson Hills. Ms. D'Alessandro, 55, is a self-employed certified public accountant. She is married and graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a degree in accounting. She has been on the Jefferson Hills school board for eight years, three of them as president.

—“Campaign 2012: House, Senate races in April 24 primary heat up,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 15, 2012

Debbie L. Sydow will become the fourth president of Richard Bland College, Virginia’s only junior college. Sydow is president of Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, N.Y. She will become Richard Bland’s president on July 1. Sydow will succeed James B. MCNeer, who will retire after spend more than four decades at the college in Petersburg, including the past 16 years as president. Sydow has been president at Onondaga since 2000. She is a native of Abingdon and received her undergraduate degree in English from University of Virginia’s College at Wise. She has a master’s degree in English from Marquette University and her Ph.D. in English from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“New president appointed at Richard Bland,”
Virginia Business News, March 15, 2012

Numerous acting performances weren’t enough to prepare Anna Oberneder for her latest audience. The 2011 Ford City High School graduate was crowned ‘Miss Armstrong County’ February 25 during the annual pageant Anna, 18, is now a history major at Indiana University of Pennsylvania – Northpointe campus. Sister Kate and fellow IUP Student Kaitlyn Ripley, a Kittanning grad, made T-shirts to cheer on Anna.

—“Miss Armstrong County' Prepares for State Competition,”
The Kittanning Paper, March 12, 2012

Media Psychologist Dr. Robert Heasley, a Professor of Sociology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, says the conference is an important one to attend, “for any of us involved in raising boys. As men ourselves really having the chance to sit and really think about what are the messages we received growing up? What gets in our way in feeling connected to other people? Having the life we want? Those are the issues we are going to be addressing.”

—“Widener Hosts 'Deepening Men's Relationships' Conference This Saturday,”
CBS News, Philadelphia, March 12, 2012

Quarterly analyses of the reservoir water have been conducted by students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania for the past eight months. The authority last year paid the university $55,000 to perform the tests. "This tells us so far there's been no effect on the water, positively or negatively. It's all the same to us," authority manager Chris Kerr said.

—“Gas drilling isn't harming reservoir water, IUP tests show,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 11, 2012

Robert F. Cahalan, a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore, will give a presentation on global warming as part of the 35th annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference hosted by Indiana University of Pennsylvania March 23-25.

—“UN climate change panel member to speak in Indiana, Pa.,”
State Journal (Charleston, WVa.), March 7, 2012

I played sports in high school at Wilson. I also lifted, and that's when I got introduced to the whole exercise science field. I went to the Indiana University of Pennsylvania for exercise science. I have always worked out on my own, mostly running, and I enjoy doing that.

—“Fitness Profile: Melissa Hummel,”
Reading Eagle, March 8, 2012

Only one student wasn't wearing a seat belt when a police officer conducted a checkpoint to explain the new seat-belt law for drivers and passengers younger than 18 as school was dismissed at West Shamokin High School on Friday afternoon. Representatives from the Kiski Township Police Department and the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Highway Safety Center in conjunction with PennDOT were there to inform teen drivers and their parents of the changes in young driver licensing and passenger requirements.

—“Police making sure teen drivers understand the law,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 3, 2012

The owner of a Ligonier investment advising firm has been selected by alma mater Indiana University of Pennsylvania for induction into the Eberly College Business Hall of Distinction.Patrick Wallace, owner of Covington Investment Advisors Inc., will be inducted during an April 5 ceremony at the university. The ceremony will be held during Eberly College's Business Day events in the Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex.

—“IUP to honor investment firm owner,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 1, 2012

Wilho Saari and Carl Rahkonen will present a combination of Finnish music and lecture at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 6, at Valley Bible Church, 4723 State Route 4. The event is free and a reception will follow. Rahkonen, from Pennsylvania, is a second generation Finnish-American who works as a music librarian and professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Kantele program explores Finland-America connections,”
Coast Weekend: Arts (Rosburg, WA), February 29, 2012

The world's most popular website started in a college dorm room, and for some users it stops there, too. Derek Snyder, 20, a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, said he was unhappy with the amount of drinking photos and other posts he deemed innaproppriate. He prefers Twitter: "No pictures, easier to use, nobody talking drama on you or anybody else."

—“Closing the 'book',”
Philadelphia Inquirer, February 29, 2012

The Octagon Gallery at Patterson Library will exhibit paintings by distinguished artist Alberto Rey. Born in Havana, Cuba, in 1960, Rey received his political asylum through Mexico in 1963 and moved to Miami, Fla., in 1965. In 1967, his family relocated to Pennsylvania and in 1982 he received his bachelor's degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“New Exhibition To Open in Westfield,”
The Post-Journal (Jamestown, NY), February 29, 2012

Blalock runs the restaurant with the able assistance of his partner and fellow executive chef Chad Riedley, another youthful veteran of the Cuttalossa Inn who studied hotel and restaurant management at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, whose passion for seafood matches Blalock’s and who also tends to the business end of the enterprise.

—“Pennsylvania Soup & Seafood House: Amazing array of two favorite foods,”
Montgomery News, February 28, 2012

Adrian S. Wisnicki, an assistant professor of 19th-century British literature, studies the works of Victorian-era explorers and novelists, including Livingstone, Richard Burton, and Joseph Conrad, based on their travels to Africa and across the British Empire.

—“Dr. Livingstone's lost diary, I presume?,”
Philadelphia Inquirer, February 27, 2012

A field diary partially written with berry juice on old newsprint, paper scraps and book margins in the last years of the life of British explorer David Livingstone is legible for the first time in 141 years, with the help of modern-day spectral-imaging technology and the old-fashioned sleuthing of an Indiana University of Pennsylvania professor.

—“Finding Dr. Livingstone: Technology and tenacity reveal the Victorian-era explorer's diary, No need to presume,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, February 26, 2012

The Nazareth Community Band plans to open the concert with an arrangement of the national anthem written by Jack Stamp, a professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Brodt said that version was selected because all royalties from the piece benefit victims of 9/11.

—“Hundreds expected to attend patriotic concert at Nazareth Area High School,”
Lehigh Express-Times, February 26, 2012

Three North Hills School District administrators will receive promotions effective July 1 under an organizational restructuring plan that the school board approved during its Monday legislative meeting. Marilyn Cain, director of elementary education, has been promoted to assistant superintendent for elementary education. She will oversee the district’s kindergarten through grade 6 educational program including the supervision of four elementary principals and elementary staff induction and professional development. Cain has served in numerous teaching and administrative capacities throughout her tenure with the district. Cain earned a doctorate in education from the University of Pittsburgh. She completed her master’s degree in education at the University of Illinois and her bachelor’s degree in elementary education at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“North Hills Promotes Three Administrators to Assistant Superintendents,”
NorthHillsPatch.com, February 23, 2012

Fly fishing enthusiast Chuck Furimsky, 69, of Rockwood felt the pull of fate's current and waded right on in. Furimsky is the CEO and director of The Fly Fishing Show, an internationally renowned traveling exhibition of all things fly fishing. The sport, which began as Furimsky's childhood leisure, grew into he and his family's life's work. Furimsky, a graduate of Pennsylvania State University, went on to teach English in the Pittsburgh area before earning his masters degree at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Chuck Furimsky waded into his hobby for a career,”
Somerset Daily American, February 12, 2012

On March 13 Dr. Christine Clewell, assistant professor of organ at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, will play the church's restored Skinner organ. Dr. Clewell has performed in numerous programs in the Midwest and Northeast, including the Washington National Cathedral, Heinz Memorial Chapel, Pittsburgh, and the Kutzschmar Series in Portland, Maine. As a recipient of the Rackham Minority Fellowship, she earned her doctoral degree from the University of Michigan in sacred and liturgical studies. She also holds degrees from IUP and Susquehanna University. She has had extensive experience as a church organist-choirmaster. At IUP she is the music department's keyboard area coordinator and a member of the Carol Teti Memorial Organ Scholarship Committee.

—“Noon recitals tuned to Spring,”
Somerset Daily-American, February 12, 2012

Many smiles and approvals filled the New Martinsville City Council chambers Monday night as the body voted unanimously to hire Josh Williams as the city's newest patrolman. New Martinsville Police Chief Tim Cecil was proud to say Williams was a "hometown boy" who is a graduate of Magnolia High School. He also has a bachelor's degree in criminal justice from West Liberty University and a master's degree in criminal justice from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“NMPD Hires Williams,”
Wetzel (West Virginia) Chronicle (Indiana), February 8, 2012

While Beverly Shores photographer Joel DeGrand's South Shore Arts exhibit is titled "Uniforms," the surroundings in his creations are as vital as the wardrobes. Celebrating the opening of "Uniforms" at the gallery at The Center for Visual and Performing Arts in Munster at 1 p.m. Feb.12, DeGrand received a bachelor's degree in art from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a master's degree from the University of Oregon.

—“Working world documented in 'Uniforms',”
NWI.Com (Indiana), February 8, 2012

The idea of doing this campaign at Point Park came from Campus Life's assistant community director Deana Kalcich. Kalcich is an Indiana University of Pennsylvania graduate student. It was at IUP last year where a classmate first introduced her to the idea. "He opened up this project to other universities ... [but I] brought it to Point Park. I organize it and recruit student volunteers to be a part of it," Kalcich said on Thursday night in the Campus Life office.

—“Campaign to support Only Love movement,”
Point Park Globe, February 7, 2012

The U.S. Department of Justice has announced the National Drug Intelligence Center in Johnstown, championed by the late U.S. Rep. John Murtha, will close this summer. Dr. Dennis Giever, a criminology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania who has collaborated on NDIC projects, said its work was impressive, but the center owed its survival to Murtha. "It (the closing) leaves a hole, but it's a hole that is easily filled," he said. "His power was the reason it stood up. Once he passed, most of us realized that Murtha projects would slowly disappear."

—“Johnstown drug intelligence center to close in summer,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, February 4, 2012

Public and private partnerships are becoming more common on campuses across the country, and companies such as EdR can shape deals in many ways. At Indiana University of Pennsylvania, EdR helped the school replace all of its aging housing, about 3,500 beds, said Tom Borellis, who oversaw the project for the university. The entire project started in 2005, happened in less than five years and came in about $20 million cheaper than projected.

—“University of Kentucky's plan to privatize housing raises some questions,”
Kentucky Herald-Leader, February 5, 2012

Twelve chili and 10 wing recipes vied for "best in show" in the competition at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Academy of Culinary Arts, an honor that would win a plaque and a certain amount of clout in Punxsutawney. The evening's biggest winner will be the Hog Heaven Rescue Farm in Cochranton.

—“Groundhog Day cook-off benefits Crawford County animal rescue,”
Erie Times-News, February 2, 2012

The Signature Events Committee at Marshall University has partnered with the Student Activities Programming Board to bring speaker Brian C. Johnson to campus. Johnson serves as a faculty member in the department of developmental instruction at Bloomsburg University and is the director of the Frederick Douglass Institute for Academic Excellence. He is currently a doctoral student in Communications Media and Instructional Technology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Johnson's keynote, "Reel Diversity," framed the diversity conversation through modern film.

—“Diversity gets 'reel',”
Parthenon, Marshall University, February 2, 2012

The College of Southern Maryland theater department led by Technical Director Keith Hight competed in the 34th Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Jan. 11-15.

—“CSM Thespians Attend Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival,”
Southern Maryland Online, February 1, 2012

You won’t find a website or Yelp post for Esther’s, a kerosene lamplight spot about two miles outside Punxy. But you likely will find such regional staples as chicken and dumplings, schnitzel, pork with sauerkraut or Amish chicken soup. Shoofly pies will undoubtedly be on the dessert menu, as well as groundhog cookies. The gingerbread treats are shaped like a groundhog. The official recipe was created by Elaine Light, the noted author of a series of Groundhog Day cookbooks and recipes, including one eyebrow-raiser for cooked groundhog. Martha Rupert, a chef instructor at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Academy of Culinary Arts in Punxsutawney, will be eating at home in Punxsutawney with a “house full of company” and her husband Randy Rupert, a chain saw artist known for his “Hog in the Log” carvings of Phil.

—“Shadow Dancing,”
Chicago Sun-Times/Clarendon Hills, February 1, 2012

Along with Pittsburgh's largest universities, several smaller campuses in the region saw gains well above the 18.1 percent increase reported across the survey. For instance, Robert Morris University saw its endowment value grow by 37 percent to $26.2 million; Washington & Jefferson College's endowment value grew by 26.9 percent to nearly $104 million; Chatham University saw its endowment grow by 24.5 percent to $72.9 million; and Indiana University of Pennsylvania and its foundation saw an increase of 20.6 percent to $63.2 million.

—“College endowments rebound from recession,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, January 31, 2012

A two-year ethnographic study of mixed martial arts fighters by a sociologist at Indiana University of Pennsylvania attempted to shed light on the complex male psyche to understand how men manage their fears. The study, led by assistant visiting professor Christian Vaccaro, suggests most fighters never fully overcome their fear of losing or getting injured.

—“Study of martial arts fighters attempts to shed light on how men manage their fears,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, January 30, 2012

UTPB English Professor Rebecca Babcock and Chen met while studying for their doctorates at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and have kept in touch since then. After Chen received a grant from the Taiwanese government to teach Chinese in America, she said she wanted to come to Texas and visit Babcock, who helped coordinate the classes and housing. Though this is Chen's fourth year to bring students to America, it's only her second to be in the Permian Basin. She previously taught in California.

—“Taiwanese students teach Mandarin class at UTPB,”
My West Texas, January 30, 2012

For Trevor Wingard being named the new superintendent of SCI-Laurel Highlands is a dream come true. The Conemaugh Township native finished his fourth official day Monday in his new post, which has a lot of familiar faces. “It’s like being home again,” he said, later adding, “My personal goal was to come back to Somerset County.” The 42-year-old was born and raised in Davidsville and graduated from Conemaugh Township Area High School in 1987. After high school he spent three years on active duty and two years in the National Guard for the United States Air Force. He attended Indiana University of Pennsylvania and received a degree in criminology. Immediately after graduating from college in 1994 he began work at SCI-Somerset as a corrections officer. Wingard always had an interest in corrections since Somerset has two state prisons.

—“SCI-Laurel Highlands welcomes new superintendent,”
Somerset Daily American, January 30, 2012

Done is the first police officer in Susquehanna Twp. — and a rarity among police departments everywhere — to pursue a doctorate. Done served as a military police officer in Kosovo and Iraq, and she joined the Susquehanna Twp. Police Department in 2004. She has a master’s degree in administration with a criminal justice focus from Penn State Harrisburg and hopes to complete her Ph.D. in administration and leadership studies from Indiana University of Pennsylvania by 2016.

—“Susquehanna Township police officer pursues rare doctorate degree,”
Harrisburg Patriot-News, January 28, 2012

Longtime North Huntingdon police Chief Michael Daugherty is "retiring to retire." Chief Daugherty, who has a bachelor's degree in criminology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, recalled that the biggest challenge of his career was to hold together and smoothly run a department that grew to 29 police officers and six dispatchers.

—“North Huntingdon police chief is retiring,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, January 26, 2012

In his first novel, Dennis Marsili hopes to entertain readers with a dramatic police tale and leave them with a new appreciation for law-enforcement officers and the challenges they face. The Kiski Area High School and Indiana University of Pennsylvania graduate retired last August after 29 years as a police officer, the last 26 as a member of New Kensington's department.

—“New Kensington author telling it like it is,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 26, 2012

Recently a former Hazleton woman was selected to be a senior associate of Yale University. Customers of the Third Base, the former Gaylords at the Church Hill Mall or John's Bar on the Heights may recall Deb Roman Swink. Like so many other former area residents, she loves the Coal Region. "I truly believe you leave home, but home never leaves you. I left Hazleton to go to Indiana University of Pennsylvania to become an educator. After that it was all about opportunity and relationships. But Hazleton still draws me like a magnet."

—“Ain't no column big enough,”
Hazelton Standard Speaker, January 25, 2012

Welcome Home." These two words inspired 10 SBU students and faculty members to create a theatrical performance that would honor soldiers and their families in the United States. Theater students, along with Rebecca Misenheimer, assistant professor of visual and performing arts, participated in the Devised Theater Project that took place during the 44th annual regional Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF) Jan. 10-14 at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in Indiana, Pa. Misenheimer said the objective was to create a completely new piece of theater that pertained to the two-word prompt, "Welcome Home."

—“Theater students travel to Indiana, Pa. for annual Kennedy Center Festival,”
The Bona Venture, January 20, 2012

INDIANA, Pa. -- Michael Driscoll is leaving his post as provost and executive vice chancellor of the University of Alaska Anchorage for a job at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He starts July 1. The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education announced Driscoll's appointment Thursday. Driscoll will replace interim president David Werner, who has led Indiana since August 2010.

—“UAA vice chancellor Driscoll takes job in Pennsylvania,”
The News Tribune (Alaska), January 20, 2012

Indiana University of Pennsylvania found its new president in the Last Frontier. Michael A. Driscoll, provost and executive vice chancellor of the University of Alaska at Anchorage, was named to the post on Monday. Driscoll, 50, was selected from a pool of 61 candidates, which was narrowed to three last month. He will begin his new duties on July 1.

—“IUP finds leader in Anchorage,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 20, 2012

INDIANA, Pa. -- The Indiana University of Pennsylvania is getting a new president. Michael Driscoll is leaving his post as provost and executive vice chancellor of the University of Alaska Anchorage to come to western Pennsylvania. He starts on July 1. The State System of Higher Education announced Driscoll's appointment Thursday. Driscoll will replace interim president David Werner, who has led Indiana since August 2010. Driscoll holds undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees in electrical engineering from Michigan State University. He later spent 18 years at Portland State University in Oregon. In 2006, Driscoll went to the University of Alaska, where he also serves as chief academic officer.

—“Indiana University is one of 14 state-owned colleges in Pennsylvania and serves more than 15,000 students,”
WPXI-TV, Pittsburgh, January 19, 2012

On Thursday, the board of governors of the State System of Higher Education named Mr. Driscoll, 50, as the new president of IUP effective July 1. He will replace David J. Werner, who became interim president in August 2010 after President Tony Atwater left.

—“New president named for IUP,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, January 20, 2012

As proof that it was in fact a national search to find the next president of the largest of the state-owned universities, the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education looked as far away as Alaska to find a candidate for the presidency at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. University of Alaska provost and executive vice chancellor Michael Driscoll, 50, was hired by the system's board of governors to succeed David Werner, who has served as interim president since August 2010.

—“University of Alaska provost Michael Driscoll tapped to be next president at Indiana University of Pennsylvania,”
Harrisburg Patriot-News, January 19, 2012

However you name it, Festival is a beast: This year, its 44th, it gathered more than 1,100 college students, faculty and theater professionals on the campus of Indiana University of Pennsylvania for five intense days of theater -- full productions, auditions, designing, playwriting, dramaturgy, tech work, a fringe festival, workshops and even review writing.

—“Local playwright Tammy Ryan's still developing play, 'Lindsey's Oyster,' among the 8 productions staged at IUP during the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival,”
PIttsburgh Post-Gazette, January 18, 2012

Former star Penn State and Pittsburgh Steelers running back Franco Harris says he won't run for a seat on the university's board of trustees but supports others trying to oust members for their handling of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal and the firing of legendary head football coach Joe Paterno. "I think if I were still teaching, I would give them a F-minus," said J. David Truby, a retired Indiana University of Pennsylvania journalism professor and Penn State alum who penned a workbook on crisis communications in public relations. "In public relations, especially crisis public relations, the first thing you want to do is go into the positive mode," Truby said. "The first thing they needed to do was say 'What can we as an institution with all we have behind us do to help make this better for the victims?' What they did was the exact opposite, and it just reflects back on Penn State."

—“ Franco Harris urges other alumni to remove board of trustees,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 14, 2012

The conference, to be held March 3 at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, is a premiere event for wind ensembles and college bands.

—“ Hudson Valley Chamber Winds earns conference performance,”
Times Herald-Record, January 12, 2012

HARRISBURG — In his classes at the University of Pittsburgh, political communications professor Jerry Shuster sometimes referred to Gov. Tom Corbett as "GIH," for governor in hiding, because people rarely saw him during budget negotiations. "Rendell did a better job of 'talking the talk,' " said David Chambers, a political science professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“ Gov. Corbett shuns limelight his predecessor often seemed to seek,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 9, 2012

Church affiliation got fans a $2 discount at California University of Pennsylvania's basketball games on Friday night. While the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education does not ban religious promotions at its 14 universities, a civil liberties advocate called it "discriminatory," and officials at other universities said they would not offer discounts to religious groups. "I don't think it's something we would consider, no," said Mike Powers, a spokesman for Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Basketball fans with religious ties offered cheaper tickets at Cal U,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, January 7, 2012

SLIPPERY ROCK, Pa. -- William Williams will become interim president of Slippery Rock University on Feb. 11 following the retirement of Robert Smith. Williams has served as SRU's provost and vice president of academic affairs since 2003. Williams received his doctorate in English literature from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and his bachelor's and master's degrees in English from Youngstown State University. Before teaching at SRU, he taught at West Virginia Northern Community College and at YSU and was a teaching fellow at Kent State University while undertaking graduate work.

—“YSU Grad Named Interim President at SRU,”
Business Journal Daily, January 10, 2012

McKeesport has a new city administrator. At its reorganization meeting Monday, council chose Matt Gergely to replace city administrator Dennis Pittman, who had held the top city management position for eight years. Council also replaced solicitor Bruce Dice with former solicitor Jason Elash. It elected Darryl Segina as the new council president and swore in new council members Keith Soles and Dan Carr. Mr. Gergely, 32, grew up in White Oak and recently moved to McKeesport. He was a supervisor with the State Workers' Insurance Fund. He earned a bachelor's degree in communications from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. His salary will be $66,500.

—“McKeesport: Council hires new city administrator,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, January 5, 2012

Bill Vitzakovitch thinks he first heard Jim Wansacz actually speak the words when they were sophomores at Lakeland High School. It happened during a discussion in an American history or government class, and Mr. Vitzakovitch said he may not have laughed out loud, but he and his friends were at least bemused by the pronouncement. "Jimmy just said, 'I will get into politics.' I remember him saying that," said Mr. Vitzakovitch, who lives in Greenfield Twp. "He was always a confident person. That is one thing about Jim - he is very confident. He always had the qualities, but knowing him as well as I did, I don't know. "I mean, I saw him doing it, but we were young." Mr. Wansacz, 39, will open the next chapter in his fulfillment of that youthful ambition on Monday, when the former 114th District state representative from Old Forge is sworn in as Lackawanna County commissioner. He will join incumbent Democrat Corey O'Brien in the majority, giving them the reins of county government for the next four years. After earning his bachelor's in business management at IUP, he set his sights on pursuing a master's degree in business administration at Arizona State University, with the idea of going into consulting. He was at Arizona State looking over the campus when his father became ill.

—“Wansacz opens new chapter in political career,”
The Times-Tribune, January 1, 2012

INDIANA -- A program to feed hungry Indiana County grade school kids on weekends is expanding in 2012 to include more children although distributions of the food will be occurring less frequently. The Power Pack program is offered through Indiana County Community Action Program's Food Bank. The Association of Professional State College University Faculty at Indiana University of Pennsylvania recently donated $1,250 to the program. Such donations help a lot because "any amount of money can go a long way," Desi Jackson said. IUP students have organized events with the Power Pack program in mind, she added. The Junior Women's League of Indiana also has come to the aid of the program. In 2011, the cost for one child per distribution was $5. "That amount gave them 8-12 different items to use during breakfast, lunch, dinner or at snack times," Desi Jackson said. David Loomis, a journalism professor who chairs the APSCUF Outreach Committee at IUP, said the group likely will continue to try to help the Power Pack program. "It's hair-raising what is going on out there in terms of hunger. We don't see it teaching middle class kids," but hunger is real, he said.

—“Weekend meal program to expand,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 30, 2011

A supervisor for three Pittsburgh police officers accused of beating Homewood teen Jordan Miles during a 2010 arrest testified during depositions that the officers had a history of lying and skirting department policies, according to an expert hired by Miles' attorney. "The evidence ... indicates to me the code of silence is alive and well in the Pittsburgh (police department)," wrote R. Paul McCauley, a retired criminology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, in a court report filed on Thursday in U.S. District Court, Downtown.

—“Report: 'Code of silence' lives on among Pittsburgh cops,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 29, 2011

An expert hired by Jordan Miles' legal team in his federal civil rights suit against the city of Pittsburgh says three plainclothes police officers had no reason to stop him on a Homewood street last year and used excessive force in subduing him during an arrest near his house. In a report filed today as part of the case, R. Paul McCauley, a retired professor of criminology from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, also said that one officer, Richard Ewing, fabricated statements from a witness in an affidavit.

—“Cops had no reason to stop Jordan Miles, legal filing contends,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 29, 2011

It was a "big deal" when a team of five student-volunteer firefighters with the Indiana (Pa.) Fire Association was able to save a sleeping man from a burning apartment building on Oct. 20, IFA President Bill Simmons said. "It was my first fire rescue," said Matthew Reynolds of Cochranville, who was one of the firefighters on the scene. On Dec. 16, the Council of Trustees at IUP honored Reynolds and the four other volunteer firefighters who responded to the fire in October and saved a man's life.

—“Cochranville firefighter honored for rescue, service,”
Daily Local, December 22, 2011

John David Dryer found his calling as a teenager when he nursed to health a horse that had become entangled in barbed wire. He turned his grades around, earned his veterinary science degree from Ohio State University, opened his own successful practice -- and then became a police officer. But a traffic stop on Interstate 70 late Sunday brought the unimaginable. Officer Dryer pulled over a minivan whose driver fatally shot him and wounded another officer, Robert V. Caldwell, who had responded as backup. He put himself through Indiana University of Pennsylvania's municipal police officers training academy, despite his family's concerns for his safety. "He was interested in making sure people did right," said Gary Smith, a cousin and confidante. "In this day and age, that's a tall order."

—“Veterinarian turned cop felled by shots,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 20, 2011

A lot of research has shown how women hide their aggression, lust, and other qualities once considered masculine in order to fulfill the feminine ideal of a chaste and gentle peacemaker. But far less work has been done on whether men conceal their feelings, perhaps because researchers assumed men had no reason to. Women repressed their sexual, violent, and power-hungry urges, the conventional wisdom went, while men let it all hang out. But this isn't necessarily true, according to research that Christian Vaccaro, a sociologist from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, has done on male mixed martial artists. The study will appear in the December issue of Social Psychology Quarterly.

—“Men Are Fearful, Just Conceal It Better Than Women: Study,”
Huffington Post, December 16, 2011

He likely was not alone that day in making such a Decision. According to the Office for National Statistics, approximately 5,675 people in the United Kingdom completed suicide in 2009, amounting to an average of almost 16 such Decisions per day. My mind went to him, lying on the tracks. Who was this person? What led to his Decision? Did anyone try to intervene? What had happened in his life the weekend preceding his Decision? What overwhelming stressors did he face? Did he have a family? Close friends? A counselor? How was the train engineer? Most important, how could he have arrived at a different decision and not The Decision?

—“"A Decision without details," by John McCarthy,
Counseling Today, December 11, 2011

Involvement in community watch programs remains strong even as crime rates are dropping nationally. However, research shows that they're frequently set up in affluent, suburban communities that least need them, said David Myers, criminology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. "In these cases, they have little or no effect because there's not much crime there," he said.The greater result, Myers said, is a reduction in the fear of crime.

—“Crime watches increasing; police cite their effectiveness,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, December 11, 2011

In 1962, as a reporter for the Boston College student newspaper, Charles J. McCollester covered a speech at Holy Cross College. Today, he is retired as a director and professor of labor relations at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, among other labor-oriented roles. In October, as president of the Battle of Homestead Foundation, which is devoted to preserving labor's heritage, Mr. McCollester, of Mount Washington, was instrumental in obtaining historic marker status for the McKeesport hotel where future U.S. presidents Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon debated the Taft-Hartley Act in 1947.

—“A newsmaker you should know: Educator devoted career to passions of labor, history,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 8, 2011

... one of Pittsburgh's most beloved bands, The Clarks celebrated its 25th anniversary with a show at Stage AE in June. The band started the year performing at the NHL's Winter Classic on New Year's Day, and also played its 2,000th show and released a new EP, "Songs in G."

—“Biggest stories of 2011 -- Pittsburgh Pop, Rock and Rap,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 8, 2011

So it's welcome news that, for the first time in its 35 years of existence, the Appalachian Studies Conference is being held north of the Mason-Dixon Line. Hundreds of regional scholars will gather March 23-25 at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. "Polka music, not just old-timey Scots-Irish fiddle music, is Appalachian," says Jim Cahalan, an English professor at IUP and an organizer of this conference. > I was taken aback by that claim. How can music as Eastern European as the pierogi also be Appalachian? But Mr. Cahalan believes we need to redefine the people of Appalachia as "whoever's here,'' and Southern and Eastern Europeans have been here for generations.

—“Yes, we and yinz are part of Appalachia,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 8, 2011

"Most colleges force a student to take medical leave only as a last resort when responding to a student who is at risk of harming him- or herself. But in some cases, many student affairs officials say, it’s the best option. And the “significant departure” from OCR’s previous position is causing concern at many institutions, said John Wesley Lowery, associate professor of higher education at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, even though the involuntary leave is a last resort in most places. "It is, in my sense, on those campuses exceptionally rare, except for the largest of institutions that also have very large residential populations,” Lowery said. “It is in a residential environment that often the troubling behaviors that bring a student to the institution’s attention happen.”

—“Danger for Whom,”
Inside Higher Ed, December 6, 2011

"Washington, Dec 4 (ANI): Girls already start monitoring the sexual behaviour of others by the time they reach eighth grade and almost 70 percent of students have experienced some kind of non-physical sexual harassment, including "slut bashing" in middle and high school, a new study has found. According to Maureen McHugh, a professor of psychology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, "slut bashing", which means spreading sexual rumours about other females, may have long-term consequences like decreased self-esteem, depression or even suicide.

—“70 pc school students in US experience 'non-physical' sexual harassment,”
Newstrack India, December 4, 2011

" In a sobering echo of earlier teen suicides, a 10-year-old Illinois girl took her life Nov. 11 after allegedly experiencing two years of bullying at school. And although Ashlynn Conner was just in fifth grade, her mother says her peers taunted her by calling her a slut. As nonsensical as the word seems applied to a child, it's a common refrain for young teen and tween bullies, according to psychologist Maureen McHugh of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, who studies bullying, sexual harassment, and especially "slut-bashing," the practice of peers labeling other peers as dirty and promiscuous, oftentimes in the absence of any sexual activity at all on the part of the victim. "Their peers know what kinds of words to use to hurt them," McHugh told LiveScience, adding that sexuality becomes an Achilles heel in the beginning of adolescence. "Their sexuality is emerging," McHugh said. "It's a kind of vulnerability."

—“Bullies Use Sexual Taunts to Hurt Teen Girls,”
Crosswalk.com, December 2, 2011

" As nonsensical as the word seems applied to a child, it's a common refrain for young teen and tween bullies, according to psychologist Maureen McHugh of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, who studies bullying, sexual harassment, and especially "slut-bashing," the practice of peers labeling other peers as dirty and promiscuous, oftentimes in the absence of any sexual activity at all on the part of the victim. "Their peers know what kinds of words to use to hurt them," McHugh told LiveScience, adding that sexuality becomes an Achilles heel in the beginning of adolescence. "Their sexuality is emerging," McHugh said. "It's a kind of vulnerability."

—“Bullies Use Sexual Taunts to Hurt Teen Girls,”
LiveScience, November 29, 2011

" INDIANA, Pa., Nov. 28 (UPI) -- Calling a girl a slut often has nothing to do with sexual behavior -- it is a weapon used by girls in adolescence to hurt other girls, U.S. researchers said. Dr. Maureen McHugh, professor of psychology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, said girls have begun by eighth grade to monitor the sexual conduct of other girls, and 70 percent of students have experienced some kind of non-physical sexual harassment, including sexual rumor spreading -- known as "slut bashing." However, girls and women who are labeled sluts may not even be sexually active, McHugh said. "Many claim there is no sexual double standard anymore but levels of slut bashing suggest double standards still operate. Slut bashing is a common social practice," McHugh said in a statement. "However, it becomes apparent immediately that the label slut is not really about objecting to the sexual behavior of a girl, but is used as a weapon to hurt girls and women. It is frequently not about the sexual behavior of the target. It is a form of relational aggression."

—“Slut epithet has little to do with sex,”
United Press International, November 28, 2011

" For students at Greenock and Mt. Vernon elementary schools in Elizabeth Forward School District, it's not uncommon to see principal Jennifer Meliton take center stage to emcee various assemblies and class activities. "I've sung for a long time but I've really just started to get back into it," said Meliton, who was active with performing arts while she attended Indiana University of Pennsylvania in the early 1990s.

—“EF elementary principal heads to Byham as holiday show vocalist,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 25, 2011

" The Woodland Hills School District and the Propel system of charter schools were awarded a grant from the Heinz Endowments last week to implement programs to help academic achievement among black male students. The Foundation for Indiana University of Pennsylvania received a $361,500 grant under the same program to recruit black men into the teaching profession.

—“Woodland Hills, Propel schools get grants to aid black males,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, November 23, 2011

" George Santucci, who graduated from Duquesne in 1988 with a degree in business administration, oversees the college's financial-aid program, including scholarships, grants, loans, part-time work-study employment and federal and state programs. Saint Vincent College has 1,930 undergraduate and graduate students, Santucci said. Santucci, who has a master's degree in adult and community education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, has worked in the financial-aid area for more than 20 years.

—“Life experiences guide Santucci through professional journey,”
Plum Advance Leader, November 23, 2011

" Some people say it looks like Danna Eve Rzecznik's art might walk away any minute. Rzecznik, 32, a ceramics artist who will be featured in Sweetwater Center for the Art's 17th annual Holiday mART, which is planned from Sunday through Dec. 4 at the center at 200 Broad St., Sewickley, said most of her art has legs. She now is studying for her master's degree in fine arts, with ceramics as a concentration, at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where her art will be in another show Dec. 2 and 3.

—“Sweetwater's annual Holiday mART opening this weekend,”
Swickley Herald, November 23, 2011

" Jonathan Nagy, 28, is the executive chef who has brought new flavor to the Grille Room menu at Lenape Heights since his arrival in 2010. His philosophy is all about serving up traditional dishes with a contemporary twist -- using fresh, local and in-season ingredients. The result is a sensory delight that pleases the eye and palate. Nagy ... graduating from Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Academy of Culinary Arts in Punxsutawney.

—“Lenape Heights chef enjoys foraging for food,”
Kittanning Leader-Times, November 22, 2011

" Certain topics are taboo in families, communities and societies. Don't talk about them. Avoid them. They're uncomfortable, unsettling and simply awkward. Politics and religion may head the list in some places. Add subjects such as racism and AIDS to other settings. And then there is suicide, the intentional taking of one's own life. It's on The List for many. Stop reading here. There's probably another story on this page of more interest. (By) John McCarthy is a professor in the Department of Counseling at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a member of the Westmoreland County Suicide Awareness and Prevention Task Force (jmccarth@iup.edu).

—“Let's talk about suicide: It claims more lives than homicide, yet we hardly speak of it,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, November 17, 2011

" Our schools of higher learning have over the years developed specialized entities such as work force development centers and business incubators. Many have met with our business and industry leaders to hear about employee needs and then went about setting up programs to provide graduates with the skills necessary to fill those positions. Our hats, as always, are off to St. Francis, Pitt-Johnstown, Mount Aloysius, IUP, Pennsylvania Highlands Community College, Allegany Community College of Maryland’s Somerset campus and Cambria-Rowe Business College. Their work makes our region proud – and stronger.

—“Colleges, universities paying dividends for entire region,”
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, November 17, 2011

" Paul Binai is an observer, historian, curator and aesthete, qualities that have informed him as an artist but also kept him cloistered from the world of big art which builds reputation. The exhibition, "Paul Binai: Fifty-Year Retrospective," at the University Museum, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, is a well-deserved recognition of his achievements, ranging from his earliest painting to a sampling of the collage work he's turned to in more recent years.

—“For 50 years, artist Paul Binai has been capturing the feeling of the subject,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, November 16, 2011

" Brad McGarry has been named coordinator of the Asperger Initiative at Mercyhurst. Since earning his master's degree in community counseling from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1999, he's worked in numerous positions in the mental health field, most recently as executive director of the Union City Family Support Center. He has also been an outpatient therapist and served for seven years as adjunct faculty in Mercyhurst's psychology department. He developed a curriculum on family group decision making that is being used across Pennsylvania and helped develop and then directed an intensive day treatment program for children diagnosed with ADHD and other disruptive behavior disorders.

—“People on the Move,”
Erie Times-News, November 13, 2011

" The utterance "I keep busy" is an understatement when it comes to the day-to-day activities of Brock Snedeker, a Parkway West Career & Technology Center administrator. In 2009, Mr. Snedeker earned a bachelor's degree in education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated magna cum laude.

—“A newsmaker you should know: Parkway West exec stays busy as paramedic, firefighter too,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, November 10, 2011

" Noteworthy: Branthoover received the 2011 Pennsylvania Counselor Association President's Award. The association is affiliated with the American Counseling Association, a 600-member organization that promotes the growth of the counseling profession. Occupation: Associate professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania; associate in a private therapy practice, North Hills Psychological Services Background: Branthoover is a past president of the state association, in addition to holding other leadership positions. She is a nationally certified counselor and a licensed professional counselor in the state. Education: Bachelor's degree, IUP, 1993.

—“Newsmaker: Holly Branthoover,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 9, 2011

" Researchers have rescued a 19th-century field diary by the Scottish missionary and explorer David Livingstone from literal obscurity, using 21st-century imaging and processing technology to make his writing legible after the ink had nearly vanished from the page. The diary “gives a much more complete, rounded picture of how Livingstone responded to this,” said Adrian S. Wisnicki, an assistant professor of British literature at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and director of the imaging project, which published the diary online last week.Dr. Wisnicki helped uncover the diary in 2009 while working on a book about Victorian-era travel in Africa. The document was in archives at Livingstone’s birthplace in Blantyre, Scotland (now a museum), but it was in bits and pieces. “Eventually we had the whole diary,” he said, “but you couldn’t read it.”

—“Restored: Fading Account From the Heart of Africa,”
New York Times, November 7, 2011

" Historically, gas wells and even mines are not foreign to Pennsylvania's state university campuses. Generations ago, Slippery Rock students brought back coal from a university-owned mine to heat campus buildings, school spokesman Karl Schwab said. Indiana University of Pennsylvania once had gas wells that helped serve the campus. While the law has long required that money earned from gas and oil production must revert to the state, legislation working its way through the House and Senate would allow the 14 State System universities to use the earnings. The House bill, whose lead sponsor is Matthew Baker, R-Tioga, and a member of the State System's board of governors, would allocate 60 percent of the proceeds to campuses with deposits and 40 percent to the others; the Senate version flips that ratio, and its lead sponsor is Sen. Don White, R-Indiana. At least four State System schools -- California, Indiana, Lock Haven and Mansfield -- are built atop Marcellus Shale, said Mr. Marshall, system spokesman. Clarion and Slippery Rock also may be above a deposit.

—“Drilling on Campus: Marcellus Shale boom puts colleges at crossroads,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, November 6, 2011

" Four area students were among those who graduated recently from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Graduates are Lawrence B. Bengough of Hendrix Lane, Phoenixville, master of science degree in safety sciences; Nicole Jane Ramberger of Royersford, bachelor of science in finance; Michael P. Carpenter of Collegeville, master of science in sport science, and Samantha Jo Devine of Pennsburg, bachelor of science in communications media.

—“Area students are making the grade,”
Pottstown Mercury, November 6, 2011

" Colleagues, Jack Wagner is in the Nov. 4 issue of the Pittsburgh Business-Times for the education section. Thank you all for your help on this project! It was the early 1970s, a time of antiwar college protests, when Jack Wagner, a short-haired former Marine, stepped onto Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Kittanning campus as an undergrad. He was 23 years old and dubbed “the old man” by his four roommates. Joe Cali, who was 18 and wore a long shag, was nicknamed “the young kid.” “I don’t know what he thought he was getting himself into with all these young kids,” said Cali, who now chairs the Department of Safety Management at Slippery Rock University.

—“Education at IUP proves vital for unplanned career as public official,”
Pittsburgh Business-Times, November 4, 2011

" The following students graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania: Kurt Bingaman, bachelor’s degree in management/entrepreneurship and small business; Christina Ellis, bachelor’s degree in communications media; Amie Englehart, bachelor’s degree in journalism; Erin Longenecker, bachelor’s degree in nursing; Selali Mensah, bachlor’s degree in accounting; Melody Osborn, bachelor’s degree in fashion merchandising; Andrew Shaw, bachelor’s degree in safety sciences, of Harrisburg; and Yolonda Mosley of Swatara Township, bachelor’s degree in psychology.

—“East Shore students receive recognition,”
Harrisburg Patriot-News, November 3, 2011

" Dr Livingstone's diary. Dr Adrian S.Wasnicki (left), a member of the scientific and technical team who have recovered the text from Dr David Livingstone's diary from 140 years ago at a press conference in Edinburgh

—“,”
Associated Press, November 1, 2011

"(AP) -- He is one of history's most famous explorers, and his first-person account of a 19th-century massacre in Africa helped lead to the closure of one of the continent's most notorious slave markets. Now researchers say they have evidence Dr. David Livingstone may not have been telling the whole truth. An international team of academics used spectral imaging technology to decode Livingstone's long-illegible field diary and say it hints that his own men may have participated in the atrocity. "Livingstone's party might have been involved in the massacre," said Adrian Wisnicki of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, who directed the project. But he advised caution: "We're only beginning to analyze the evidence."

—“Researchers now presume that Dr Livingstone lied,”
CBS News, November 2, 2011

"His first-person account of a 19th-century massacre in Africa helped to close one of the continent's most notorious slave markets. But researchers now believe legendary explorer Dr David Livingstone may not have been telling the whole truth. Using a procedure known as spectral imaging, an international team of academics believe they have decoded his long-illegible field diary and say it hints that his own men may have participated in the atrocity. Adrian Wisnicki of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, who directed the project, said: 'Livingstone's party might have been involved in the massacre.' But he advised caution: 'We're only beginning to analyze the evidence.'

—“Dr Livingstone lied, scientists presume: Spectral imaging uncovers discrepancies in explorer's account of slave massacre,”
Daily Mail (UK) Online, November 3, 2011

"Pages from explorer David Livingstone’s diary can be read for the first time after modern technology helped recover the words. The diary includes an account of the massacre of 400 slaves which was later told to a journalist and helped abolish slave trade. Livingstone wrote the journal on the paper he had, a copy of the London Standard, in ink made from berry seeds. In the African heat the manuscript deteriorated and is now almost invisible to the naked eye. The scholar who led the project to restore the manuscript said there is evidence in his diary that members of Livingstone’s party were involved in the killing. Dr Adrian Wisnicki said: "Livingstone seems to have considered this possibility and this, together with his failure to intervene, appears to have left him with a profound sense of remorse.

—“Explorer David Livingstone's diary unveiled for the first time,”
Scotland TV (STV), November 1, 2011

"LONDON (AP) — He is one of history's most famous explorers, and his first-person account of a 19th-century massacre in Africa helped lead to the closure of one of the continent's most notorious slave markets. Now researchers say they have evidence Dr. David Livingstone may not have been telling the whole truth. An international team of academics used spectral imaging technology to decode Livingstone's long-illegible field diary and say it hints that his own men may have participated in the atrocity. "Livingstone's party might have been involved in the massacre," said Adrian Wisnicki of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, who directed the project. But he advised caution: "We're only beginning to analyze the evidence."

—“Newly deciphered diary muddles Livingstone legend,”
Associated Press, November 2, 2011

"Explorer David Livingstone has been credited with ending the east African slave trade by reporting a massacre of slaves in 1871. A new analysis of his original diary entries, however, shows that he sanitised his account. Deciphered through sophisticated digital imaging techniques, the entries reveal his previously unreported hunger to avenge the massacre of 400 out of 1500 slaves gathered for sale in a market in Nyangwe, a village in what is now the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. They were slaughtered by slave traders firing indiscriminately into the throng. "He was clearly furious, bewildered and devastated by what had happened," says project director Adrian Wisnicki of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, who is also a research fellow at Birkbeck, University of London.

—“Paper scans unmask Livingstone's fury at slave killing,”
NewScientist, November 2, 2011

"A diary written 140 years ago by Scots explorer David Livingstone can now be read for the first time after experts shed new light on the badly-faded text. Scientists used spectral imaging to recover the account of the massacre of 400 slaves, which had been written on old newspaper with makeshift ink. However, Dr Adrian Wisnicki, who led the project, said there was evidence in the diary that suggested members of Livingstone's party might have been involved in the massacre. "Livingstone seems to have considered this possibility and this, together with his failure to intervene, appears to have left him with a profound sense of remorse," said Dr Wisnicki, assistant professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and honorary research fellow at Birkbeck College, London.

—“Experts shed light on David Livingstone massacre diary,”
BBC (Edinburgh, Fife & East Scotland), November 1, 2011

"Seeing lives change everyday is what has made Leslie Grenfell's career rewarding. And the 58-year-old Monongahela resident and long-time executive director of the Southwestern Pennsylvania Area Agency on Aging has expanded her role in helping to ensure that residents across the state have a growing network of social services. Since 2001, Grenfell has been the head of the local Area Agency on Aging, which is one of 52 in Pennsylvania. In July, the Washington, Pa., native became president of the Pennsylvania Association of Area Agencies on Aging board of directors, after her peers nominated her for the post. After graduating from Trinity High School in 1971, Grenfell earned a bachelor of science degree in rehabilitation counseling at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“'Everyday there is an inspiring story',”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 1, 2011

"The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics projects an 11-percent job increase in the safety industry over the next seven years, and IUP is hoping to help students capitalize on that boom. In 2013, the university will introduce its newest doctoral program,a Doctor of Philosophy in Safety Sciences. The program, IUP’s eleventh doctoral degree, is intended to give students the tools to recognize, evaluate and control safety, health and other work place hazards. In addition, IUP’s early aims include: enabling graduates to pursue independent research; giving students a better understanding of state and federal policies governing health, safety and the environment; and preparing new Ph.D.s to teach in professional and academic settings. Students will be able to take classes year-round, both on campus and online, allowing for working professionals to earn the degree. University officials say interest in the program is high, and they hope to have at least 20 students in the first cohort when the program begins.

—“IUP introduces elite public-safety program,”
Pittsburgh Magazine.com, October 2011

"At some point, the newspaper pages were misplaced. But in 2009, Adrian Wisnicki, a professor of British literature at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, learned of their existence from a catalogue of Livingstone documents. He set out on a quest to find them — and then to decipher their almost illegible script, with the help of a technology team that has collaborated with such institutions as the Library of Congress to examine documents from Thomas Jefferson’s first draft of the Declaration of Independence to an original Beethoven score.

—“Dr. Livingstone’s diary on 19th-century Africa, now uncensored,”
Washington Post, November 1, 2011

"Brian Foster-Pegg, of Erie, has been selected as the 2011 recipient of the Bill Sugra Memorial Scholarship at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Foster-Pegg is a finance major in IUP's Eberly College of Business and Information Technology. He was selected for the scholarship based on academic talent and financial need. Foster-Pegg is the son of Gail and Tim Foster-Pegg and is a 2009 graduate of McDowell High School. He is in the university's information technology honors program. He is president of the Student Finance Association and works with the university's student managed investment portfolio group. The scholarship is named for the late Bill Sugra, a 1993 graduate of IUP's Eberly College of Business and Information Technology who was killed in the attack on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

—“College Clan,”
Erie Times-News, October 31, 2011

"The Ringgold Rams Club's fourth annual Hall of Fame banquet will take place Thursday at the high school in Carroll Township. The eight-member class of 2011 will be inducted at the event, which will feature a 5:30 p.m. reception and a 6 p.m. dinner. James B. Renacci grew up in Carroll Township and graduated in 1976 from the Donora campus of Ringgold High School. He received a bachelor's degree in business administration from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. As a certified public accountant, Renacci spent several years with the Pittsburgh office of Grant Thorton International. His career included the ownership and management of more than 60 businesses, including: two minor league sports teams, three Harley Davidson dealerships, a Chevrolet dealership, two golf courses, a concert venue, health care facilities, and a real estate development company. The former mayor of Wadsworth, Ohio, he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010. Renacci serves on the Financial Services Committee and is vice chairman of the Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit Subcommittee.

—“Rams Hall of Fame grows,”
Monessen Valley Independent, October 29, 2011

"Andrew Leopold, the new superintendent in the Hempfield Area School District, began his career as a U.S. and world history teacher. He played football at Steel Valley High School and at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, which influenced his career direction. "I realized I loved to be around people and wanted to help them through teaching and also by coaching football and baseball," he said.

—“Newsmakers: Andrew Leopold,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, October 27, 2011

"At schools throughout Western Pennsylvania, students recovering from addictions can find counseling and information about off-campus resources to help with their recovery. Indiana University of Pennsylvania students can opt for clean-and-sober living facilities. Students can choose to live on the SOAR floor (Students Opting for an Alcohol and Drug-free Residence) in the Suites on Maple East, said Ann Sesti, assistant director for IUP's Center for Health and Well-being. "Most of the people who opt to live on that floor are choosing (it) more for health or lifestyle reasons than recovery," Sesti said. "It certainly is a supportive atmosphere for individuals who are in recovery and returning to the community and IUP." IUP does not offer on-campus group support meetings, though it has. Counselors post information about AA and Narcotics Anonymous meetings within walking distance of campus, Sesti said.

—“Counseling, off-campus resources teem in Western Pennsylvania,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 26, 2011

"After cutting funding to Pennsylvania's 14 state-owned universities this year, state lawmakers have taken up a series of bills that are supposed to help the institutions deal with the shortfall. Unfortunately, many of the institutions would find it difficult to take advantage of the proposed changes precisely because of the reduced state funding. One proposal before the state Senate Education Committee would allow state universities to expand their doctoral degree offerings. Indiana University of Pennsylvania is the only state-owned university that offers doctorates. As witnesses pointed out during a committee hearing, it would be difficult for any of the universities to establish new doctoral programs while dealing with state budget cuts that threaten even existing undergraduate programs.

—“Help colleges: Fund them,”
Scranton Times-Tribune, October 24, 2011

"Although faculty members support many initiatives, the president of the union that represents 6,000 faculty members and coaches said the group is concerned about starting expensive new doctoral programs. In the past, only Indiana University of Pennsylvania, whose Ph.D. program predated the creation of the state system, was permitted to offer doctoral programs. Under the proposed changes, it would remain the only school offering a doctor of philosophy, or Ph.D., which is conferred for original research. But other schools could offer applied doctorates, which are post-graduate degrees in work force skills and advanced practice in areas such as nursing and education, provided they can document demand.

—“Bills aim to help put state schools on 'level playing field',”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 23, 2011

"The 2011 Artists’ Hall of Fame, sponsored by Bottle Works Ethnic Arts Center, will recognize an educator and acclaimed artist and its first husband-and-wife honorees. This year’s honors go to Sally Stewart of Richland Township and Brad and Laura Gordon of Westmont. Stewart, a retired art instructor from Greater Johnstown School District, has a reputation of being a champion of the arts. “Of course, this is a wonderful honor,” she said. “It’s nice to be considered successful in the place you live.” Stewart contends that art is right up there with the core subjects of English, mathematics and science, and research has supported the strong relationship between learning in the arts and the capacity to master other subjects. Enjoying art early in life, she wanted to share what she created and enable others to experience the same satisfaction. “The decision to become a teacher was a natural one,” she said. “Art helps kids find out who they are.” Stewart earned an undergraduate and master’s degree in art education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. In 1985, IUP honored Stewart with its Outstanding Alumni Award.

—“Distinguished Artists: Three area residents selected for achievements,”
Johnstown Tribune Democrat, October 22, 2011

"Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Small Business Development Center provides small business owners and entrepreneurs with education, information and tools to help build and expand their companies. The center is one of 18 resource hubs throughout the state that are working to provide valuables for startups and existing operations in Pennsylvania. Pittsburgh Live reported the center offers small business owners and entrepreneurs with workshops and seminars hosted by industry experts offering valuable insights and best practices to nurture successful enterprises. "When you start a business it can be overwhelming," said SBDC director Tony Palamone, "and we've done a lot of work with start-ups, developing a business plan to get financing, looking at bookkeeping and focusing on marketing, which is more than just buying ads."

—“Mentoring Resources And Information For Small Business Owners,”
Resources for Entrepreneurs, October 17, 2011

"The Journal of Applied Social Psychology published a study that supported a commonly accepted social phenomenon - that women eat less when in the company of men. Researchers studied the eating habits of students at a food court at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. 166 participants recorded what they purchased during lunch and dinner hours. They found that women purchased an average of 833 calories when eating only with other women, while that average dropped to 721 calories in the company of men.Perhaps more interesting were the results for men: they purchased significantly more on average in the company of women (1162 calories) than when they're just with the guys (952 calories).

—“Do you eat more or less in the company of the opposite sex?,”
CBC News (Canada), October 5, 2011

"Earlier today, students from at least 100 college campuses around the country walked out of class in a show of solidarity and support for the Occupy Wall Street movement.While the Occupy Wall Street movement has yet to present a coherent agenda or message, the college students who marched today in support of it were clear about their concerns. Elsewhere, David Michael Ball, a 20-year-old freshman at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, organized his school's walkout. As the clock struck 12, he and 41 other classmates gathered in a common area at the center of campus, where they read speeches, aired the demands of the Occupy Wall Street protesters and then spent another hour addressing the issues they faced as students, namely, the cost of tuition, student loans and the minimum wage. "It was empowering to finally feel like we were doing something that mattered for the world," said Ball, who hopes the student-led branch of the movement continues to gain traction.

—“College Sympathizers Of Occupy Wall Street Walk Out Of Class In Support,”
Huffington Post, October 5, 2011

"It's not just the company we keep that influences how much we eat. A new study suggests it's the sex of the people around us that leads us to consume more or less food. Researchers from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and the University of Akron found that the average number of calories college students consumed varied depending on whether they ate with men, women or a mixed-sex group.

—“Gender of Eating Companions Influences How Much People Eat,”
ABC News, October 4, 2011

"MAINTAINING strong social ties in the aftermath of natural disasters is just as important as rebuilding infrastructure to help people overcome traumatic events, a leading US psychologist says. Professor Krzysztof Kaniasty is visiting Australia this week with a key message for governments around the country as they gear up for another season of bushfires and floods. Prof Kaniasty says governments need to develop long-term plans to maintain a sense of community in the months after a natural disaster hits to stop them becoming "social catastrophes." Such plans were just as important as supplying food, housing, rebuilding roads, firewalls, bridges and churches in the immediate aftermath of a disaster like the Black Saturday bushfires which devastated Victoria in 2009, he said.

—“'Focus on community' after natural disasters,”
Herald Sun, Australia, October 5, 2011

"Former CIA operations officer Valerie Plame Wilson and her husband, U.S. diplomat Joseph Wilson, will be the speakers at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's First Commonwealth Endowed Lecture on Nov. 14. The couple will present, "The Politics of Truth: Inside the Valerie Plame Wilson CIA Leak Controversy." The lecture, presented as part of the Lively Arts` Ideas and Issues lecture series, will be held at 8 p.m., Nov. 14, in Fisher Auditorium in the IUP Performing Arts Center, Indiana. Admission is free, but tickets are required. Tickets will be available by phone at 724-357-1313, starting Oct. 11.

—“Valerie, Joseph Wilson to speak at Indiana University of Pennsylvania,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, October 4, 2011

"Both men and women appear to choose larger portions when they eat with women, and both men and women choose smaller portions when they eat in the company of men, according to new research published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology. The study, conducted among a sample of 127 college students, suggests that both men and women are influenced by unconscious scripts about how to behave in each other's company. And, these scripts change the way men and women eat when they eat together and when they eat apart. Molly Allen-O'Donnell, then a graduate student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, wanted to find out if what we eat is influenced by our peers. Allen-O'Donnell sat at a popular college eatery and observed how much food people purchased for lunch and dinner.

—“Eating Meals With Men May Mean Eating Less,”
The Salt, NPR's Food Blog, October 4, 2011

"Specialty courts for people charged with drug or alcohol offenses provide a good alternative for non-violent offenders, according to one legal expert. Martha Troxell, professor of legal studies, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, presented her findings on specialty courts in the state to The Center for Rural Pennsylvania Board. "I think they work," she told the board, which met at Pennsylvania College of Technology Friday. "They are cost-effective. They put productive citizens back in society who otherwise would not have a chance."

—“Specialty courts praised,”
Williamsport Sun-Gazette, October 4, 2011

"Even now, three years retired from his job as chancellor of Penn State New Kensington, Larry Pollock still gives back to the campus. In recognition of his work, a three-tier fountain was dedicated in his name on Saturday as part of the Upper Burrell campus' Fall Festival. Pollock's path to Penn State New Kensington began at Clarion University, where he studied until transferring to Penn State for its art education program. He earned advanced degrees from Drexel University, Rowan University in New Jersey and Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He also served in the Marine Corps.

—“Super Students,”
Valley News Dispatch, October 3, 2011

"Christie DeVito of Lake Ariel is among the 100 students chosen this year for Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Robert E. Cook Honors College. The daughter of Daniel and Mary DeVito, Christie is a 2011 graduate of Western Wayne High School.

—“Super Students,”
Scranton Times-Tribune, September 29, 2011

"Special event: At 7 p.m. Friday, Ben Ford will speak on "Marking Our Place in the World," how humans use tattoos to mark meaning. Mr. Ford is assistant professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania specializing in maritime and historical archaeology and historic preservation. He holds degrees from the College of William and Mary, the University of Cincinnati, and Texas A&M University, where he earned his doctorate. He researches the maritime cultural landscape of Lake Ontario and Historic Hanna's Town in Greensburg.

—“'Tattoo Witness' exhibit collects fascinating photographs that erase the usual stereotypes,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, September 28, 2011

"Originally from Ebensburg, Bonni Bloom has come to the area as sponsor and coach of the Western Pennsylvania Interscholastic Equestrian Team. "I was definitely born into it," Bloom said. "My sister and I, our cousins, we were all born into it." Bloom's father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, were all into farming and it was something that Bloom herself always wanted to do. "It's funny, I have four brothers, and they all hate horses," Bloom said. "I love it though, but my parents were adamant that I get an education." Bloom followed the wishes of her parents. After graduating from Central Cambria High School, Bloom attended Indiana University of Pennsylvania and received a bachelor's degree in marketing.

—“Love of horses inspires Bloom's coaching career,”
Monessen Valley Independent, September 27, 2011

"During a welcoming reception in his honor Wednesday night at the Punxsutawney Country Club, Terry Appolonia, the new dean at IUP-Punxsutawney, used a much loved past-time - football - to describe the challenges and goals for himself and his staff at the West End campus. He read an Aug. 1, 1944, letter from E.L. "Curley" Lambeau, coach of the Green Bay Packers, to Ed McGroaraty, which also contained a one-page contract for him to play for the team.

—“Community formally welcomes new IUP-Punxsy dean,”
Punxsutawney Spirit, September 22, 2011

"HEATH -- Hopewell Federal Credit Union recently announced the promotions of six employees: Jarod Mallory, who joined HFCU in August 2010, has been promoted to lending and retail manager. Previously a lending manager, Mallory brings a wide range of experience in consumer and mortgage lending to his new position. He is a graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a bachelor's degree in business management.

—“Hopewell promotes six employees,”
Newark Advocate, September 18, 2011

"Take a ride north to hear "Strange Fruit: The Art of Paul Binai" at 6:30 p.m., a talk by Brenda Mitchell on the notable artist/curator's captivating expression and difficult subject matter. The lecture, and a "Fifty-Year Retrospective" exhibition of his work, are at The University Museum, Sutton Hall, Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Ms. Mitchell is a Ph.D. art historian and IUP associate professor of art history. The exhibition continues through Dec. 3. (724-357-2397).

—“2Do Calendar,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, September 18, 2011

"Not everyone is presented with the opportunity to do what they love on national television. On Thursday night, former Osbourn football standout Jerrell McFadden had that opportunity and made the most of it. McFadden is now a member of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) Crimson Hawks and on Thursday night they took on the No. 8 Bloomsburg Huskies. The match-up between these two Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC) rivals was selected as the Division II Game of the Week and broadcast nationally on CBS Sports Network.

—“Former OHS Star Shines on TV Debut,”
ManassasPatch, September 17, 2011

"Clearfield Chamber of Commerce welcomed a new executive director on Aug. 31. Holly Bloom, a 2007 graduate of Curwensville Area High School and 2011 graduate of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, has taken over the reins from former director, Amy Potter. Bloom has a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism and a minor in communications from IUP, and most recently worked as a part-time reporter for the Punxsutawney Spirit newspaper. While at IUP, Bloom was a member of Public Relations Students Society of America, an organization that teaches students planning and leadership skills, and traveled to Seattle for its National Assembly meeting.

—“Bloom named as new director,”
Clearfield Progress, September 17, 2011

"Hugh M. Reiley has been named the new interim chair of the Schuylkill County Democratic Party.Reiley replaces Christian P. Morrison, 41, mayor of Tamaqua, who resigned this month after only serving since June. The Schuylkill County Democratic Executive Committee appointed Reiley at its meeting Thursday, according to a press release from the party. Reiley is a Pottsville native and graduated from Pottsville Area High School and attended Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Mannes College of Music, New York, N.Y., according to a biography issued with the press release.

—“City native new interim chair of county Democratic Party,”
Republican Herald, September 17, 2011

"It's a good idea to let the child set the pace, rather than force the situation," says Laura Knight, who teaches child psychology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Generally, children can have mixed feelings when returning to the country of their birth. Some can feel an emotional attachment to the country as soon as they step off a plane. Others feel nothing at all. And that can all be tied to a child's maturity and their age when they left the country, Knight says.

—“Internationally adopted kids visit homelands to learn about heritage,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 16, 2011

Binai exhibit Artist Paul Binai surrounded by Kit Kat girls during the opening gala of his 50 year retrospective at IUP's Sutton Hall "I can't believe I did all this," said artist Paul Binai as he glanced around the gallery filled with half a century of his best work for "Paul Binai, Fifty-Year Retrospective." The show's opening gala, "Eine Kleine Kit Kat Klub: A Taste of Jazz Age Berlin," Saturday night at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's University Museum featured German food, music and a bevy of Kit Kat girls who added some sizzle to the schnitzel. But it was the powerful images that had guests talking. "This is very moving," observed Ron Anderson. The exhibit was put together by curators Bill Double (board president of the University Museum) and Donna Cashdollar (with Charles) along with input from Mr. Binai. Among those impressed by the body of work were Dean of the College of Fine Arts at IUP Michael Hood, gala chair Diana Lee Friedline, Laurie and Andy Kuzneski, Bruce Jenkins and Marja Roholl. The show runs through Dec. 3

—“Paul Binai, Fifty-Year Retrospective gala,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, September 13, 2011

The sky was blue and the temperature a pleasant 85 degrees, making Aug. 26 perfect for El and Bill Sugra's ninth annual golf tournament in memory of their son, Bill. The cloudless day was reminiscent of Sept, 11, 2001, when the Sugras lost Bill, then 30, in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. In the years since, the Bill Sugra Memorial Fund, which the golf outing supports, has donated more than $300,000 to the needy and disadvantaged and has kept Bill's generous spirit alive. It started somewhat by accident nearly 10 years ago when a seventh-grader at Bill's alma mater, St. Thomas More Elementary School, suggested the school donate the $75,000 raised in its annual walkathon to help cover medical bills for Bill, who hadn't been heard from after a hijacked plane hit the north tower, where he worked on the 103rd floor. But there would be no medical bills. So the Sugras used the money to start a memorial fund to honor the son who would pick up two cups of coffee or two lemonades on his way to work - one for himself and one for a homeless friend he passed in his six-block jaunt to work. For the first few anniversaries of Bill's death the Sugras attended memorials at ground zero, then Shanksville, then Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where he went to college.

—“"Out of grief, purpose",”
Allentown Morning Call, September 11, 2011

The American Society of Safety Engineers Foundation has announced the 2012 recipients of the America Responds Memorial Scholarship and the Harry Taback 9/11 Memorial Scholarship, both of which were established after the 9/11 terrorist attacks to honor those who died. The America Responds scholarship provides $1,000 each year to an undergraduate student pursuing a degree in occupational safety and health or a closely related field, and this year's recipient is Charles Frey, who is studying fire protection and safety technology at Oklahoma State University. The Taback scholarship's recipient is Shane Ferguson, who is studying safety sciences at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“"ASSEF Announces 2012 Recipients,",”
Occupational Health and Safety,, Sept. 11, 2012

Indiana is among area communities that will mark the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the United States with special programs and observances. Indiana University of Pennsylvania will play host to an anniversary remembrance program at 8:30 a.m. Sunday to reflect on the 2001 attacks. A tent will be set up in the Oak Grove with a display honoring the three IUP alumni lost in the fall of New York City's World Trade Center. A representative of the Interfaith Council will be in the tent to offer support for visitors. Music will be presented by a student violin quartet.

—“IUP, others, among sites for local 9/11 observances,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 9, 2011

UNIVERSITY MUSEUM: "Paul Binai: Fifty-Year Retrospective," an overview of the accomplished career of the Southwestern Pennsylvania artist and curator, is at John Sutton Hall, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Sept. 13-Dec. 3. (724-357-2397).

—“Fall Arts Preview / Art: Visual Delights,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, September 8, 2011

Folks around these parts like to point to Carnegie-MellonUniversity's Theatre Department and crow its many virtues when famous alumni are mentioned. Go to CMU and you're practically guaranteed a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. That's an exaggeration, but it should be true considering the tuition rates to attend CMU. Well, that most noble institution now has a bit of competition. Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) has unleashed its own star. She is Jennifer Lynn Warren, an Altoona native. She has a small part, but a crucial one, as she highlights the set up and opening scene for CREATURE, one of the few monster movies to actually feature a monster. Warren dominates the opening six minutes. Her performance includes a strip scene, full frontal nudity (no sign of John Cleese, Eric Idle or the rest of the Python group) and an attack by the monster which results in her gruesome demise. In one scene, she embodies the essence of good monster movies: She goes where she shouldn't and does silly stupid things, she provides eye candy, and then she dies much to the audience and make up department's delight. Brava! Those fans reading this, and you are legion, who may not be aware of the local college scenario, this is truly a momentous occasion. IUP is really not known for anything, save losing to California University of Pennsylvania (CAL) on a regular basis in every athletic event. Win-win! Hollywood has a new B-Schlock scream queen and IUP has a reason to point and yell "See!".

—“CREATURE creates carnage, confusion,”
Pittsburgh Film Industry Examiner, September 8, 2011

Ruth Hope turns 102 years old today. The first in her family to reach the centenarian mark, she has no idea how she got this far. "I've had a very nice life - exciting and fun." Presently a resident of Spring Arbor in Winchester, she was born in Newport, Pa. and attended Indiana University of Pennsylvania where she studied to be a teacher. This education led her to a career of teaching music and substituting."Teaching made me happy," she said. "I liked the kids."

—“Ruth Hope reaches 102,”
Winchester (Va.) Star, September 6, 2011

Other technology successes tied to Western Pennsylvania include: . Mark Cuban, 52, who grew up in Mt. Lebanon, owns the Dallas Mavericks and sold an Internet radio company to Yahoo! in 1999 for $5.7 billion. . Chad Hurley, 34, an Indiana University of Pennsylvania graduate, co-founded YouTube in 2005 and sold it to Google a year later for $1.65 billion.

—“Pittsburgh powered by high-technology success stories,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 6, 2011

One word describes tuition and fees at colleges and universities during the past decade: Up. A Tribune-Review analysis of tuition and required fees at more than 20 public and private nonprofit colleges and universities in Western Pennsylvania showed increases ranging from 52 percent to 116 percent during a 10-year period, when increases in median household income failed to keep pace with inflation and student debt soared. Those concerns resonate with Zack Stayman. A senior, he is president of the Student Government Association at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where tuition and fees increased nearly 9 percent this fall after lawmakers reduced state support for the 14 universities in the State System of Higher Education by 18 percent. Stayman said he will graduate debt-free. But for many classmates, Stayman said, increasing costs mean rising debt loads. "Literally everyone here worries about it. I know people who put off returning to school to avoid taking on more debt," Stayman said.

—“College students squeezed by rising fees, declining aid,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, September 4, 2011

After 25 years of directing The Ohio State University Marching Band, Jon Woods has announced his intention to retire at the end of the 2011-12 academic year, the university announced Saturday. President E. Gordon Gee announced Woods' decision during the band's pre-game skull session.Woods received his bachelor's degree from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, his master's degree from Penn State University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

—“Ohio State Marching Band Director Woods Announces Retirement,”
TV10, Columbus, Ohio,, September 3, 2011

In a stirring moment during today's Skull Session, Ohio State University President E. Gordon Gee announced the retirement of Dr. Jon Woods, Director of the Ohio State University Marching Band. Now entering his 28th season as director, and his 38th season with the band, Dr. Woods has one of the most storied careers in the long, proud history of the band. The OSUMB official page discusses his career in more detail, including this: A recipient of the School of Music Distinguished Teaching Award, Dr. Woods is recognized nationally as a clinician and adjudicator for both marching and concert band festivals. He received his Bachelors Degree from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, his Masters Degree from The Pennsylvania State University and his Ph.D. from The University of Michigan. Dr. Woods has received untold honors and accolades over his illustrious career as a band director and a music educator. In 2010 Dr. Woods topped them all when he was awarded one of the most prestigious honors in collegiate music - the College Band Directors Association Lifetime Achievement Award. Dr. Woods will surely be missed.

—“The Buckeye Battle Cry,”
Ohio State University, September 3, 2011

I would like to formally introduce myself as the new director of the Clearfield Chamber of Commerce. My name is Holly Bloom, and I am a native of Curwensville. I graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a bachelor's degree in journalism and a minor in communications.

—“The Chamber Chapter,”
Clearfield Progress, September 6, 2011

Laura Marshak, a licensed psychologist, professor of counseling at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and the author of several books,including "Married With Special Needs Children," which she co-authored with Fran Pollock Prezant, says that while divorce is a possibility for somecouples raising a child with special needs, that seems to be moreproblematic for some types of disabilities, such as autism spectrum disorders. "Down syndrome has appeared to be an exception," says Dr. Marshak, "and yes, there has been research that suggests these marriages aremore stable than many. While writing our book, my co-author and I learnedabout the marriages of hundreds of couples who had one or more children > withdisabilities.

—“Children with disabilities put strain on marriages,”
San Francisco Examiner, September 2, 2011

Jesse, now 4, was born in July of 2007. Shane and Wyatt arrived a year ago in March. Ten weeks early, the twins were diagnosed with Down syndrome soon after they were born. Through a rough pregnancy, a devastating diagnosis, and some very scary days when they didn't know if either or both of the boys were going to survive, Christo and Waksmunski have counted on one very special thing to get them through - each other. They are pretty sure their relationship will go the distance. The general assumption appears to be that marriages often fall apart after the birth of a child with a disability. This would appear to be a very real possibility, given the additional pressures couples face when raising a child with special needs. Dr. Laura Marshak, a licensed psychologist, professor of counseling at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and the author of several books, including "Married With Special Needs Children," which she co-authored with Fran Pollock Prezant, says that while divorce is a possibility for some couples raising a child with special needs, that seems to be more problematic for some types of disabilities, such as autism spectrum disorders. "Down syndrome has appeared to be an exception," says Dr. Marshak, "and yes, there has been research that suggests these marriages are more stable than many. While writing our book, my co-author and I learned about the marriages of hundreds of couples who had one or more children with disabilities.

—“Children with disabilities put strain on marriages,”
Lehighton Times News, August 20, 2011

Dennis Emert was elected president of the 5,000-member Pennsylvania Music Educators Association. In addition to working with music educators in Pennsylvania and across the country, Emert will work closely with state lawmakers as an advocate for music education. Education: Emert received a bachelor of science degree in 1985 from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He earned a master's degree in music education at the university in 1989.

—“Newsmaker: Dennis Emert,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 31, 2011

There's something about college life that appeals to Indiana University of Pennsylvania Northpointe Campus students Madalyn Bergad and Rachel Lassinger -- the relaxed, easygoing atmosphere, for sure. They were already enjoying some of that between classes in the student common area while preparing for their chemistry class on their first day of college on Monday.

—“Enrollment numbers up at IUP campus as classes get under way,”
Kittanning Leader-Times, August 30, 2011

VNA Health Care is expanding its primary health care services at 400 N. Highland Ave. in Aurora with seven new doctors and nurses. The new doctors are: Sarah McCollester, Naperville, obstetrician/gynecologist; Chastity Quinn, Woodridge, nurse practitioner in the obstetrics and gynecology department; Priscilla Sarmiento-Gupana, Aurora, pediatrician; Ashima Gupta, Oak Park, pediatrician; Mark Francom, Naperville, family nurse practitioner; Katherine Haslam, Naperville, family nurse practitioner; and Marco Barajas, Plainfield, pharmacist. McCollester received her medical degree from Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine. McCollester was the administrative chief in the residency program, responsible for scheduling at Harrisburg Hospital and Hershey Medical Center. During her residency, she received several awards. McCollester completed her undergraduate work at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, graduating summa cum laude with a bachelor's degree in biology and minors in theater and chemistry.

—“VNA Health Care announces new staff,”
Beacon-News, Chicago, Ill., August 29, 2011

In May 2010, a vocal ensemble of young adults -- mostly college age and from the Connellsville area -- was brought together by local music instructor Michelle Harbaugh. "I named the ensemble 'Canto Spianato,' which means smooth singing, because I was studying, as part of my master's program, about the acclaimed voice teacher Mathilde Marchesi and her vocal techniques. Marchesi uses the words canto spianato to not only refer to her style of teaching smooth singing but she also uses these words to describe good singing in general," Harbaugh said. The members include: . Lindsey Weimer is a CAHS graduate and graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a bachelor of science in music education. She is a music teacher (substitute) and director of the Connellsville Area All-Star Chorus. Harbaugh is a music teacher and choral director at Connellsville Junior High East. "I was encouraged by two of my mentors, James Dearing at IUP and Edgar Highberger at Seton Hill, to start a choral ensemble. I organized Canto Spianato when I began to talk to former students about it and saw that there is a local interest in continuing to sing choral music after high school and college graduation. The members of this group are not only great singers, they are great people."

—“'Canto Spianato' finds its voice,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 28, 2011

For the past 22 years, Colleen Ruefle has been a part of students' lives at La Roche College -- in good times and bad. As vice president for student life and dean of students, she oversees all student support services that are "outside the classroom," including athletics, health services and residence life. For those actions and her other work with students, Ms. Ruefle has received the Ronald Lunardini Distinguished Alumni Award for 2011, given by Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The award is given by the IUP Department of Student Affairs in Higher Education, the department in which Ms. Ruefle earned her master's degree in 1989. The honor is named for Ronald Lunardini, who worked at the university for more than 35 years, and is presented to an alumnus of the student affairs department whose achievements and experience best exemplify the standards and values of the department.

—“A newsmaker you should know: Honor goes to La Roche dean for doing job she loves,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, August 4, 2011

The first question just about everyone asks on hearing that Indiana University of Pennsylvania has torn down its old dormitories and replaced them with brand-new ones, is "How much did this cost the taxpayers?" And the quick answer you get from folks like Michelle Fryling, the university spokeswoman, and Tom Borellis, the administrator who managed the project, is "next to nothing." The university has, indeed, scraped off 11 dormitories that dated from the 1950s and '60s and replaced them -- at a cost of $244 million in just the last five years -- with a beautifully arrayed collection of eight new dorms. In fact, the university has created a whole new southern end to its campus with sophisticated modern buildings, courtyards and quadrangles that would make any college proud. IUP calls its project its "Residential Revival" and believes it is the largest such student housing-replacement project of its kind in the country.

—“IUP ditches 'dungeon' dorms amid a 'Residential Revival',”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 21, 2011

Quilting, for many, evokes a mental picture of older women in rocking chairs making lap blankets and speaking fondly of grandchildren. Somerset native Aimee McNaul, 19, uses the hobby to connect with family and friends, and as an artistic outlet. The sophomore at Indiana University of Pennsylvania has been quilting since ninth grade, finding time for the craft despite varsity turns on the Somerset Area High School swim team and volleyball team.

—“Somerset teen uses hobby to build relationships,”
Somerset Daily American, August 20, 2011

Enrollment is down this year at three universities in the 14-school Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education where tuition and fees increased about 9 percent this fall following reductions in state subsidies. While projections for all system schools were unavailable Thursday, at least one school is projecting increases in enrollment. Indiana University of Pennsylvania officials believe this fall's enrollment will exceed last year's 15,126 record enrollment, said school spokeswoman Michelle Fryling.

—“Enrollment falls at three state universities,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 17, 2011

A trio of lifeguards from a local pool won a regional competition demonstrating their lifesaving preparedness skills.Dylan and Logan Mudlo and Jillian Blodgett, all of Kittanning, were one of three teams representing the Belmont Complex and placed first out of 12 teams at the Butler County Lifeguard Competition at Alameda Pool in Butler, PA on Saturday, July 30th. Lifeguard Dylan Mudlo, 22, last attended the competition three years ago, where his team finished second. He said it is a true team victory. "It definitely was a team effort and everyone pulled their weight equally. We had to work together," Dylan said. "Everyone did their job." A lifeguard for five years, Dylan is also a distance swimmer with the Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) Crimson Hawks' men's swimming team at the main campus in Indiana, Pa. A senior Exercise Science major, Dylan hopes to go to graduate school to major in Sports Medicine. He begins his senior classes August 29.

—“Kittanning Lifeguards Win Regional Competition,”
The Kittanning Paper, August 17, 2011

Rutgers University product Adam Goldberg scored four goals and added an assist to lead Jerusalem Lacrosse Club past Tel Aviv Lacrosse Club, 12-11, in front of a standing room only crowd at Kraft Stadium in Jerusalem on Saturday night. Goldberg, who earned game MVP honors, joined team captain Mathew Markman in raising the Zimmerman Cup, commemorating Jerusalem's victory in the first ever lacrosse match on Israeli soil. The trophy will be awarded to Israel's national champions for years to come. Derek Lief (Haverford College) and Alex Kost (McGill University) added three goals each, while Jason Lurie (Eilat, Israel) scored twice. Ben Levine (Indiana University of Pennsylvania) played the entire game in goal to earn the win.

—“J'lem edges TA as lacrosse makes Israeli debut,”
Jerusalem Post, August 17, 2011

Erie's Joseph Mushalansky won three events at the NPC Georgia Bodybuilding-Figure-Bikini Championships July 16 in Atlanta. Mushalansky, a 2005 Cathedral Prep graduate, finished first in two junior middleweight events and one junior overall event. Mushalansky graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in May 2010 with a bachelor's degree in physical education and sport.

—“Erie native becomes some body,”
Erie Times-News, August 15, 2011

The University of North Dakota is one step closer to retiring its nickname and mascot, but changing the school's 90-year-old Native American moniker -- the Fighting Sioux -- has not been without complications. In 2005, the NCAA sought to end the controversy surrounding Native American mascots once and for all by ordering nearly 20 schools whose nicknames and mascots they deemed "abusive in terms of race, ethnicity or national origin" to either get Native American permission to use their name and likeness, or to come up with a new one. The resulting actions among the targeted schools were varied. The Arkansas State Indians became the Red Wolves; the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Indians became the Crimson Hawks.

—“North Dakota, NCAA spar over mascot,”
CNN, August 14, 2011

Seven members of The Post-Journal staff won awards in the New York State Press Association statewide writing competition. Andrew Carr, Mike Frank, Christopher Kinsler, Dennis Phillips, Matt Spielman and John Whittaker were awarded first place in spot news reporting for their combined coverage of the July 24, 2010, tornado that touched down in Mayville and Randolph. Carr, a Warren native, is a 2009 graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He has been at The Post-Journal since May 2010 and currently serves as the police and courts reporter.

—“Associated Press Honors Seven Post-Journal Reporters,”
The Post-Journal, Jamestown, N.Y., August 13, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania has been named one of "America's Top Colleges" by Forbes magazine for the second consecutive year. IUP is one of only 23 Pennsylvania colleges and universities chosen for Forbes' fourth annual listing. The list includes 650 of the 6,600 accredited postsecondary institutions in the United States. Magazine editors chose colleges and universities for the listing based on the quality of teaching, graduation rates, career prospects and low levels of debt for graduates. The institutions are ranked with information culled from a variety of sources. Those sources include surveys on the Rate My Professor website, freshman-to-sophomore year retention rates, alumni surveys, alumni inclusion in "Who's Who in America" and the Forbes corporate officer list. Also considered are national awards won by an institution's students. IUP students have won 10 Fulbright scholarships, five Goldwater awards and 17 international study-abroad awards from the Freeman-Asia and Gilman foundations in the past decade. IUP was also recently named, for the 17th consecutive year, as one of the nation's top doctoral universities by U.S. News & World Report.

—“The university also marked its 11th consecutive year of inclusion in the Princeton Review's "Best Colleges" guidebook,”
WPXI-TV (Pittsburgh, Pa.), NBC affiliate, August 10, 2011

For the second straight year, Indiana University of Pennsylvania has been designated one of America's Top Colleges by Forbes Magazine. IUP is one of only 23 schools in Pennsylvania chosen for the magazine's fourth annual list. The designation is based on a school's quality of teaching, graduation rates, career prospects and national awards won by students. The university was also recently recognized as a top doctoral university by U.S. News and World Report.

—“IUP again named one of 'America's Top Colleges' by Forbes,”
WJAC-TV (Johnstown-Altoona, NBC affiliate), August 9, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania has been named one of "America's Top Colleges" by Forbes magazine for the second consecutive year. IUP is one of only 23 Pennsylvania colleges and universities chosen for Forbes' fourth annual listing. The list includes 650 of the 6,600 accredited postsecondary institutions in the United States. Magazine editors chose colleges and universities for the listing based on the quality of teaching, graduation rates, career prospects and low levels of debt for graduates.

—“IUP again named one of 'America's Top Colleges' by Forbes,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 9, 2011

Karen Bell, a spokeswoman for the State System of Higher Education, which includes California and 13 other universities, said mandatory health insurance "is not a system issue." Indiana and Slippery Rock universities, two other schools in the state system, charge health center fees. At Indiana, that's $160 a semester; at Slippery Rock, $137 a semester. Neither school has a general requirement that students carry health insurance.

—“California U's health insurance mandate too expensive, student claims,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 8, 2011

Mitchel Halmi, a 2007 graduate of McDowell High School, spent part of his senior year in college in Shanghai, China. Halmi is a double major in Asian studies and international business at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and expects to graduate this fall. He spent his time in China studying at Shanghai Normal University.

—“College Clan,”
Erie Times-News, August 7, 2011

Not many chefs in Northeast Pennsylvania have the privilege of saying they worked directly under a world-famous chef, or were employed by the Coors family (as in, proprietors of the beer company). But chef Zach Dollak, co-owner of Milano Italian Steakhouse in Old Forge, has those credits on his resumé. Upon graduation from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a degree in culinary arts and hotel/restaurant management, Mr. Dollak set his sights high. He got his start at The Breakers in Palm Beach, Fla., which he said was the original five-star restaurant in the United States, where his biggest feat was completing a two-day catering event that served 10,000 people. The food prep was so intense, the kitchen actually used conveyor belts to serve dishes. Afterward, Chef Emeril Lagasse himself insisted on meeting the chef who had pulled off the meals without a hitch, and gave Mr. Dollak his card, promising him a job in one of his restaurants if he ever decided to move to New Orleans. Eventually, Mr. Dollak took a leap of faith. Honoring his vow, Chef Lagasse hired him, and Mr. Dollak worked as executive sous chef at NOLA Restaurant for two-and-a-half years.

—“Chef's Table: Milano Italian Steakhouse in Old Forge,”
Scranton Times-Tribune, August 4, 2011

If you Google "texting in class," you can dive into a debate that has vexed college professors for a decade: What to do about students who pay more attention to text messages than to the instructor? Although there are few college-wide policies, many professors explicitly forbid texting in class. Some even list grade-reduction penalties for violators. But last year, Teresa Shellenbarger, a nursing and allied health professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, decided to try something different. "I just got tired of fighting them. I figured if I can't beat them, why not join them? Why not use cell phone technology in class?" she said. "I use texting to poll the class. I post a question for them to see and they text their answers that I post on a PowerPoint for the class to see. And sometimes when we're working on a controversial topic where students don't really want to own a response, I have them phone a friend and get an anonymous opinion to post," Shellenbarger said.

—“Professor incorporates use of cell phones as classroom tool,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 30, 2011

Keith Dils, interim associate dean of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania School of Education, said he would be concerned about kids' attention span. "I would be interested in studies on intellectual stamina. When do they start to run out of energy? When does it start to be inefficient?" Dils said.

—“District officials considering four-day school weeks,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 25, 2011

North Dakota political leaders are asking the NCAA to back off and let the state's flagship university keep its Fighting Sioux name and logo, even at the risk of potential blacklisting and scorn by other universities and its own conference. Bob Davies, who helped lead a nickname transition as an administrator at Indiana University-Pennsylvania, said officials considered suing the NCAA or living with sanctions rather than surrendering its Indians nickname. "We didn't see any long-term value in that, to be honest," Davies said. IUP teams are now the Crimson Hawks. Davies and Potts said neither school's booster donations suffered.

—“North Dakota fights alone to keep Sioux nickname,”
Associated Press, July 24, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania will cut 52 positions as part of its effort to make up a $7.5 million shortfall for this fiscal year, spokesman Michelle Fryling said today. Ms. Fryling said 10 managers and non-faculty employees -- five full-time and five part-time -- will be furloughed as part of the effort. The university will lose an additional 42 positions through attrition, meaning it will not fill positions when employees resign or retire and will leave other vacancies unfilled. The university also slashed about $2 million through cutting operating expenses across the institution's divisions.

—“IUP to cut 52 positions,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 14, 2011

The FBI is working with Indiana University of Pennsylvania to offer a graduate-level degree in anti-terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review says, at first, the FBI will send agents from its own ranks to complete the 30-credit Master of Science in Strategic Studies in Weapons of Mass Destruction. Eventually, however, the university hopes to offer the course to students from other law enforcement agencies.

—“FBI to offer anti-terror degree at IUP,”
Chambersburg Public Opinion, July 12, 2011

The FBI has established a graduate program at a Pennsylvania university for its agents to study counterterrorism and weapons of mass destruction, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reported on Tuesday (see GSN, Feb. 17). The multiple year program at Indiana University of Pennsylvania is currently only open to FBI personnel. Other departments ultimately might be able to have students study for the master of science in strategic studies in weapons of mass destruction.

—“FBI Establishes Graduate Degree in WMD Studies,”
Global Security Newswire, July 13, 2011

Characters, stories and impressions have always been a part of Mr. Krenn's act. His imitations of his teachers at North Catholic High School won him a standing ovation and the talent show during his senior year. At Community College of Allegheny County, he won another talent show, and by the time he graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1983, he had about 20 minutes of material. "I thought, 'Wouldn't it be neat to make a living at this?' " he says.

—“Comedian Jim Krenn and wife Hedy's lives have gone to the cats and dogs,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 13, 2011

One of 14 state-owned universities has developed a graduate-level degree in anti-terrorism and weapons of mass destruction in conjunction with the FBI, aimed at educating law enforcement agents. For now, the FBI plans to send agents from its own ranks to complete the master of science in strategic studies in weapons of mass destruction at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, about 45 miles northeast of Pittsburgh. Eventually, however, the university hopes to offer the course to other agencies. "It's not going to be open enrollment (or) traditional students," IUP criminologist Dennis Giever told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, which reported the new degree Tuesday. "You worry about whether you might be teaching the wrong person this stuff." The agency first approached IUP about creating a graduate program in 2008, said Doug Purdue, chief of the Countermeasures and Preparedness section of the FBI's Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate in Washington. "We went to several different universities," but none had programs focusing on protecting the nation from weapons of mass destruction like IUP's program does, Purdue said. The credit course includes material on radiological, or "dirty" bombs; attacks on electric power grids; and biological attacks on food and water.

—“IUP Offers Anti-Terror Degree,”
Erie Times-News, July 13, 2011

The FBI is working with Indiana University of Pennsylvania to offer a graduate-level degree in anti-terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. At first, the FBI will send agents from its own ranks to complete the 30-credit Master of Science in Strategic Studies in Weapons of Mass Destruction, according to Channel 11's news exchange partners at TribLIVE. Eventually, however, the university hopes to offer the course to students from other law enforcement agencies. Students in the program won't pay traditional tuition. Instead, the FBI and other agencies will pay roughly $300,000 a year for groups of 15 to 20 students to complete the multi-year degree. The school has worked with the FBI to develop a special criminology program that 34 agents have already completed. The State System of Higher Education late last month approved offering a degree for that course work.

—“FBI Offers Anti-Terror Degree At IUP,”
WPXI-TV (Pittsburgh), July 12, 2011

One of 14 state-owned universities has developed a graduate-level degree in anti-terrorism and weapons of mass destruction in conjunction with the FBI, aimed at educating law enforcement agents. For now, the FBI plans to send agents from its own ranks to complete the master of science in strategic studies in weapons of mass destruction at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, about 45 miles northeast of Pittsburgh. Eventually, however, the university hopes to offer the course to other agencies.

—“FBI to offer anti-terrorism, weapons of mass destruction degree at Indiana U. of Pa.,”
The Republic (Columbus, Ind.,), July 12, 2011

Don't look for the new graduate degree at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in any school catalog. Clearance from the FBI is a prerequisite. With help from government threat analysts and federal law enforcement, IUP criminologist Dennis Giever created the Master of Science in Strategic Studies in Weapons of Mass Destruction. The 30-credit, multi-year course focuses on worst-case scenarios: radiological "dirty" bombs, power grid disruptions, crippling biological attacks on food and water supplies.

—“FBI, IUP partner to create anti-terror degree program,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 12, 2011

"The Heinz Endowments of Pittsburgh awarded Indiana University of Pennsylvania a grant for the third consecutive year for continued support of IUP's Promise Plus initiative. With this most recent grant of $150,000, IUP has received $460,000 total from the Heinz Endowments for this program. Promise Plus - now in its third year - aims to expand on the Pittsburgh Promise, which is designed to help all students in Pittsburgh Public Schools plan, prepare and pay for education beyond high school at an accredited post-secondary institution within Pennsylvania."

—“Promise Plus Initiative to Benefit from Third Heinz Endowments Grant,”
Pittsburgh Regional Alliance Post, July 5, 2011

Tony Atwater, 59, has been a frequent visitor to campus since he was appointed president in April. His first official week begins today, but he was in the office last week because he was "ready to go."

—“New NSU president has energy, experience - and a vision,”
The Virginian-Pilot, July 5, 2011

Washington native Dr. Donald Lee recently retired as superintendent from Shaler Area School District after 14 years in the top post. During his tenure, Lee's "Vision for the Future" project that ran from 2005-2008, included the renovation of two buildings, the addition of full-day kindergarten and the infusion of new technology. He joined Shaler in 1997 after holding the superintendent's post at Trinity School District for three years. Earlier, he was superintendent at South Allegheny School District. Lee earned bachelor's and master's degrees from California University of Pennsylvania and a doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh. He also received a master's degree in industrial and labor relations from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1991 while superintendent of South Allegheny School District. He began his career as a sixth-grade teacher in the North Hills School District, where he later became a principal, later working as a principal in the Seneca Valley School District.

—“Notebook,”
Washington Observer-Reporter, July 11, 2011

For almost three decades, the Altoona Community Theatre has offered workshops for local children to learn more about acting and theatre. The first of this summer's sessions started last week with children in grades kindergarten through second grade learning the ins and outs of performing. The week ended with performance (about 15 minutes) for family and friends at the Mishler Theatre. "When they're younger, we introduce them to being in a play," Julie Settle, an instructor for the workshops said. Settle participated in the workshops when she was a child, and she went on to earn a bachelor of arts in theatre from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and she continues to act and direct plays locally. Though not every child pursues acting as an adult, it's a good introduction to theatre, Settle said.

—“Theater camps let children take the stage,”
Altoona Mirror, July 4, 2011

And a 2010 survey by the AARP discovered that about one third of those 50 and older who use such sites "friend" their grandchildren.The organization expects social-networking seniors -- particularly those who are disabled or bed-ridden -- to also contribute to surging use of real-time video technologies, such as Skype. "The world has become so small. It's a necessity kind of thing for (seniors)," says Mary Beth Leidman, a professor of communications media at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. "You've got computers operating grocery stores and everywhere else now. They're either forced into learning how to use a computer or they're left behind." Leidman and other experts say texting, though hot with grandchildren, is probably least-liked by among those over 55. It requires a certain manual dexterity some seniors may not have.

—“Senior citizens join the social-media throng,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 4, 2011

Bachelor's in psychology, Lebanon Valley College; master's degree in educational psychology and education specialist certificate in school psychology, Indiana University of Pennsylvania; working on a doctorate in school psychology, Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Work experience: I am employed in my fourth year as a school psychologist at Muhlenberg School District. Prior to working at Muhlenberg, I was a school psychology intern at Derry Township School District in Hershey.

—“Christina Marco-Fies, school psychologist,”
Reading Eagle, July 4, 2011

Deadly force is intended to be used only when police officers fear for their lives or the lives of others. That was clearly the case last winter, prosecutors say, when officer Donna Lesher fatally shot 67-year-old Eugene Ellison in his apartment after he charged at her with a walking cane at the end of a struggle. "I think there are many things that you could have done to avoid that situation," said R. Paul McCauley, a professor emeritus and former chairman of the department of criminology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. "If you take that moment of that shoot, I can see the prosecutor saying a man had a club raised over his head within two or three feet of the officer, then it was justified. Of course. "In terms of policy, I ask the tactical question: What the hell are you doing standing five feet in front of the guy with a club?" he said.

—“In wake, scrutiny and lessons,”
Arkansas Democrat, July 3, 2011

These former police officers and law enforcement academics contributed their insight for the story on the use of deadly force on the night of Dec. 9. R. Paul McCauley is a professor emeritus and former chairman of the department of criminology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania CQ. McCauley previously served on the faculties of the school of justice administration, National Crime Prevention Institute, and the Southern Police Institute at the University of Louisville. He now works as a criminal justice consultant reviewing instances of police use of force.

—“Who We Talked To For the Ellison Case,”
Arkansas Democrat, July 3, 2011

The board approved a new master of science in integrated scientific applications degree program at Millersville University. It includes studies in environmental systems management and climate science. The other new programs are a master of science in strategic studies in weapons of mass destruction degree to be offered at Indiana University; and a bachelor of arts in jurisprudence degree at California University.

—“New programs at state schools,”
Allentown Morning Call, July 3, 2011

Nearly 120,000 students attend the 14 universities that make the state system. It will now be up to those individual campuses to make cuts or increase fees to balance their budgets. "We're still doing calculations about exactly what this will mean," said Michelle Fryling, spokeswoman for Indiana University of Pennsylvania. "We are relieved that our students are not shouldering the entire bulk of the gap."

—“State colleges hiking tuition,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 1, 2011

IUP has one of the oldest safety programs in the country. We actually got our start in the 1970s, right after OSHA was passed. There was some NIOSH seed money given to help establish some safety degree programs, and IUP was lucky enough to get some of that seed money, and that's how the program got its start. . . .Managing Editor Ronnie Rittenberry discussed online education, growth prospects, and more with program directors at two of the nation's largest university-based safety degree programs – Dr. Lon Ferguson at Indiana University of Pennsylvania ...

—“O&A: The Future of the Profession,”
Occupational Health and Safety, July 1, 2011

Striving to "do the right thing" can help safety professionals create sustainable safety programs that also have a positive impact on a company's economic health. Indiana University of Pennsylvania Safety Sciences professor Jan Wachter, Ph.D., stressed that safety professionals must go beyond regulatory compliance and consider ethics in order to build successful safety programs that also boost the bottom line. While laws and regulations inform individuals what they cannot do, ethics instruct individuals and organizations as to what they should do, Wachter said.

—“Doing the Right Thing: Linking Safety, Ethics and Economic Prosperity,”
EHS Today, June 29, 2011

Robert Heasley, a sociology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and the president of the American Male Studies' Association, said weddings were one of the last institutions to hold on to strict roles for the sexes, but that they were changing. "We continue to have the marriage ceremony, but we're slowly changing it to represent the greater balance of the genders," he said. "It's a significant shift to have the male be the flower girl because it introduces a male who represents gentility, flowers and femininity. It's just another step toward the dismantling of the patriarchal formation of the marriage."

—“As Wedding Roles Evolve, Here Come the Flower Men,”
New York Times, June 24, 2011

Rob James has a vivid memory of the first Clarks show, which turned out to be an impromptu gig at their college, Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Of course, The Clarks would move on from beer-soaked frat basements to become one of Pittsburgh's most beloved bands. On Saturday, the Clarks celebrate their 25th anniversary with a show at Stage AE.

—“The Clarks keep rolling 25 years later,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, June 23, 2011

It seems like only yesterday, the Clarks were fresh-faced kids playing the bars at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. In the blink of an eye, a quarter-century passes. Time brings changes, and circumstances change. From the Fayette County Fair to "Late Night with David Letterman." From living together in a crowded house in Highland Park to becoming men with wives and families. From their label, King Mouse, to dalliances with majors and indies, and back again. From songs fueled by the angst of youth to music that is reflective, soulful.

—“The Clarks' silver anniversary shows their strength, support,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 23, 2011

Kelsey Bretz, of Ridley Park, was selected for membership in Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society. The organization is open to freshman students who achieve a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher. IUP’s Phi Eta Sigma chapter members participate in a number of projects annually, ranging from blood drives for the American Red Cross to volunteer service with the IUP Allegheny Arboretum project. Bretz, a computer science major, is the daughter of Mark and Gwen Bretz, and is a 2010 graduate of Ridley High School. A dean's list student, she is also a member of the Information Assurance Club.

—“Widener Student Wins Accounting Award,”
Delaware County Daily Times, June 19, 2011

Three local students were selected for membership in Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society. The students are Conrad F. Kubaney, Mary Ann Hedlund and Michelle Hedlund, all of Erie. Kubaney, a nursing major, is the son of Karla Razanauskas and Charles Kubaney and a 2010 graduate of Mercyhurst Preparatory School. Kubaney is also a member of the IUP varsity swim team. Mary Ann Hedlund and Michelle Hedlund, both early childhood and special education majors, are the daughters of Daniel and Karen Hedlund and are 2010 graduates of McDowell High School.

—“College Clan,”
Erie Times-News, June 20, 2011

On June 28 the month’s recital series will conclude with a performance of classics by Dennis R. Bell on the restored 3,000-pipe Skinner organ in the sanctuary. Dennis Bell, a native of Crabtree and resident of South Greensburg, is the director of music at St. Paul Roman Catholic Church in Butler. He holds degrees in sacred music and music education from Seton Hill University, where he studied with Edgar Highberger. He also studied with Joan Lippincott at the Westminster Choir College, Princeton, N.J.; Ann Labounsky at Duquesne University; and Dr. Christine Clewell at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where he is enrolled in the master of music program.

—“Next at First Lutheran: Adia Dobbins, Dennis Bell,”
Somerset Daily American, June 19, 2011

Carel Fish was diagnosed with cancer 22 years ago. Terra Shanholtz heard her own similar diagnosis less than a year ago. Both were fighting back on Saturday, the second day of the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life in Chambersburg. They rallied friends to raise money to find a cure for cancer. ‘I’m in remission from Hodgkin’s lymphoma,’ said Shanholtz, who is studying at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania to be a teacher. ‘We rounded up a team of family and friends. We’re trying to raise as much money as we can. Her cancer battle interrupted her studies for the year. She went to the doctor when she noticed a lump under her arm, she said. She had never been sick. The diagnosis in July shocked her. Shanholtz organized the team Hakuna Motata (meaning 'no worries’) for the relay. Shakyra Miley said she was motivated to join the team by her relationship with Shanholtz and her experience with a cancer survivor in her own family.

—“Relay for Life Walkers ‘Fighting Back’,”
Chambersburg Public Opinion, June 19, 2011

Two centuries after a naval arms race introduced more and more warships to the Great Lakes, the search is on for the sunken remains of two of the ships that fought in the War of 1812. Researchers are digging the depths of Lake Ontario for the remains of a frigate called the Mohawk and an unnamed U.S. gunboat designed for amphibious attacks and harassing British shipping. ‘Quite a few ships have been excavated around the Great Lakes in the U.S. and Canada from the War of 1812, but there are many that haven’t been found,’ underwater archaeologist Ben Ford said. There is good reason to believe these ships lie in sediment near each other, making them excellent targets for a summer excavation, Ford told OurAmazingPlanet. ...Ford and his colleague Katie Farnsworth, both from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, are surveying Black River Bay, in the northeast corner of Lake Ontario, to find the two shipwrecks.

—“Researchers Go Diving for 1812 Shipwrecks,”
OurAmazingPlantet.com/Mother Nature Network, June 17, 2011

The Clarks are celebrating their 25th anniversary on June 25 with a special one-time concert at Stage AE on Pittsburgh's North Shore. The Dicks (as they're affectionately known) formed as the duo of Blasey and James, playing the college bars and fraternities of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and moved on to Pittsburgh where Hertweck joined them on percussion. The Dicks created their own identity, separate from The Clarks, with fun and loosely structured shows in the clubs of Southwestern Pennsylvania, including a weekly Wednesday residency at much lamented Nick's Fat City. "When the band started at IUP in 1986, I never had designs on this being my career. Blasey graduated from Connellsville Area High School in 1982 and then spent five years in college at IUP. "I wanted to make it six, but my dad said 'that's enough, let's get going here.' I wasn't the best student, I was more interested in playing music, but I did understand the value of getting that degree."

—“The Clarks to celebrate 25 years,”
Connelsville Daily Courier, June 16, 2011

GREENSBURG - Geibel Catholic Middle-High School in Connellsville has a new principal, according to a release Tuesday from the Greensburg Diocese. In an administrative restructuring of the Diocese of Greensburg's two diocesan Catholic high schools, Donald M. Favero, principal of Greensburg Central Catholic High School the past four years, has been named principal of Geibel Catholic Middle-High School, Connellsville, and Denise Myers, assistant principal of Greensburg Central Catholic since 2006, has been named principal of GCC. Favero has more than 40 years of experience as an administrator, teacher and coach. He has a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Notre Dame, a master's degree from the University of Pittsburgh, secondary principal's certificate from Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP), and he has done postgraduate work at Youngstown State University in Ohio. Myers, a Greensburg resident, has served in a variety of capacities at GCC since 2001, including business teacher and head of the department. She has a bachelor's degree in business education from IUP, a master's degree in education from St. Bonaventure University, Olean, N.Y., and Pennsylvania certifications for secondary and elementary principal and supervision and curriculum development.

—“Greensburg Diocese announces administrative changes at its two high schools,”
Herald-Standard, June 15, 2011

Derry Borough Mayor Susan Bortz 62, a retired FBI agent who not only is the borough's mayor, but is also chief executive officer of the Derry Area Revitalization Corp. and runs the Derry Station Art Center in town. She earned her degree in art education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, but after a short stint as an art teacher in Tidewater, Va. decided to live and work in Washington D.C.

—“Derry Borough mayor a woman who can't say 'no',”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 15, 2011

I'm a Pittsburgh native, proud to call the The Lone Star State my new home. I come to London Broadcasting's Texas News Network from Charlottesville, Virginia where I worked as an anchor/reporter for the Charlottesville Newsplex (WCAV, WVAW, WAHU). Each week, I was also responsible for a feature called Jennifer's Heroes. These human interest stories put some of the community's unsung heroes in the spotlight. Prior to working in Virginia, I worked as a reporter for the FOX and ABC affiliate in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. While in college at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) I completed an internship with WPXI in Pittsburgh. That is where I obtained an exclusive interview with Oprah. I studied Communications Media and Journalism at IUP. I also anchored for my college news station, attended several conventions with the National Broadcasting Society and was a member of IUP's dance team, Dance Explosion.

—“Jennifer Black -- Capitol Reporter,”
KYTX-TV, Tyler, Texas, June 15, 2011

Julie Cash of Mentor received a best poster award for students from the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics during the sixth annual Undergraduate Scholars Forum at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The event is designed to recognize and stimulate undergraduate research and encourage all IUP students to collaborate with their peers, professors and other professionals within the university.

—“Campus News,”
The News-Herald (Ohio), June 14, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania faculty members Joann Migyanka, DEd, Susan Glor-Scheib, PhD, and Jeff Fratangeli, PhD, have written and produced the first in a series of training modules designed for first responders assisting people with autism in emergency and crisis situations. The project was supported by an external award of $27,000 from the Pennsylvania Department of Health. "The way that you communicate or approach a person with autism has to be significantly different than from traditional styles," said Dr. Migyanka, assistant professor in the Department of Special Education and Clinical Services. "Persons with autism tend to be very sensitive to sensory stimuli and often have difficulty understanding directions and commands, so it is important that emergency responders communicate with them in a different way than protocols usually dictate."

—“On Campus: Indiana University of Pennsylvania Produces Training Modules About Autism for EMTs,”
Advance for Speech-Language Pathologists & Audiologists, June 14, 2011

The state Education Department last week proposed revamping its teacher evaluation system in a way similar to Pittsburgh's -- a state-approved alternative implemented two years ago on a pilot basis and last fall across the district. Keith Dils, associate dean of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania College of Education and Educational Technology, who evaluates student teachers in the program, said simple pointers can help teachers improve the way they deliver lessons, which translates to better student learning. "Competency is one thing, knowledge is one thing, but actually performing it and having students benefit is another," he said. "Especially new teachers -- it's a blur, trying to keep track of everything going on in the classroom. Anything that gives structure can be of help."

—“State looks to echo city's teacher evaluation system,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 14, 2011

Zines are personal, local and tactile, and they were out in force at the inaugural Scranton Zinefest on Saturday. Unlike blogs that can be posted and distributed to the world, or conventionally published periodicals directed to the masses, zines - short for magazines - are meant to be candid and offer a distinct perspective. Zinester Laura Raysdale, a 19-year-old from Doyles-town, has been zining since January. Her zines often include Web addresses and additional material. She uses the Internet to swap and trade zines and doesn't begrudge zinesters who scan and post their zines on the Internet. "This is about having something to share and wanting it to reach someone," said Ms. Raysdale, a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. "For all the good material on the Internet, I still like the tactile sensation of having something in your hand."

—“'Zinesters' hit downtown Scranton,”
Scranton Times-Tribune, June 12, 2011

Four local students were selected for membership in Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society. The organization is open to freshmen students who achieve a grade point average of 3.5 or higher. IUP's Phi Eta Sigma chapter members participate in a number of projects annually, ranging from blood drives for the American Red Cross to volunteer service with the IUP Allegheny Arboretum project.

—“Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society finds a new member,”
The Voorhees Sun, May 12, 2011

The renaming was the idea of U.S. Rep. Mark Critz, an Indiana University of Pennsylvania graduate, who was surprised to discover that a post office had not been named for Stewart. "I thought, 'Boy, here's someone we want to make sure that his legacy continues,'" said Critz, D-Johnstown. Critz gained support for the measure from fellow Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Altoona; U.S. Sen. Bob Casey and former Sen. Arlen Specter.

—“Post office stamped with Jimmy Stewart's name,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 11, 2011

Manuel Torres has been named director, emergency and retail clinic services at Jefferson Regional Medical Center, the Jefferson Hills hospital has announced. In addition to overseeing operation of the hospital's emergency department, he is responsible for directing Jefferson's retail medical care initiative at two Walmart clinics, West Mifflin and Belle Vernon. Previously, Torres was director of clinical operations at STAT MedEvac, a division of the Oakland-based Center for Emergency Medicine of Western Pennsylvania, where he also served as clinical manager, base site manager and staff flight nurse. He has held several emergency nurse positions at Pittsburgh area hospitals, including Jefferson Regional and also served as a special forces medical sergeant in the U.S. Army. Torres earned an MS degree in nursing administration at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a BS in nursing from Duquesne University and an associate degree in nursing at Community College of Allegheny County.

—“Jefferson Names Manuel Torres Director,”
Pittsburgh Business Times, June 6, 2011

Residence: Spring Township; Family: Husband, the Rev. William Miller; three children and three grandchildren. Grew up in: Norvelt, Westmoreland County; Education: Mount Pleasant Area High School, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Millersville University and Alvernia University; Work experience: Music teacher in Massachusetts, 1977-81; sixth-grade teacher and ninth-grade reading teacher at Southern Middle School; reading specialist at 12th and Marion Elementary; and principal at 13th and Union Elementary.

—“In Our Schools: Dorothea H. Miller, principal, 13th and Union Elementary,”
Reading Eagle, June 6, 2011

Raymond G. Edwards Jr., Wernersville, received recognition by the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Council of Trustees for his work as student trustee. Edwards was appointed a trustee in 2009 by Gov. Ed Rendell. His tenure ended this spring with his graduation. He majored in economics and international business.

—“Campus Notes,”
Reading Eagle, June 5, 2011

The College of Health and Human Services of Indiana University of Pennsylvania conferred a degree, doctor of philosophy in criminology, to Pittsburgh native Melanie Beth Pallone. Ms. Pallone, of Oakmont, is a previous graduate of the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and has accepted a position as an assistant professor of criminal justice with the State University of New York in the department of sociology, anthropology, social work and criminal justice.

—“Dateline Pittsburgh,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, June 5, 2011

East Carolina University professor Sylvia A. Escott-Stump began her one-year term Wednesday as the 2011-12 president of the American Dietetic Association. She has served as president-elect since June 2010. Escott-Stump is a past president of the Pennsylvania Dietetic Association and a former treasurer of the North Carolina Dietetic Association. She has a degree in nutrition from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she also earned a master's degree in adult/community education and received the Distinguished Alumni Award. Her honors include ADA's Medallion Award, the North Carolina Dietetic Association's Member of the Year and Pennsylvania's Outstanding Dietitian. She also received ADA's first Margene Wagstaff Fellowship for Innovation in Dietetics Education and gave ADA's Lenna Frances Cooper Award Lecture in 2008.

—“ECU Notes: Prof leads Dietetic Association,”
Reflector.com (Greenville, N.C.), June 5, 2011

Rod Martin was no more than 5 years old when he peered into the universe and became starstruck. It was the beginning of a hobby that would eventually become a career and a lifelong passion. For the past 27 years, Martin has been director of the William M. Brish Planetarium in Hagerstown. And as the space program took off in the late 1950s, he said, "we used to look for satellites crossing the sky, specifically Echo. I began learning about the planets and really enjoyed looking at meteor showers." Martin said he began teaching in March of 1972 at Fountain Rock Elementary School and, in 1975, earned his master's degree in science for elementary teachers from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Several years later, he became a science teacher at Smithsburg Middle School, where the curriculum included astronomy. He also started an astronomy club.

—“Rod Martin is entering a new frontier,”
Herald-Mail (Hagerstown, Md.), June 3, 2011

Fantasizing about embarrassing or getting even with the boss, like the characters in these productions, is natural, says Dr. David LaPorte, psychology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. "Everyone does it," he says. "It's a normal human activity." Such fantasies are not exclusive to bosses and employees; they can transpire in just about any relationship, particularly those in which at least one person feels oppressed, abused or powerless, LaPorte says. Acting on the impulse is crossing the line. Remember what happened to Bud Fox at the end of "Wall Street" when he tried to get back at Gordon Gekko? "It's probably more therapeutic to talk these kinds of situations out, but, short of that taking place ... people fantasize because it makes them feel wanted or important," LaPorte says. "In the end, that's all most people, especially those who feel that paranoid, really want."

—“Bad bosses spur revenge fantasies in life, fiction,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 3, 2011

The National Society of Accountants Scholarship Foundation, Alexandria, announced the recipients of its college scholarships: Joshua D. Anderson, of Florida State University - Tallahassee, received $2,000; Nikita L. Bactee, of Lewis University, received $500; Rebecca K. Bailey, of Niagara University, received $750; Lindsey J. Borgens, of Central Washington University, received $1,000; Ross W. Bukouricz, of Carroll University, received $1,000; Rachel A. Fisher, of Penn State University, received $1,000; Jacqueline G. Friscia, of Penn State University, received $500; Katelyn N. Goettl, of the University of Wisconsin, received $1,000; Sonya M. Gooding, of Walla Walla University, received $1,000; Emily M. Heinz, of Olivet Nazarene University, received $1,000; Erika L. Kelley, of Gonzaga University, received $1,000; Benjamin J. Kincaid, of Pensacola Christian College, received $500; Katelyn M. Krissinger, of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, received $1,000.

—“Firm News,”
Accounting Today for the WebCPA, June 2, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania students will begin collecting samples today from the Beaver Run Reservoir to determine whether Marcellus shale deep-well drilling has affected the drinking water supply. The Municipal Authority of Westmoreland County will pay IUP $55,000 this year to provide testing and analysis of the water to address concerns from customers that chemicals from existing gas wells around the 5,000-acre property could have infiltrated the water supply.

—“IUP students to test Beaver Run Reservoir for drilling problems,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, June 1, 2011

Spring-Ford's new superintendent, David Goodin, shared his vision for the school district at a "meet and greet" event attended by about four dozen community members last week. The school board earlier this month approved hiring Goodin for four years, at a starting salary of $165,000. He will officially begin his duties on July 5, replacing Marsha Hurda, who is retiring. Goodin has served as superintendent in the Connellsville Area School District, near Pittsburgh, since December 2008. In biographical remarks he provided at the event in the Upper Providence Elementary School gymnasium, Goodin described the Connellsville district as having a high level of "generational poverty," which he said "presents its own sets of challenges." His previous professional experience includes stints in other districts in Indiana and Bedford County. Along the way, Goodin earned a master's degree in history and a doctoral degree from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Superintendent talks about himself, his goals,”
Pottstown Mercury, May 31, 2011

“Gain With Less Pain: Surviving the Arts,” a conference for arts managers, teachers, school administrators, artists and arts advocates, will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday at the performing arts center at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The conference is presented by the Pennsylvania Rural Arts Alliance and IUP’s ArtsPath and Lively Arts. The conference will include workshops and discussions that will focus on some of the issues, challenges and opportunities in the arts today. The goal of the conference is to help those working in the arts to be more productive with greater efficiency, especially when faced with shrinking resources.

—“Conference will focus on ‘Surviving the Arts’,”
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, May 31, 2011

"They are calling us the generation without hope," Kari Randall said as she shopped her resumé around at a job fair for recent college graduates at Temple University last week. "I agree with that." Randall graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2008 with a degree in journalism. "For the first time in American history, we have nowhere to go," she said. Randall and her classmates are not only competing against this May's graduates for jobs but also against more seasoned unemployed workers willing to take jobs with less pay and less scope to stay in the labor market. Randall and the others are just starting out, but they face lasting consequences. Companies, Koc said, set aside entry-level slots for that year's college graduates. Randall worked for two years at a small-town newspaper while she was in college but has yet to land a permanent job in her field.

—“Hiring up for new graduates, but recent classes may never catch up,”
Philadelphia Inquirer, May 30, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania: Chantel T. Cumberbatch, of Upper Darby, has been selected for the Freshman Talent Scholarship for the 2011-12 academic year at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The daughter of Carver and Kathyann Cumberbatch, she will graduate this year from Upper Darby High School.

—“Aston woman earns scholarship,”
Delaware County Daily Times, May 29, 2011

The reactions ranged from startled to silly. Was Gov. Tom Corbett serious when he said in April that state college campuses situated over the Marcellus shale could be opened to natural gas drilling? Environmentalists conjured images of dirty, dangerous drill rigs sprawling across campus quadrangles. In newspaper website comment fields, readers asked, "Is he joking?" An upstate legislator has already crafted a bill that would allow campus drilling. Preliminary talks with school officials have begun. And there is a model to work from: Oil and gas wells are nothing new on campuses and other public spaces out West. Natural gas wells drilled in 2009 are generating millions in royalties for the University of Texas in Arlington. Multistory oil derricks sit just outside the front door of the state Capitol in Oklahoma City. Even Indiana University of Pennsylvania once powered its campus with natural gas from four wells.

—“Out West, campus gas wells proposed in Pa. not new,”
Erie Times News (Associated Press, May 29, 2011

During his fellowship, he will expand his composition skills by studying with internationally known composer Edward Gregson, who is retired from the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, England, and Jack Stamp, wind ensemble director and composer at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Arts & Community: UNT arts institute names faculty fellows for 2011-12,”
Denton (Texas) Record-Chronicle, May 29, 2011

A former Altoona police detective sergeant will take on the job of Blair Township police chief. Roger A. White, 54, who worked for 24 years for Altoona and currently heads the police department at St. Francis University in Loretto, was named Friday to succeed Chief Randall Lingenfelter, who retired in March. In 2005, White became executive director of the Criminal Justice Training Center at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where he coordinated research and curriculum development as well as worked with law enforcement training sites. He took the job at St. Francis in May 2010.

—“Experienced local officer chosen to be police chief,”
Altoona Mirror, May 28, 2011

Newsmaker: David Stein Age: 57; Residence: Indiana; Family: Wife, Karen, 58; daughters, Suzan, 26, and Elizabeth, 22; Occupation: Professor and director of Indiana University of Pennsylvania's Speech-Language Pathology program. Education: Bachelor's degree in education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and graduate degrees from Kent State University in Ohio and the University of Pittsburgh; Background: A faculty member at IUP since 1992, Stein has been an active member of the Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association for 34 years, serving as president, past president and an executive board member and committeeman. As president, he oversaw implementation of changes in how the state Department of Education certifies speech-language pathologists. He served on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's Legislative Council. Noteworthy: Stein received the distinction Honors of the Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the highest award presented by the group. Quote: "It's really wonderful to have your professional colleagues in the state acknowledge your work in this way."

—“Newsmaker: David Stein,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 23, 2011

The violent tornado that ravaged Joplin, Mo., killing at least 117, had hospital employees rushing to transport patients to safety at the last few minutes and forced others into refrigerators for shelter. There was 20 minutes of advance warning provided by the emergency sirens, so why did some appear to be caught off-guard? While Hollywood's portrayals of humans warned of impending natural disasters tend to show chaos and panic, scientists say that in real life, people tend to express disbelief instead. "Research generally shows that folks are in denial that a tornado is going to harm them," said William Donner, an environmental sociologist at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in Indiana, Pa. "Generally people don't panic unless the threat is right at their doorstep."

—“Do people fail to respond to tornado warnings?,”
Chicago Tribune, May 26, 2011

After a long cold winter, you want a place where you can stretch out your legs out and get back into shape. For Western Pennsylvanians, there are many area tracks to choose from but the best tracks are on college campuses. The good thing about Pennsylvania's state universities for the general public is that there facilities can be used free of charge. Miller Stadium is located on Indiana University of Pennsylvania's campus next to the Memorial Field House and Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex. Miller Stadium, which is used by IUP's football and track and field teams, is generally available around the clock and is open to the general public. The quarter-mile oval track is an eight-lane track that will allow to get a solid workout in whether you run, jog or briskly walk around the track. The best thing about using Miller stadium to workout is if you wanted to do more than running or walking on a track you can use Memorial Field Houses weight room (when open). The Field House weight room has machine and free weight, stationary bikes, treadmills and elliptical available to use. In addition, after your workout is done you can shower in the Field House or next door in Zink Hall.

—“Miller Stadium, Indiana University of Pennsylvania,”
Yahoo.com, May 26, 2011

The violent tornado that ravaged Joplin, Mo., killing at least 117, had hospital employees rushing to transport patients to safety at the last few minutes and forced others into refrigerators for shelter. There was 20 minutes of advance warning provided by the emergency sirens, so why did some appear to be caught off-guard? While Hollywood's portrayals of humans warned of impending natural disasters tend to show chaos and panic, scientists say that in real life, people tend to express disbelief instead. "Research generally shows that folks are in denial that a tornado is going to harm them," said William Donner, an environmental sociologist at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in Indiana, Penn. "Generally people don't panic unless the threat is right at their doorstep."

—“Do people fail to respond to tornado warnings?,”
Los Angeles (Calif.) Times, May 24, 2011

Margaret Fromm, a daughter of Eric Fromm, of Bellefonte, has been inducted into the Mortar Board National College Senior Honor Society at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Mortar Board membership is open to college juniors who demonstrate excellence in scholarship, student leadership and community service at their institutions. Participants continue as active Mortar Board members during their senior year. Fromm, a 2008 Bellefonte Area High School graduate, is a communications major, academic excellence award recipient and dean's list student at IUP. She is the public relations officer of IUP's Veterans Organization and a member of IUP-TV. In 2008, IUP's Mortar Board chapter raised more than $3,100 for the Indiana County Head Start literacy program in partnership with the Indiana Starbucks.

—“Community Achievers,”
Centre Daily Times, May 24, 2011

The Red Lion Area School District has a new assistant superintendent, Winnifred G. Younkin, effective no later than July 20, according to a district news release. She will be replacing LeeAnn Zeroth, who resigned earlier this year. Younkin holds a Bachelor of Science in Management from Cedar Crest College, earned her Masters of Education from DeSales University and her Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She brings nearly 20 years of experience in classroom instruction and district administration to the district. She has been serving as Director of Elementary Education at Donegal School District since 2010, and previously served as Donegal School District's Assistant Director of Curriculum and Instruction since 2008.

—“Red Lion schools names new administrator,”
York (Pa.) Daily Record and York Sunday News, May 23, 2011

Jessica Berry of Williamsport, a 2009 Tech High graduate, is in her second year of a two-year Academy of Culinary Arts program at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She was chosen for the Advanced Baking and Pastry class, a program that accepts only 30 students per year. Berry said her Tech High experience gave her a solid foundation for the basics, and an internship at Saint James School was valuable experience. After graduation from IUP on May 6, she was to begin a 450-hour paid externship at the posh Nemacolin Woodlands Resort in Western Pennsylvania. "I'm excited and nervous at the same time. I'm hoping to stay there a couple of years to build up experience for my resume," Berry said of working at the five-star, fine-dining restaurant.

—“Local culinary education leads student down a delectable path,”
Herald-Mail, May 23, 2011

Norvelt will be holding a Memorial Day program at 9:30 a.m. Monday in front of the Roosevelt Hall Honor Roll. The guest speaker will be Gene Calabrase, a Mt. Pleasant native, who served as 1st Lieutenant in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. Calabrase served with the Pennsylvania National Guard from 1949 to 1951. He attended the Infantry Leadership School in Ft. Riley, Kansas and graduated from Armored Officers Candidate School in 1952. He then served in the 31st Infantry Division, the 2nd Infantry Division and the 72nd Tank Brigade in 1953. He served in the final winter, spring and summer campaigns of the Korean War. He returned home shortly after the Korean War cease fire to begin college. He is a 1958 graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Duquesne University where he received a Master's degree in 1964.

—“Memorial Day programs dedicated in honor of the area veterans,”
Connellsville Daily Courier/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 21, 2011

After 31 seasons and over 400 coaching victories, Jana Klezek figured that enough was enough. Klezek's resignation as the long-time coach of the Central Cambria girls basketball program was accepted at a meeting of the Central Cambria School Board earlier this month. She will also step down from her position as assistant softball coach, effective at the end of this season. Klezek, 51, a 1977 Central Cambria and 1980 Indiana University of Pennsylvania graduate, will continue in her teaching position as a health and wellness instructor at Central Cambria.

—“CC's Klezek resigns her post,”
Altoona Mirror, May 22, 2011

Six Cleveland police officers, all accused in recent months of using excessive force, have scuffled with at least 39 suspects since February 2009. But, based on reports completed by the officers and reviewed by The Plain Dealer under the state's public-records law, few posed an imminent danger to the men and women in blue. Paul McCauley, a former police officer and criminology professor emeritus at Indiana University of Pennsylvania who has testified on similar issues, said such charges suggest officers had no legal reason to detain the suspect. "How can you resist arrest if there wasn't a reason for you to be arrested?" he said.

—“6 Cleveland police officers accused of brutality have used force on 39 suspects since 2009,”
Cleveland (Ohio) Plain Dealer, May 22, 2011

Tyler Bridge got added advice from his attorney when finalizing the deal on owning a pizza shop. "We had the paperwork done, but when my lawyer asked me about a name, I said we didn't have one," Bridge says. "So he suggested we use the word for my last name in Italian. And I think it's perfect." Ponte means bridge in Italian, so Ponte's Pizza became the name when Bridge, 26, and his girlfriend, Jordan Carr, 21, opened the doors to the Mt. Lebanon restaurant a month ago. Bridge says he always wanted to have his own business. He says he understands what it takes to be successful with a restaurant, because of his combined experience working in pizza shops and his job as an assistant general manager at First Watch Cafe in Robinson and Cranberry. He also has a degree in hospitality management from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Pair bring personal touch to Ponte's Pizza,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 19, 2011

Only 90 minutes of exposure to Web sites promoting anorexia or bulimia can affect caloric intake of college-age women, U.S. researchers say. Dr. David LaPorte of Indiana University of Pennsylvania says the study involved 90 university students screened to ensure they had a normal body mass index and no history of eating disorders. All of the participants were asked to keep food diaries.

—“Health News: Eating disorder Web sits = eating less,”
United Press International, May 18, 2011

Study co-authors John Lewis, a faculty member at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's department of criminology, and Mike Arter, a graduate of IUP's criminology doctoral program, say with the older U.S. population growing exponentially -- the U.S. Census Bureau shows there are 48.6 million citizens age 60 and older in 2006, compared to 35.6 million of 60-plus citizens in 1980 -- the study is an important one for the baby boom generation. One of the factors that can affect the quality of life for the elderly is the perception and fear of crime among the elderly population, Lewis says. "The fear of crime among the elderly has been the focus of numerous studies over the past several decades," Lewis says in a statement. "Unfortunately, there is little consensus among researchers and a wide swing in findings from one decade to another. Basically, earlier studies reported fear of crime among the elderly as a significant problem or concern of the elderly, but more recent research indicates the elderly are no more afraid of crime than any other age group." The findings are published in the Law Enforcement Executive Forum.

—“Health News: Report: Elderly less fearful of crime,”
United Press Internatoinal, May 18, 2011

Background/schooling: Bachelor's degree, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pa.; master's in music education, Indiana University, Bloomington; graduate of U.S. Army Command and General Staff College; school administrator licenses, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. Why did you become a teacher: I was fortunate to have many excellent teachers, one of whom is mymother, who shared the love of their discipline andart of teaching. Every one of them played an important role in showing me how enjoyable andrewarding it is to help students develop their talents to the best of their abilities.

—“Wayne Shipe,”
Indianapolis Star (Indianapolis, Ind.), May 19, 2011

The Spring-Ford Area School District in Montgomery County will have a new superintendent starting July 5, School Board President Joseph P. Ciresi said Wednesday. David Goodin, superintendent of the Connellsville Area School District in Fayette County, Pa., was hired at the board meeting Monday after a nationwide search, Ciresi said. Goodin will replace Marsha Hurda, who is retiring after 32 years as an educator, five of them as superintendent. During her tenure, five Spring-Ford buildings were equipped with geothermal energy, test scores improved, and the Royersford-area district's leadership was cited for excellence, said Ciresi, who called the transition "bittersweet." Goodin, who earned a doctorate in education last year from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, will be asked to manage growth and position Spring-Ford among the leading districts in the region, Ciresi said.

—“Spring-Ford hires superintendent from Connellsville,”
Philadelphia Inquirier, May 19, 2011

Just ask the campers who will attend the Electro-Optics Summer Camp at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Northpointe Campus in South Buffalo what they're doing this summer and they'll all tell you the same thing: "We're going to Inventionland." The science and technology-minded campers will visit Davison's Inventionland in the RIDC Park along Route 28 in O'Hara as part of their experience at this year's camp, IUP officials said. "Davison's Inventionland has been recognized as one of the most creative facilities in the world," said Kelley Nuttall, outreach and career coordinator for the 2+2+2 workforce leadership program in electro-optics at the IUP Northpointe campus. "The 70,000-square-foot world is where teams of designers, engineers, builders, graphic artists, writers, producers, editors, directors and animators create and produce the ideas of the future."

—“IUP science and technology campers to visit Inventionland,”
Valley News Dispatch, May 18, 2011

U.S. jails are being called the "new asylums" because they are filled with mentally ill men and women, two criminologists say. Indiana University of Pennsylvania criminology Professor Dr. Rosemary Gido and Dr. Lanette Dalley, an IUP criminology alumna now at the University of Denver, say mentally ill women are largely incarcerated because of de-institutionalization and the "war on drugs." Mentally ill women outnumber mentally ill male offenders in jails and prisons and they are likely to have a history of co-occurring disorders and trauma, the researchers say. The criminologists are co-authors of the book "Women's Mental Health Issues Across the Criminal Justice System," which focuses on suicide, trauma and deficiencies in jail intake, assessment and treatment.

—“Experts: Jails, prisons the 'new asylums',”
United Press International (UPI.com), May 18, 2011

An area student received an award for work presented at the sixth annual Undergraduate Scholars Forum at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. The event is designed to recognize and stimulate undergraduate research and encourage all IUP students to collaborate with their peers, professors and other professionals within the university. Sarah Zambotti, Terrace Avenue, Ford City, received an Outstanding Presentation Award. Zambotti, a natural sciences-pre-optometry major, is the daughter of Leslie and Lori Zambotti. She is a 2009 graduate of Ford City High School. She is a member of the American Medical Student Association, the Biology Club and the IUP Ambassadors student-alumni group She works as a supplemental instruction leader and tutor.

Alycia L. King, of Kittanning, has been selected for Emily A. Fabiny Memorial Scholarship for the 2011-2012 academic year at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. King, daughter of Kenneth and Margherita King, is a journalism and criminology pre-law major with minors in theater, piano and communications media at IUP. She is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists, Indiana Players and sings in the IUP Chorale and Chorus. The Emily A. Fabiny Memorial Scholarship was established by Amanda J. Fabiny in 2005 in honor of her daughter Emily, an IUP graduate who died in a car accident in 2002.

—“Student Notes,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 16, 2011

The Spring-Ford Area School Board voted 8-0 Monday night to hire a new superintendent. David R. Goodin, 48, was hired for four years at a starting salary of $165,000. His contract runs from July 5 to June 30, 2015. He will replace current Superintendent Marsha R. Hurda, who is retiring at the end of the current school year. Goodin is superintendent in the Connellsville Area School District, about 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh.Goodin received a bachelor's degree in secondary education from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a master's in history from Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania and doctoral degree in education, administration and leadership from IUP.

—“Spring-Ford hires new school superintendent,”
Pottstown Mercury, May 16, 2011

A criminologist at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania has found that elder adults are not afraid of crime as it was reported to be in previous studies. John Lewis, a faculty member in IUP's Department of Criminology and his partner Mike Arter, a 2005 graduate of IUP's criminology doctoral program, made the new conclusion. While earlier studies reported that fear of crime among the elderly is a significant problem and concern, Lewis found that the elderly are no more afraid of crime than any other age group.

—“Senior citizens are not afraid of crime,”
Asian News International/Daily India.com, May 15, 2011

The sisters, Just ask the campers who will attend the Electro-Optics Summer Camp at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Northpointe Campus what they're doing this summer and they'll all tell you the same thing: "We're going to Inventionland."The science and technology-minded campers will visit Davison's Inventionland in the RIDC Park along Route 28 in O'Hara as part of their experience at this year's camp, IUP officials said. The invention factory, Inventionland, turns out more than 2,000 inventions each year.

—“IUP campers to visit Inventionland,”
Kittanning Leader-Times, May 14, 2011

The sisters, Jennifer, 8, and Brooklynn Mayhle, 5, wore pink ribbons in their hair, spring dresses and white shoes.The daughters of slain Pittsburgh police Officer Stephen Mayhle were dressed in their best as they heard their father extolled as a hero on Friday during a Peace Officers Memorial Service in Indiana. Mayhle died April 4, 2009, along with Officers Paul Sciullo and Eric Kelly, while answering a domestic disturbance call in Stanton Heights. Mayhle, originally from White, Indiana County, graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Peace officers remember fallen,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 14, 2011

The mystery of at least one person dressing as a ninja in Fayette County has been solved. Pennsylvania State Police Cpl. Charles Frey Jr., who is in charge of the crime unit investigating 11 vehicle break-ins and a near-stabbing in Fayette County on April 24, admitted on Friday to dressing like a ninja in a YouTube parody of the case. Law enforcement agencies nationwide are grappling with issues regarding employees' use of social media, said R. Paul McCauley, a professor emeritus in criminology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, who frequently testifies as an expert witness in court cases on police matters. "You have a whole bunch of issues here, including freedom of expression, and the whole ethics regarding it being in law enforcement," McCauley said. "It could have serious implications on careers and the specific criminal investigation in which the particular officer is involved, depending on what is posted for the public view," he said. "I'd have to say most departments don't have any policy on it. But some of the information posted could definitely come back and bite an officer in the butt," McCauley said. "It may be a spoof, but still," he said. "I would recommend not getting involved in that stuff if you're in law enforcement." "Pennsylvania state trooper admits spoofing ninja criminal,"

—“Pennsylvania state trooper admits spoofing ninja criminal,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, May 14, 2011

Wesley Shipley will be the next superintendent of the Shaler Area School District. Mr. Shipley earned his doctorate in educational leadership at Duquesne University. His master's degree in educational leadership is from Youngstown State University in Ohio. He received his bachelor's degree in elementary education from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. "Shaler Area picks superintendent,"

—“Shaler Area Superintendent,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 12, 2011

When Debbie Shearer graduated from Fox Chapel Area High School in 1979, she took more than just her diploma with her. She also was chosen as the Best Female Athlete at Fox Chapel for 1979. After high school, Shearer moved on to Indiana University of Pennsylvania and majored in health and physical education. She also lettered in basketball all four years along with earning a letter in softball in her freshman and sophomore years. She was captain of the basketball team in her senior year. "We had some good teams at IUP," Shearer said. "I made the switch from a point guard in high school to a shooting guard in college." She obviously retained her point guard mentality, though. She still is in the IUP record books for assists in a game with 14, which puts her second all-time. Shearer got a chance to put on the sneakers again at IUP a few years ago. "There was an alumni game and I played," Shearer said. "I realized how quickly time flies when I found out that some of the players in the game weren't even born when I was playing in college." Shearer lives in O'Hara and has worked for Nestle-Purina for 23 years. "Shearer: Fox Chapel Area's best female athlete in 1979,"

—“Best Female Athlete in 1979,”
Fox Chapel Herald/Tribune-Review, May 13, 2011

Katherine L. Farnsworth, assistant professor in the department of geoscience at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania and 1993 graduate of DePauw University, is the co-recipient of a $14,888 grant from the National Geographic Society in support of a research project. Dr. Farnsworth and Ben Ford, a professor in IUP's anthropology department, are preparing for a June survey of the Black River Bay, in the northeast corner of Lake Ontario, to find and identify two shipwrecks from the War of 1812. "Prof. Katie Farnsworth '93 Receives Grant to Study 19th Century Shipwrecks,"

—“Grant to Study 19th Century Shipwrecks,”
DePauw University News, May 13, 2011

Researchers at Indiana University of Pennsylvania have announced plans to find and identify two shipwrecks from the War of 1812 in Lake Ontario. Geoscientist Katie Farnsworth and anthropologist Ben Ford are preparing for a June survey of the Black River Bay in the northeast corner of Lake Ontario for a frigate called the Mohawk, a product of a naval arms race between the Americans and the British, and an unnamed gunboat designed for amphibious attacks and harassing British shipping, a university release said Thursday. Ford said he has data suggesting the gunboat's location and reason to believe the Mohawk is within a few miles of it. The Great Lakes were a crucial battle arena for the United States and Great Britain during the War of 1812, with each side racing to try to build a superior fleet of military vessels. The shipwrecks will be buried, or at least partly buried, in sediment entering the lake from the surrounding watershed for two centuries, Farnsworth said. The search will utilize side-scanning sonar, sub-bottom chirp profiling, magnetometry and archaeological diver inspections, the university release said. "Searchers to look for War of 1812 ships,"

—“Searchers to look for War of 1812 ships,”
United Press International, May 12, 2011

"Catalyst," a collaboration of artwork from 11 Indiana University of Pennsylvania graduate students, will be on display from Saturday through June 6 at Art Works in Johnstown! 413 Third Ave. in the Cambria City section of Johnstown. The exhibition will showcase a variety of mediums ranging from paintings and sculptures to ceramics and wood furniture. An opening reception will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday. The reception and exhibit are free. "Artists' collaboration at Art Works,"

—“Catalyst,”
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, May 11, 2011

Jason Espino, a graduate student in applied archaeology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, is doing his master's thesis on gas drilling's impact on more than 3,000 designated historic sites in Washington County. "People think archaeology is Egypt and Mexico, but we have archaeological richness here, and it's being destroyed by unchecked drilling for natural gas," said Mr. Espino, who is also president of the Allegheny County Chapter of the Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology. "We do not want to stop development, but we also do not want to destroy the past. A healthy balance is what is proper here." Mr. Espino said conventional gas-well drilling already has damaged the Heathville Flats site in Jefferson County and the Runaway Run and Fishbasket Forks sites in Armstrong County. "It's shocking to see," he said. "This is a great example of unnecessary destruction of a significant site." "State's laws offer little shale drilling protection to archaeological sites,"

—“Protection to Archaeological Sites,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 8, 2011

Don and Tammy Slusser wouldn't be together if it weren't for running. They met at Indiana University of Pennsylvania's homecoming in 1983; she was a runner for the school and he was a visiting graduate. "Our first date was a 9-mile run," says Don, 59. Tammy, 46, hasn't run every marathon but has been there every year -- and won twice, in 1994 and 2000. She first ran the race in 1989. Three years earlier, on an 89-degree day, Don proposed to her at the finish line. "Twelve runners have toed the line in all 21 Pittsburgh Marathons: Sole Survivors,"

—“Sole Survivors,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 9, 2011

The reactions ranged from startled to silly. Was Gov. Corbett serious when he said Thursday that Pennsylvania college campuses situated over the Marcellus Shale could be opened to natural gas drilling? At Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where four gas wells powered the campus in the late 1970s and into the '80s, spokeswoman Michelle Fryling said, "We are certainly appreciative of the governor's comments about how the universities need to think outside the box on ways to generate new revenues." But before any final decisions are made, Fryling said, "we would need to study it very carefully." "Out West, campus gas wells not new,"

—“Out West, campus gas wells not new,”
Philadelphia Inquirer, May 1, 2011

Maps have become a thing of the past, replaced by modern GPS systems in our cars and now, even our cell phones. Yet, they continue to inspire many in countless ways. For painter Chuck Olson, they are the basis of his latest body of work, currently on display in the solo exhibit "Color" at Christine Frechard Gallery in Squirrel Hill. A native of Shaler, Olson, 58, lives in Indiana, Pa., where he has maintained a studio since 1975, when he was working on his masters of fine arts degree at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Chuck Olson's 'Color' exhibit leads viewers to new vantage,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Reveiw, May 4, 2011

Chartiers-Houston senior Tanya Timko has twice faced the challenge of being a girl playing on the boys' tennis team. The first time was her sophomore year, when she and her older sister, Karli, won the WPIAL Class AA doubles championship, the first ever pair to do so. The second time around, her senior year, she finished third in the WPIAL Class AA boys' tennis tournament and earned a berth in the state tournament, which takes place in May. Timko will move on to play tennis at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she says she fell in love with the program and the campus. She looks forward to competing for a national championship at the NCAA Division II level. "I love the team, I love the coach, I love the area," she said. "It's going to be perfect."

—“Student-Athlete of the Week,”
WTAE-TV (Pittsburgh, Pa.), April 28, 2011

Who was Chief Cornplanter? Despite the revolutionary contributions of this prominent Seneca war chief, few Americans are familiar with his colonial influence. William Betts, Jr. hopes this will change with his new book, In The Hatchet and the Plow. Cornplanter’s life is revealed in a candid biography focusing on the chief’s influence during the American Revolution. Following Cornplanter’s journey as a chief on wilderness rivers and as a warrior for the British, Betts studies his turbulent relationships with iconic leaders of two worlds, delving into Indian-white relations. Now retired, William Betts, Jr. was a professor of English at Indiana University of Pennsylvania for nearly 40 years. A World War II veteran of the U.S. Navy, Betts holds a bachelor’s degree in English and German from Dickinson College in Pennsylvania, and completed his graduate work at the University of Minnesota and The Pennsylvania State University, earning both a master’s degree and doctorate in English and comparative literature.

—“Legendary Chief Cornplanter is Revealed,”
Digital Journal, April 28, 2011

James Pace has come a long way from the streets of Brockton. Now with his master’s degree in hand from Bridgewater State University’s criminal justice program, there’s no telling what’s next for this ambitious young man. Eventually, he’d like to become mayor of Brockton. In the fall, the 24-year old will pursue his doctoral degree in criminology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Recently, we sat down for a chat.

—“From Brockton to Doctorate,”
Enterprise News (Brockton, MA), April 27, 2011

Most high school varsity teams would feel fortunate to rally around one senior player recruited to play at the college level. The Seneca Valley High School girls lacrosse team has four. Senior defender Brenna Gallager is heading to Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she liked not only the campus and sports facilities, but the academic programs.

—“Colleges Recruit Four Seneca Valley Girls Lacrosse Players,”
Cranberry Patch.com, April 25, 2011

INDIANA, Pa. — Three students from Waynesboro completed requirements for graduation from Indiana University of Pennsylvania as of December 2010. They are: Jessica McKinstry and Scott A. Ziegler, bachelor’s degrees in music education; and Anna Plucinski, bachelor’s degree in the honors program in psychology.

—“Academic News,”
Shippensburg Public Opinion, April 24, 2011

Northern York County Regional Police have hired a new probationary officer, according to a news release issued Wednesday. Candace N. Campbell, 29, of Dubois began an intense 12-week field training program with the department this week. After completing the training, she will be assigned to patrol division. Campbell is a 2000 graduate of Dubois Area High School and a 2004 graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a bachelor’s degree in criminology. Campbell began her law enforcement career with Florida's Orange County Sheriff’s Office in 2006.

—“Northern Regional Police Hire Probation Officer,”
York Daily Record, April 21, 2011

Nicole M. Hewitt, Chambersburg, completed requirements for a doctorate in administration and leadership studies, nonprofit and public sectors, at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She is self-employed as an educator, trainer and researcher in the field of human services. She is an instructor and advisory board member for Family Development Credential Program of Franklin, Fulton and Adams counties, an ally in the Circles out of Poverty program in Franklin County and a youth Sunday school teacher. Married to Robert L. Hewitt, she is the daughter of John and Theresa Monastra. Hewitt's doctoral dissertation was titled ‘Using Empowering Processes to Create Empowered Outcomes through the Family Development Credential Program: An Empirical Study of Change in Human Service Workers.’ At IUP, she earned a 4.0 grade point average and was the lead author of the article ‘The Family Development Credential Program: Synthesis of Outcome Research on an Empowerment-Based Human Service Program,’ published in the March 2010 Families in Society Journal.

—“Hewitt of Chambersburg Completes Doctorate Work,”
Chambersburg Public Opinion, April 21, 2011

Barbara K. Zuchelli, dean and chief operating officer for the Pennsylvania campuses of Allegany College of Maryland, completed a doctor of education degree at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Zuchelli, who joined the college in 1991 as its first Pennsylvania staff member, examined ACM’s Early College program, with which she been closely involved over the years, as the subject of her doctoral dissertation.

—“ACM’s Dean of Pennsylvania Campuses Completes Doctorate at IUP,”
Somerset Daily American, April 21, 2011

Education Realty Trust Inc. (NYSE:EDR), one of the nation’s largest developers, owners and managers of collegiate housing, recently received three of the inaugural INNOVATOR Awards at the 2011 Interface Conference sponsored by Student Housing Business magazine. EDR won for Best Public/Private Partnership Development, Most Creative On-Campus Public/Private Financing and shared Best On-Campus Bandwidth/Connectivity Solution with its partner, Pavlov Media. The Best Public/Private Partnership Development INNOVATOR Award was given to EDR for its ‘Residential Revival’ at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP). For this project — which is the single-largest, privatized, student housing replacement program in the nation — EDR systematically created 3,516 beds to replace housing at the university without losing bed count. Through this successful public/private partnership, 1.15 million square feet of suite-style accommodations in eight new living-learning and mixed-use buildings replaced 11 obsolete, outmoded dormitories during the four-phase project. EDR oversaw the entire process through design, financing and construction. The new residences have been credited with greatly increasing applications and admissions. Enrollment at IUP is at an all-time high with an increase of more than 1,000 students — from 14,081 in 2005 to 15,086 in 2010. ‘This nationally recognized project brings distinction to this university and complements our efforts to recruit and retain excellent students through our living-learning programs, all designed to ensure academic success,’ said Dr. David Werner, interim president.

—“Education Realty Trust Wins Three INNOVATOR Awards at Student Housing Business’ Interface Conference,”
Traders Huddle.com April 20, 2011

Amplifi Commerce, an international e-commerce consultancy to major retail clients, announced today it has named Keith Krzeminski chief operating officer and executive vice president with oversight of the company’s operations, client delivery and business units. He brings more than 25 years of operational and financial experience to the company, including leading efforts at software, information technology, manufacturing and public companies. Prior to joining Amplifi Commerce, Krzeminski was senior vice president, finance and chief accounting officer at McAfee, Inc., the world’s leading dedicated security technology company, where he oversaw worldwide finance and operations organizations. His executive experience also spans senior positions with EDS, Quaker State, Home Interiors & Gifts, Inc., and Coopers & Lybrand, an international accounting firm. Krzeminski is a Certified Public Accountant and an active member of Financial Executives International (FEI), where he serves as a board member in the Dallas chapter. He holds his bachelor’s degree in business administration from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Commerce Names Keith Krzeminski Chief Operating Officer and Executive Vice President,”
Bradenton Herald (Florida), April 19, 2011

Facing A 50 Percent Cut ... in state funding, the chancellor of Pennsylvania’s 14 state-owned universities boasted Monday that when Hollywood looks for animators for hit films such as ‘Toy Story’ it turns to Edinboro University in northwestern Pennsylvania. During an appearance before the Pennsylvania Press Club’s monthly luncheon, state System of Education Chancellor John Cavanaugh said the schools, once known as a training ground for teachers, also counts best-selling author Dean Koontz and YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley among its alumni.

—“SSHE Chancellor: ‘We Give The Best Value Out There,’ Capital Ideas,”
The Morning Call.com, April 18, 2011

Facing a 50 percent cut in state funding, the chancellor of Pennsylvania’s 14 state-owned universities boasted Monday that when Hollywood looks for animators, it turns to an acclaimed program at Edinboro University in Erie County. During an appearance before the Pennsylvania Press Club’s monthly luncheon, Chancellor John Cavanaugh said the schools, once mainly known as a training ground for teachers, also count best-selling author Dean Koontz and YouTube co-founder Chad Hurley among its alumni. Hurley is a graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania in Indiana County. "Higher education boss touts state universities as ‘best value,’

—“Allentown Morning Call,”
April 18, 2011

Citing a record number of applicants for the fall 2011 semester, Indiana University of Pennsylvania has stopped accepting incoming freshmen at its main campus and its Punxsutawney branch. James Begany, associate vice president for enrollment management at IUP, said Friday that the university had accepted 3,100 freshman, after receiving nearly 12,800 applications.That was almost 800 more than IUP received in 2010, a year in which the university set a record for applications.

—“IUP’s Freshman Class is Full,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, April 16, 2011

City officials and a planning intern have proposed three new bike routes for the Altoona area that complement existing and proposed routes to create a network. Public Works Director Dave Diedrich and Planning Director Lee Slusser drew a rough sketch, and intern Sarah Petrunak refined the design of the three new routes, Slusser said at a recent Altoona Planning Commission meeting. ‘She did the hard part,’ said Slusser of Petrunak, a graduate student in the Geography and Regional Planning Department at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Three Bike Routes Proposed for City,”
Altoona Mirror, April 18, 2011

The tragic human and economic situation in the Arab World demonstrates that the Arab tyrants have engaged in extensive destruction of precious resources and obstructed economic growth and sound investment programs. Washington’s unconditional support to Arab tyrants deepens freedom deficit, obstructs talent cultivation and development, and accelerates the depletion of whatever is left of Arab wealth. Dr. Abbas J. Ali is Professor and Director, School of International Management, Eberly College of Business and IT, Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Dictators Squandering the Arab Weath,”
Alijazeerah.com, April 18, 2011

Rob Wright has been named chief editor for VertMarkets’ Life Science Leader magazine. A 17-year veteran of the pharmaceutical industry, Wright previously worked in sales, training, and management with companies such as Schering-Plough, Merck, and Mead Johnson Nutritionals. Wright has had 20 articles published in industry publications and academic journals. He earned a degree in business administration from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and his master’s degree in business administration from Gannon University.

Business Briefs
Erie Times-News, April 10, 2011

Joann Marie Lang of Williamsburg may have retired from being the assistant superintendent of the Tyrone Area School District, but she is still involved in education, working as a consultant.Lang earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Penn State and a master’s in gifted and talented from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She also has a Supervisor Certificate in Curriculum and Instruction, a Principal Certificate and a Superintendent’s Letter of Eligibility from Penn State. Since her retirement, Lang serves as a trainer/facilitator in the PA Inspired Leadership Program and the National Institute for School Leadership. She interacts with professional men and women at all levels of education.

—“Blair County Group to Hold WISE Women Award Dinner,”
Altoona Mirror, April 10, 2011

The widow of a slain Pittsburgh police officer said that Wednesday’s announcement of a scholarship in her husband’s name at his college alma mater is something positive made from tragedy. ‘It’s nice for us as a family because all of the news is about the tragedy that happened and the events of that day,’ said Shandra Mayhle, the wife of Officer Stephen J. Mayhle, one of three officers gunned down in Stanton Heights two years ago. ‘It’s nice to make something positive. Stephen was proud to graduate from IUP.’ Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Downtown accounting firm KPMG announced the formation of the Pittsburgh Police Officer Stephen J. Mayhle/KPMG Memorial Scholarship. KPMG employee Julie Duvall, a friend of the Mayhle family, helped create the award.

—“Scholarship ‘Positive’ in Tragedy’s Shadow,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, April 7, 2011

Stephen's Scholarship — Shandra Mayhle, wife of fallen Pittsburgh Police Officer Stephen Mayhle, laughs with Randy Martin, chairman of Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s department of criminology, and Robert Krizner, KPMG managing partner, after announcing a scholarship in Stephen Mayhle’s honor. Next to Shandra is Julie Duvall, a KPMG senior administrative assistant. They have been friends since their grade school days at Indiana Wesleyan School in Indiana, Pa.

—Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 7, 2011

PITTSBURGH — Indiana University of Pennsylvania honored an alumni killed in Pittsburgh’s police tragedy two years ago. The university created the ‘Officer Stephen Mayhle Scholarship Fund.’ Mayhle is a graduate of IUP’s criminology department. The scholarship will go to a student who lost a family member serving in the line of duty as a police officer. Mayhle’s wife said the scholarship was a fitting tribute. ‘To have this put in place so every year he can be honored once again. It’s very rewarding for us as a family,’ Shandra Mayhle said. The first endowed scholarship will be awarded next year. Pittsburgh police officers Eric Kelly and Paul Sciullo also lost their lives in the Stanton Heights shootout.

—“Scholarship Created In Memory Of Fallen Officer,”
WPXI-TV (Pittsburgh), April 6, 2011

PITTSBURGH — The shooting of Clairton police Officer James Kuzak stirs powerful emotions for Shandra Mayhle, the widow of Pittsburgh police Officer Stephen Mayhle. ‘My heart just goes out to the family. I hope and pray that he is able to pull through this,’ Shandra Mayhle said Wednesday. Her husband was one of three Pittsburgh police officers who were shot and killed in Stanton Heights in April 2009. Shandra Mayhle told Channel 4 Action News reporter Bob Mayo that her thoughts are with Kuzak’s family and friends. ‘My heart breaks for them. I wouldn’t wish this on anybody,’ she said. Police from across the area have been reaching out to Kuzak’s circle where they wait by his bedside at UPMC Mercy. ‘The law enforcement is our family also, and I know for sure that there’s no way that I could have got through Stephen’s death without their support and their help,’ Mayhle said. Her husband will be remembered in another way next spring, with the first awarding of the Stephen Mayhle KPMG Memorial Scholarship at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Shandra Mayhle watches the announcement of the Stephen Mayhle scholarship at IUP. About $15,000 has been raised so far, and Mayhle hopes to increase that amount through more donations. Donations to the scholarship fund are being accepted through:

Foundation for IUP
1011 South Drive
103 Sutton Hall
Indiana, PA 15705

Call 724-357-5661 for more information about making a donation.
WTAE-TV Pittsburgh, April 6, 2011

Back in 1986, Robert James and Scott Blasey were students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania when they decided to form a band and play around college bars in the area. They added Greg Joseph on bass and Dave Minarik on drums and soon were making a name for themselves in the Pittsburgh area as The Clarks.

—“A Quarter Century with The Clarks,”
Patch.com (Falls Church, Va.), April 1, 2011

 

The Northern York High School’s music department will host the Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s symphony orchestra for a free concert at 7:30 p.m. April 1 in the high school auditorium.

—“School Roundup,”
Harrisburg Patriot-News, March 31, 2011

Aimee McNaul’s first place ‘Seabee’ quilt is more than just an artfully designed piece - it is a tribute to her father’s military career. Eighteen-year-old Aimee McNaul worked for more than three months on her quilt, which won first place among at least 50 others at the Pa. Maple Festival Aimee, a freshman at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, began working on the quilt during her Christmas break with the help of her grandmother.

—“Military Quilt Wins First Place in Contest,”
Somerset Daily American, March 30, 2011

The Indiana University of Pennsylvania Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of David Martynuik, will perform at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Richland High School Performing Arts Center, One Academic Ave. in Richland Township. Violinist Stanley Chepaitis and cellist Linda Jennings, will be the featured performers. Selections will include Respighi’s ‘Ancient Airs and Dances No. 2’ Chepaitas’ ‘Paganini in the Vernacular,’ Cassado’s ‘Requiebros’ and Borodin’s ‘Symphony No. 2.’ The free concert is part of the orchestra’s spring tour. The high school orchestra will join the university orchestra for a selection.

—“IUP Orchestra Slated to Play in Richland,”
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, March 30, 2011

College life is rarely conducive to grieving, according to ‘Living with Loss,’ by researchers at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Campus life is geared toward academic and social activities, leaving little room to make it through the grieving process. National Students of AMF (Ailing Mothers and Fathers) Support Network, a not-for-profit organization that helps students coping with death on college campuses, stresses that there is too much academic pressure to deal with grief properly. The phrase ‘college is supposed to be the best four years of your life’ can be confusing for grieving young adults.

—“College Not Helpful in Grief Process,”
Red and Black (University of Georgia), March 30, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania graduate student Belinda Arndt said she hopes to use her political science degree to work in government, but has been discouraged by what she’s heard from state politicians. ‘Pennsylvania should be helping the students,’ said Ms. Arndt. ‘It’s heartbreaking.’

—“Legislators to Restore Some Education Cuts,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 29, 2011

Students and faculty from Pennsylvania’s state-owned universities protested Gov. Tom Corbett’s proposed education cuts Monday on the Capitol steps. More than 500 people, many with signs and bullhorns, braved the cold for two hours while speakers led them in chants and touted the reasons education is vital to the commonwealth. Afterward hundreds waited to enter the Capitol for the colleges’ budget hearing for the House Appropriations Committee. Peter Roquemore of Camp Hill came with 45 other students from Indiana University of Pennsylvania for the protest. The proposed cuts won’t hurt him because he’s graduating this May, but they will hurt his younger sisters, he said. ‘The opportunities I’ve had are phenomenal,’ Roquemore said. He is a senior majoring in political science. He wants his sisters to have those opportunities, too.

—“Hundreds of Students Protest Proposed Education Cuts,”
PennLive (Harrisburg), March 28, 2011

SELLERSVILLE - Local National Guard units have a new battalion commander as Lt. Col. Mark D. Pike of Coatesville, Pa., assumed command of the 228th Brigade Support Battalion on Saturday. The Sellersville-based battalion includes companies in Scranton, Kingston, Bethlehem, Allentown, Pine Grove and Lock Haven. Col. Pike is a graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history. He received his commission upon completion of the ROTC program at IUP. He has more than 25 years in the service and has been in the Army Reserve since 1989.

—“Lt. Col. Pike Takes Command of 228th National Guard,”
Scranton Times-Tribune, March 28, 2011

The black segment of the overall population in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area, composed of Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Washington and Westmoreland counties, grew 0.8 percent. Western Pennsylvania’s highest increase was in Indiana County, where the black population jumped 73 percent, followed by Butler County’s 47.8 percent increase. In Westmoreland County, the number rose 15 percent. Melanie Hildebrandt, sociology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, attributes some of Indiana County’s black population increase to college students who are counted when living on campus. Total fall 2010 enrollment at IUP showed 13 percent of students were minorities, compared to 7.7 percent in 2000. The black population in Indiana County rose from 1,407 in 2000 to 2,434 in 2010. ‘It’s only about 1,000 people, so there could be a couple things going on here,’ she said. ‘... Sometimes minority students bring family members, children, partners and caregivers.’

—“Blacks Increase Numbers in Western Pennsylvania,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 28, 2011

Western Pennsylvania is the backdrop for an intriguing new Web series — ‘Battle Lords,’ a drama that centers on a group of people who re-create medieval war battles.The protagonist Nick — played by series writer-director-producer Nicky Allison — is tortured by dreams where he's killed in battle, only to wake up alive and well in the morning. Mr. Allison originally set out to be a rock musician but ended up in Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s communications media program studying filmmaking. ‘I finally decided to try something just as unrealistic and became a film producer,’ he said.

—“Cybertainment: ‘Battle Lords,’ a New Web Series, Uses Local Settings,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 27, 2011

In 1994, the company secured a temporary home in Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s small business incubator, and soon after made its first big sale — 1,000 pairs of insoles for the Israeli military, an order that Gresko still is unable to explain.

—“Insoles Support Family-Run Business,”
Blairsville Dispatch-Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 25, 2011

Nearly a year ago, Ardiem launched its first collaboration with neighboring Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Faculty from IUP’s physics and biology departments helped Ardiem develop a Phase 1 application for a Small Business Innovation Research Grant offered through the National Institutes of Health. The program offers grants not to exceed $150,000 in total costs over six months. At the time of the application, Tracey Missien, IUP’s interim director of economic development, said the university was looking forward to the project as ‘a new milestone that we believe will continue to advance our reputation as a research university.’

—“Demand Is On Upswing For Indiana Firm’s Implantable Devices,”
Blairsville Dispatch/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 25, 2011

Rather than letting the disease dampen her spirits, Ms. Contino, now 19 and an accounting major at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, fought back. ‘I refuse to let MS get me down,’ she said ‘I’m working 21 hours a week on campus and taking 15 credits at the same time. I feel the best medicine is to maintain a positive attitude.’ She has fought back by organizing fundraising events for research by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society that have brought in more than $75,000 through two dinners and annual MS Walks.

—“College Student Keeps Up Fight Against MS,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 24, 2011

Times of global disaster are ripe for hyper-social networking. Friends sound-off on their walls, and vigorously tweet and blog of impending doom and gloom. And all these updates raise a tough question: How do you respond? The Situation: A Facebook friend and trauma survivor posts feelings of confusion, loss, anxiety and sadness. How to Respond: Don’t stay silent. Even if you don’t quite know what to say, say something/ Be simple and direct, and let them know that you’re there for them. Dr Krys Kaniasty, a psychology professor at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania and social support researcher who has studied natural disasters and trauma survivors, recommends sending a private message that says something to effect of ‘I just read your post. If you need to talk, I’m here for you.’ Make sure to include a a phone number - sometimes people need to talk. The important thing here is to keep the personal chatter off the Internet. ‘You don’t want to risk provoking them into posting something publicly that they’ll later regret, Kaniasty says.’

—“An Etiquette Guide To Tsunamis And Other Disasters,”
Lifehacker, March 23, 2011

The union representing about 6,000 faculty and coaches at the 14 state-owned universities ‘agreed in principle’ to pass up about $12 million in raises with a one-year wage freeze, leaders announced yesterday. Peter Broad, a professor of Spanish at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and chairman of the university senate, said he is glad to be retiring at the end of this semester. He said he thinks the union will be able to get its membership behind the pay freeze. ‘But I can’t speak for the administrators,’ Broad said. ‘Administrators include a lot more people than just presidents and provosts and deans; some are overpaid, and some are not.’

—“State-Owned University Union Reps Agree to Wage Freeze,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 22, 2011

Times of global disaster are ripe for hyper-social networking. Friends sound-off on their walls, and vigorously tweet and blog of impending doom and gloom. And all these updates raise a tough question: How do you respond? Don’t stay silent. Even if you don’t quite know what to say, say something/ Be simple and direct, and let them know that you’re there for them. Dr. Krys Kaniasty, a psychology professor at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania and social support researcher who has studied natural disasters and trauma survivors, recommends sending a private message that says something to effect of ‘I just read your post. If you need to talk, I'm here for you.’ Make sure to include a a phone number-sometimes people need to talk. The important thing here is to keep the personal chatter off the Internet. ‘You don’t want to risk provoking them into posting something publicly that they’ll later regret,’ Kaniasty says.

—“An Etiquette Guide to Tsunamis and Other Disasters,”
Gizmodo, March 22, 2011

‘Often you get a more stoic, less emotional parent usually the man — while the woman is grieving more openly,’ says Dr. Laura Marshak, a marriage counselor and the author of ‘Married with Special-Needs Children: A Couple’s Guide to Keeping Connected.’ ‘Very often, the mother goes into overdrive, where every waking moment gets devoted to learning more, to finding services, to connecting with other mothers. It becomes consuming. At that point, couples often get divided.’

—“Don’t Let Your Marriage Be a Casualty of Your Child’s Mental Illness,”
The Huffington Post, March 18, 2011

Steve Miskin, spokesman for House Speaker Sam Smith, R-Punxsutawney, said lawmakers’ devotion to alma maters would be a factor, but‘not the deciding factor.’ They’ll judge Corbett’s ideas on‘the impact on communities and the impact on Pennsylvanians, said Smith, who graduated from Penn State University with a journalism degree in 1978 and serves on the board of Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“State-Supported Universities to Find Out How Much Alma Matters
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 16, 2011

The WVIA Board of Trustees has named Tom Curra executive vice president of the region’s PBS and NPR broadcast stations. In this role, Curra, of Waverly, is designated the stations' number two executive at the request of WVIA President and CEO Bill Kelly. A native of Long Island, he is a graduate of the Indiana University of Pennsylvania where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in mass communications.

—“Waverly Resident Named V.P. at WVIA,”
The Abington Journal, March 16, 2011

Rosemary Gido calls state prisons asylums for the invisible, particularly women. A criminology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Gido said an estimated 42 percent of women in U.S. jails and prisons are mentally ill, compared with 24 percent of men. In Pennsylvania, the Department of Corrections reports that 44 percent of female inmates and 18.6 percent of male inmates have mental health issues. Women are more likely to have a co-occurring disorder - meaning mental health problems combined with drug or alcohol abuse - and a history of trauma, according to Gido, the former director of program and policy analysis for the New York State Commission of Corrections.

—“Professors: Prison Fails Mentally Ill Women,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 13, 2011

Hill, who has spent her entire career working in human services, grew up in Indiana, Pa. and majored in psychology at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.After graduating, she moved to Kittaning to work at a drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility at 20 years old. ‘I stayed there for 10 years and learned all kinds of things about addiction, about recovery, counseling and helping people,’ Hill said. ‘It was a hard and wonderful learning ground and I left there as their clinical director. I worked my way up from aid to counselor, to supervisor.’

— “Swissvale’s Betty Hill Leads Organization Focused on Gay Community,”
Forest Hills-Regent Square Patch, March 6, 2011

Where piles of scrap metal once sat at the entrance to Indiana University of Pennsylvania, bricks and glass and metal have been pieced together to form a 150,000-square-foot facility touted as an economic engine for Indiana County. The Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex, a $79 million facility that will host both university events and national acts, opened officially to the public Friday afternoon. About 1,500 people, including some who lined up an hour before the doors opened, attended the public grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony. ‘People are really excited to be here and see it finally, and I think the reaction, like mine, is ‘Wow!,’said IUP Interim President David Werner.

— “Complex Will Attract Music Acts, Business to IUP,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 5, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania celebrated the opening of its new athletic center today with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The $79 million Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Center has been in the works for more than 10 years. ‘It’s exciting for the community, both the university community and the Indiana community in the region,’ said David Werner, IUP’s president. ‘This is a community project, not just an IUP project.’

— “IUP Unveils Brand New Athletic Center,”
KDKA-TV (Pittsburgh, Pa.), March 4, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania celebrated the opening of its new arena, the Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex.

— “IUP Opens New Arena,”
WTAE-TV (Pittsburgh, Pa.), March 4, 2011

Indiana University of Pennsylvania is set to cut the ribbon on a new $79 million, 5,000-seat athletic arena and convention complex. Doors to the Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex will open Friday afternoon, after which people will be able to tour the new building. It is named for a local family that donated $2 million to the project. The center includes an athletic arena for basketball and other sports, a 650-seat auditorium, conference space and other offices. University officials expect the venue to host 140 events a year, including school athletics and other activities, as well as outside entertainment. A March 10 appearance by the Harlem Globetrotters is the first ticketed event. Rock concerts and the Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey Circus are also scheduled.

— “IUP Set To Open New $79 Million, 5,000-Seat Arena,”
WJAC-TV (Johnstown-Altoona-State College, Pa.), March 4, 2011

Standing courtside, as he waited to join others in a ribbon-cutting ceremony, State System of Higher Education Chancellor John Cavanaugh called the place ‘a game-changer’ for the Indiana region. David Werner, interim president of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, looked toward the rafters as he summed up in one word his feeling about the new arena next to campus: ‘Wow!’ The public this afternoon got its first look at the newly completed Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex, a $79 million venue with a 5,000-seat arena built by IUP. Local members of Congress and other elected officials as well as university representatives joined several hundred others for a grand opening at 4 p.m., celebrating what community leaders predict will be a cultural and economic boost to the Indiana region.

— “IUP Unveils Brand New Athletic Center,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 4, 2011

When Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s faculty voted it had no confidence in President Lawrence J. Pettit in November 2001, the public reason was that he had ordered the closing of a cherished laboratory school for children run by the university. But there was a scandalous undertone fueled by an anonymous letter circulating that repeated an accusation Pettit’s ex-wife made when she left him three years before: Pettit had a sexual affair with a male student. Pettit denies that rumor and denies that he is gay. But it was ‘the elephant in the room’ that, mixed with some partisan politics, would lead Pettit to retire from IUP after 11 years, he said. He wrote about it last year in a self-published memoir, ‘If You Live by the Sword: Politics in the Making and Unmaking of a University President.’ ‘It was something I couldn’t deal with directly, and that kind of rumor is hard to disprove,’ Pettit, 73, said Thursday. ‘To some extent, some people might think it cheapens the book that is essentially an academic book. But I couldn’t write about the last years of my career and not write about it.’ Pettit, who moved to his home state of Montana in 2007, is in Indiana to attend today’s opening of the $79 million Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex, a project he initiated as president.

— “IUP Ex-President Cites Politics in Departure,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 4, 2011

Nick Sciullo didn't understand when a classmate called him ‘retarded’ in the locker room at school. It was the first time the Latrobe teen, who has Down syndrome, had ever heard the slur — a fact that was not lost on his mother, Regina Sciullo. ‘That’s what we want with our children, not to even know what it means. Not to even have heard it,’ said Regina Sciullo, who works as a disability advocate for The Arc of Westmoreland County. ‘As this generation and the next generation grows up, we need to erase that word from their vocabulary.’ To get that message out, the Westmoreland County Behavioral Health and Developmental Services office along with agencies that work with people with intellectual disabilities is hosting an End the R-Word Party Saturday from 11 to 5 at Westmoreland Mall. Ben Rafoth, a professor of English at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, said the words ‘retard’ and ‘retarded’ are akin to ‘Negro’ or even ‘black’ when ‘African American’ is a more specific term. ‘It’s not just a matter of political preference or political correctness, but sometimes there are reasons to be more accurate or because something has changed or facts have changed and a new label is warranted,’ Rafoth said. ‘I think that the point here is whoever the term is being applied to should have a lot of say in how they are called.’ Rafoth said people get frustrated by the cycle that occurs when a neutral term, such as ‘mental retardation,’ is twisted into a slur and a new neutral term is developed. But Rafoth said at the root of it are deep-seated attitudes about certain people. ‘Groups of people who have been historically seen as lesser in some way or who are vulnerable ... are often the focus of negative labels, and so I think that really the call to change labels is not just about the words we use, but it’s also asking us to think about our attitudes toward people who are vulnerable, weak or just discriminated against,’ he said.

— “Slurs Against Intellectually Disabled Battled,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 4, 2011

After the ceremony, individuals will be able to tour the building until 6 p.m., and refreshments will be available. The center next to campus is expected to host nearly 140 events a year such as concerts and other kinds of entertainment, IUP spokeswoman Michelle Fryling said. A March 10 appearance by the Harlem Globetrotters will be the first ticketed event, and other shows already planned range from the Steve Miller Band with Gregg Allman to circus performances by Ringling Bros. Campus sporting and other university events including May commencement will be held at the center. The complex is named for the Kovalchick family of Indiana, who gave $2 million toward the development. The project broke ground in November 2008 and was completed three months ahead of schedule. Officials are predicting the 150,000-square-foot development;— the county’s largest venue;— will generate $12.5 million annually to the area economy.

—“IUP to Hold Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony For New Arena,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 4, 2011

Mark Anthony, director of the Career Development Center at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, called the current job market ‘challenging’ for its graduates. But he said those with degrees in safety science do the best, with salaries ranging from $55,000 to $62,000 a year. Take Eric Porter, 28, of Indiana. He graduated from IUP with a bachelor’s degree in marketing. He worked in sales, disliked it and went back to IUP, where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in safety science in May. He now works as the safety, health and environmental administrator at McConway cq & Torley LLC, a steel foundry in Lawrenceville. He gives safety training to employees and contractors.

Advanced Degree May Not Help Much in Region’s Job Market,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Feb. 27, 2011

Frank Mayes, of Rochester Mills, understood why the eldest of his three daughters, Christine, wanted to join the military. A former Army soldier himself, Mr. Mayes remembers Christine’s excitement to enlist directly from high school — that same thrill she felt during her three-year tour of Germany, and again just a few months later, when as a student at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania, her Army Reserve unit was called to serve in Operation Desert Storm, the first Gulf War.

Those Lost in 1991 Scud Attack Recalled,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Feb. 26, 2011

INDIANA, Pa. (KDKA) - A group of communications graduate students at Indiana University of Pennsylvania have created a digital world that makes it easier for people to learn about the Civil Rights Movement. ‘I really felt like the project brought the movement - which is a topic that we tend to shy away from or know only a very small portion of information about - I thought that by us working on the project, it not only informed us of that time and the Civil Rights Movement, but also by the video and the second life itself creating an avatar of color,’ said Malaika Turner, an IUP grad student.

—“Black History Month: IUP Virtual Life.”
KDKA-TV (Pittsburgh), Feb. 24. 2011

While Michele Papakie, who serves as inspector general for the 171st and is responsible for overseeing reports of fraud, waste and abuse, was stationed overseas from April to October last year, she was able to use a laptop she brought with her to stay in touch with family members using the Skype service, and updated her Facebook status constantly. She and her son even were able to stay in contact online while he was in basic training about three years ago. As a journalism professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in her civilian life, Papakie said she appreciates the joy of having access to easy communications with her family and even her students.

—“Reaching Loved Ones in Military Easier Today,”
Beaver County Times, Feb. 24, 2011

The words ‘you have cancer’ can send seismic shock waves through even the most steely and strong-willed person. Suddenly, you are a patient hurtling into unknown territory, a lonely and mysterious place. But you are not alone. An entire team of specialists are working with you. Here are just a few of the people that you might encounter on Team Survivor. TARYN REBUCK - Registered dietitian - Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute. Education: Bachelor’s degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a graduate of Geisinger Medical Center Dietetic Internship. Responsibilities: Physicians or nurses refer patients to Rebuck for a variety of nutrition problems, including weight loss, severe nausea/vomiting from treatments, decreased appetite and taste changes from treatments and evaluation of tube feedings if needed.

—“8 People You Might Meet After a Cancer Diagnosis,”
PennLive/Harrisburg Patriot-News, Feb. 17, 2011

Caleb P.S. Finegan Notable: Finegan was one of 75 scholars worldwide invited to participate in the inaugural Pilgrimage Studies Workshop. The event will be held Friday through Feb. 20 in Washington. The workshop will begin with film stars Emilio Estevez and Martin Sheen hosting a screening of their new movie, "The Way," a fictional account of a man's journey on the Camino de Santiago, the Way of St. James. The movie was filmed entirely in Spain and France along the pilgrimage's historic route from Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, France, to Santiago de Compostela, Spain. Scholars attending the workshop are seeking to create a consortium of more than 30 American and Canadian universities that will offer summer seminars in Pilgrimage Studies in Spain starting in 2012.

— “Newsmaker: Caleb P.S. Finegan,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Feb. 13, 2011

Imagine what it would be like to learn about the past by stepping into the pages of a history book. Graduate students in the communications media program at Indiana University of Pennsylvania are using Second Life to bring milestones in history to life in a three-dimensional virtual world. In the fall 2010 semester, they completed a project designed to teach college-level students about the civil rights movement. Allen Partridge, a professor in IUP’s communications media department, has Ph.D. students in his Simulation of Games class use Second Life as part of their course work. Dr. Partridge also has a background in game design: He has created many two- and three-dimensional interactive computer games and has written several books on the topic. The students chose the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ‘60s and created a series of scenarios that document and explain those turbulent times.

—“Reliving History: Virtual World Lets IUP Students Participate in Critical Civil Rights Battles,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Feb. 9, 2011

If there’s one thing that Rosemary Gido wants her students to know, it’s this: ‘It’s not rocket science. Jails and prisons are the new asylums,’ she says. As a professor of criminology at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Gido has been studying how the criminal justice system treats two populations—women and the mentally ill—and how those two groups often overlap.

—“Jails Are the New Asylums for Women,”
Chicago Now, Feb. 1, 2011

Louis Jacobs of Cherry Tree has a history of serving his country, teaching students for many years and volunteering in many ways. Something else he appreciates about his Navy service is being able to go to college on the G.I. Bill. He said he was in the first class of veterans to go to Indiana State Teachers College, now Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He received a business education degree. After graduation he began teaching at Cherry Tree High School and went on to Duquesne University during the summers and on Saturdays to get a master’s degree in administration, also using funding from the G.I. Bill.

—“Veteran Recalls WWII and Other Life Experiences,”
Clearfield Progress, Jan. 29, 2011

DUBOIS - DuBois School Board got a firsthand look at DuBois Area High School's new career center opportunities and a new welcome packet at its meeting last night. DAHS Principal Roger Collins, Elizabeth Drahushak and Anne Young provided an overview of each. Collins said the welcome packets were an idea he had that would allow him to have something to work off of when speaking with parents and prospective students. Young approached him about project ideas for her internship at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and he suggested she develop the welcome packet.

—“DuBois Offers Career Center for Students,”
Clearfield Progress, Jan. 27, 2011

Sarah Brislin Hasker, Greensburg, recently earned her Doctorate in Psychology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Hasker completed her pre-doctoral psychology internship at Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, where she graduated with honors and received the Ester Mandelkar Award for Excellence in Therapeutic Skills. She earned her Master of Arts degree in clinical psychology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2007. While in graduate school, she was the recipient of the 2009 IUP Chacivity Award. She was also the recipient of the IUP Foundation Doctoral Fellowship in 2005, 2007 and 2008. Hasker is a 2005 graduate of The Pennsylvania State University. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, Pennsylvania Psychological Association, and the American Group Psychotherapy Association. Hasker is working towards gaining licensure as a clinical psychologist in Pennsylvania. She is employed at Ligonier Valley Learning Center, Kreinbrook Psychological Services group private practice, and is teaching at Westmoreland Community College.

—“Names and Faces,”
Times-Leader, Jan. 24, 2011

Standing on the stage of the Embassy Theatre, Jason Worzbyt engaged the audience. ‘This is where it starts,’ said Worzbyt with the flip of his conductor baton toward the student band behind him. This is where, says Worzbyt, the love for music grows and future musicians are inspired, in opportunities like this. Worzbyt, a professor of bassoon and associate director of bands from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, was referring to the young musicians and teachers gathered for the Indiana Music Educators Association’s state convention - a three-day event that ends today. Worzbyt was conducting the Indiana Junior All-State Band in a Friday afternoon performance. He worked with the band in several sessions this week before showing off what they had learned in their performance at the Embassy. The junior band is made up of seventh- to ninth-graders from across Indiana. More then 3,000 teachers and students are participating in the convention. Over 100 workshops, clinics and performances are being offered.

—“Surrounded by Sound,”
Fort Wayne (IN) News-Sentinel, Jan. 22, 2011

The Pennsylvania Association of School Administrators named Kathleen R. Kelley, superintendent of the Williamsport Area School District, the 2011 Pennsylvania Superintendent of the Year. Dr. Kelley holds a bachelor’s degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, a master's in education from California University of Pennsylvania and a doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh.

“East Notable” column,
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Jan. 20, 2011

Jack Thomas, provost and academic vice president at Western Illinois University, has been named the university’s 11th president, effective July 1. He earned his doctorate in English literature and criticism from Indiana University of Pennsylvania; his master’s degree from Virginia State University; and his bachelor’s degree in English from Alabama A&M University. Thomas also is a 2005 graduate of the Harvard Institute for Management and Leadership Education program.

—Quincy (Illinois) Herald Whig, Jan. 18, 2011

The Media-Upper Providence Library, 1 E. Front Street in Media, will host a book signing for local author Joey Lynn Sarkees from 1:30-3:30 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 30. Sarkees is the author of ‘Earth Angels: A True Story of Heroism in the Face of Tragedy’ (published by iUniverse). In ‘Earth Angels,’ Sarkees tells the incredible true story of how a group of female rugby players used their strengths as teammates to act as heroes in a deadly situation. On a foggy morning in April 2003, 17 Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) Women’s Rugby Club teammates were traveling on the Pennsylvania Turnpike on their way to a match. The weather conditions made driving hazardous, and the women were witness to one of the worst traffic accidents in the Turnpike’s history: more than 20 vehicles were involved with more than 25 injuries and four fatalities. Not missing a beat, the group of brave young women spent the next several hours aiding victims and medical personnel, surrounded by burning vehicles, bleeding bodies and general chaos. Using the skills honed by working together on the rugby field, the IUP players selflessly gave up personal possessions and took directions from emergency responders, operating as one unit.

—“Media-Upper Providence Library Hosts Local Author for Book Signing,”
Delaware County News Network, Jan. 17, 2011

From his career as a surveyor for the Penn family to becoming the ‘Hero of Armstrong County,’ retired Indiana University of Pennsylvania English professor and history author Bill Betts of Indiana provides a comprehensive view of the life and accomplishments of Gen. John Armstrong in a biography of Armstrong published by Heritage Books being released this month. ‘Rank and Gravity, The Life of General John Armstrong of Carlisle’ will soon be available for purchase online at Heritage Books of Westminster, Md, and at Amazon.com. ‘The book is the first, and long overdue, biography of this very important colonial figure, one of the most notable and consequential of 18th-century Pennsylvania,’ said Betts.

—“Indiana Historian Tells Story of Armstrong County Namesake,”
Kittanning Leader-Times, Jan. 15, 2011

Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex Cost: $79 million Completion date: March Impact: Expected to generate $22 million annually for the region, according to the university. What it is: It will include the 4,000- to 6,000-seat Ed Fry Arena, the 650-seat Christine Toretti Auditorium, athletic department administrative offices and conference facilities. According to the university, it’s designed to serve as a cultural and economic development resource for the region. It’s named in honor of the Kovalchick family of Indiana, who donated $2 million for the facility’s construction. First event: The Ed Fry Arena will host the Harlem Globetrotters on March 10.

—“Construction Around Campus: Indiana University of Pennsylvania,”
Pittsburgh Business Times, Jan. 14, 2011

Her musical pedigree is as American as it gets. She graduated from Wissahickon High School, Class of 1970, attended Indiana University of Pennsylvania and did her post-graduate work at the University of Michigan and the Eastman School of Music.‘I think I’ve always been attracted to the unusual,’ Coleman said. ‘Even when I first went to undergraduate school at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, my teacher there . loved the 20th-century repertoire, so from day one he was throwing this stuff at me. It was a wonderful experience.’‘I found myself drawn to more and more of the esoteric repertoire, for the way it puts the music of Bach and Beethoven into a different kind of perspective for me.’

—“Donna Coleman Returns Home to Offer Free Recitals,”
Montgomery (Pa.) News, Jan. 11, 2011

Robert Heasley, a sociology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and president of the association, has accused the new movement of ‘inventing something that I think already exists.’ And at the Wagner College conference, Rocco Capraro, a history professor at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, said much the same thing. Men’s studies had been around for 30 years, he pointed out, and was ‘an emerging interdisciplinary field concerned with men’s identity and experience in the present, over time, across space.’  His definition was sufficiently vague, in other words, that it seemed to cover just about everything male-related, and he suggested that the differences between men’s studies and male studies were mostly ones of emphasis. Actually, the differences are a good deal deeper than that. One argument that male studies advocates make is that men’s studies has essentially been co-opted. According to Professor Tiger, the trouble with men’s studies is that it’s ‘a wholly owned branch of women’s studies.’ There is also a political dimension to the split. ‘I’d like to get away from this terminology but it’s true,’ Professor Heasley said in a recent interview. ‘It’s left wing/right wing.’ But ultimately the differences have to do with radically different notions of what it means to be a man in the first place.

—“The Study of Man (or Males),”
New York Times Education Section, Jan. 7, 2011

Brenda Shaffer, the recently-retired pastor of Beulah United Methodist Church in Friedens, has a very simple philosophy in life. ‘You have a responsibility to use the gifts and talents you have been given to help people and the community you live in,’ she said. The 66-year-old Shade Township native and current Stoystown resident started her working life as an elementary school teacher in Maryland and had moved back to the area in 1971. She originally graduated in 1966 from Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. A partial recounting of her extensive continuing education includes a master’s degree equivalency from the Pennsylvania State University, a master’s degree from IUP in educational psychology and Divinity School at Duke University in North Carolina.

—“Shaffer Bases Her Life on Responsibility to Help Others,”
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, Jan. 9, 2011

Thomas R. Merkel, son of Timothy and Diana Merkel of Bechtelsville, was named recipient of The Pennsylvania Vector Control Association Student Research Award during a recent symposium.  A senior at Indiana University of Pennsylvania where he is majoring in biology and criminology, Merkel was invited to offer a presentation on research conducted during his internship with Indiana County’s West Nile Virus Program.

—“Area Students are Making the Grade,”
Jan. 9, 2011

Thomas R. Merkel, Bechtelsville, a December graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, received the Pennsylvania Vector Control Association’s 2010 Student Research Award. Merkel was a biology and criminology major at IUP. He is a 2006 graduate of Boyertown Area High School. His research project was based on work he did as an intern with the Indiana County West Nile Virus program.

—“Campus Notes,”
Reading Eagle, Jan. 9, 2011