Save the Date: OSHA Events

  • OSHA, the National Safety Council, the American Industrial Hygiene Association, the American Society of Safety Engineers, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health have announced June 12–18 as Safe + Sound Week.

    The event is a nationwide effort to raise awareness of the value of workplace safety and health programs through the Safe + Sound Campaign. These programs can help employers and workers identify and manage workplace hazards before they cause injury or illness, improving the bottom line.

    Throughout this week, organizations of all sizes and any industry are encouraged to host events and activities that showcase the core elements of an effective safety and health program—management leadership, worker participation, and finding and fixing workplace hazards. 

    Visit the Safe + Sound Week webpage to sign up for e-mail updates on the event. Additional resources to assist participants in planning and promoting Safe + Sound Week activities are under development.

    I hope you will share this information with your members and others, including workers and downstream customers, as part of our safety and health outreach efforts together. 

    OSHA to delay enforcing crystalline silica standard in the construction industry

    The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration today announced a delay in enforcement of the crystalline silica standard that applies to the construction industry to conduct additional outreach and provide educational materials and guidance for employers.

    The agency has determined that additional guidance is necessary due to the unique nature of the requirements in the construction standard. Originally scheduled to begin June 23, 2017, enforcement will now begin Sept. 23, 2017.

    OSHA expects employers in the construction industry to continue to take steps either to come into compliance with the new permissible exposure limit, or to implement specific dust controls for certain operations as provided in Table 1 of the standard. Construction employers should also continue to prepare to implement the standard's other requirements, including exposure assessment, medical surveillance and employee training.

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

    National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls in Construction, May 8–12, 2017

    What is a Safety Stand-Down?

    A Safety Stand-Down is a voluntary event for employers to talk directly to employees about safety. Any workplace can hold a stand-down by taking a break to focus on "Fall Hazards" and reinforcing the importance of "Fall Prevention." It's an opportunity for employers to have a conversation with employees about hazards, protective methods, and the company's safety policies and goals. It can also be an opportunity for employees to talk to management about fall hazards they see.

    Who Can Participate?

    Anyone who wants to prevent falls in the workplace can participate in the Stand-Down. In past years, participants included commercial construction companies of all sizes, residential construction contractors, sub- and independent contractors, highway construction companies, general industry employers, the U.S. Military, other government participants, unions, employer's trade associations, institutes, employee interest organizations, and safety equipment manufacturers.

    Partners

    OSHA is partnering with key groups to assist with this effort, including the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), OSHA approved State Plans, State consultation programs, the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the National Safety Council, the National Construction Safety Executives (NCSE), the U.S. Air Force, and the OSHA Training Institute (OTI) Education Centers.

    How to Conduct a Safety Stand-Down and FAQ

    Companies can conduct a Safety Stand-Down by taking a break to have a toolbox talk or another safety activity such as conducting safety equipment inspections, developing rescue plans, or discussing job specific hazards. Managers are encouraged to plan a stand-down that works best for their workplace anytime during the May 8-12, 2017. See Suggestions to Prepare for a Successful "Stand-Down" and Highlights from the Past Stand-Downs. OSHA also hosts an Events page with events that are free and open to the public to help employers and employees find events in your area.

    Certificate of Participation

    Employers will be able to provide feedback about their Stand-Down and download a Certificate of Participation following the Stand-Down.

    Share Your Story With Us

    If you want to share information with OSHA on your Safety Stand-Down, Fall Prevention Programs or suggestions on how we can improve future initiatives like this, please send your email to oshastanddown@dol.gov. Also share your Stand-Down story on social media, with the hashtag: #StandDown4Safety .

    If you plan to host a free event that is open to the public, see OSHA's Events page to submit the event details and to contact your Regional Stand-Down Coordinator.