Pavloski and Student Present Research with Implications for Neurotechnology Innovations

Posted on 11/30/2015 9:14:09 AM
Ian Bright and professor Pavloski

Ian Bright (left) and Professor Raymond Pavloski are pictured in front of a research poster at the Research Experiences for Summer Scholars. They both presented research recently at Neurotechnix 2015: the third International Congress on Neurotechnology, Electronics, and Informatics in Lisbon, Portugal.

Pavloski's Research Explores Visual Unity

Raymond Pavloski, Department of Psychology, presented results of his recent research in a paper titled “Toward Sentient Neurotechnology: Visual Object Unity May be Structured by and Constrain Neural Interactions” at Neurotechnix 2015: the third International Congress on Neurotechnology, Electronics, and Informatics in Lisbon, Portugal.

This work provides evidence for Pavloski’s theory that visual unity, an aspect of perceptual organization, is a large-scale structure of recurrent neuron inputs in the richly interconnected networks of the visual system. 

An exciting potential application of Pavloski’s research is in the future development of neural prosthetic devices. Such devices would help to synthesize aspects of experience that have been lost as a result of brain injury.

Conference organizers also invited Pavloski to serve as a session chair for presentations on neural rehabilitation and neurosensing and diagnosis.

Bright Presents Data from His Experiments

Ian Bright, dual mathematics and psychology major and senior student in the Robert E. Cook Honors College, presented data from two experiments designed to test a prediction of Pavloski’s theory in his talk, “Hysteresis in the Perception of Visual Unity.”

Bright completed one of these experiments with Pavloski as mentor as part of his participation in the Research Experiences for Summer Scholars program that is offered and supported by the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and coordinated by Justin Fair, a faculty member of the Chemistry Department.

Reviewers of Bright’s submission for a poster presentation invited him to give an oral presentation because of the high quality of his submission. Bright was the only undergraduate student to present research at this cutting-edge, multidisciplinary international conference.

Two papers describing the research presented by Pavloski and Bright have been published in the Proceedings of the 3rd International Congress on Neurotechnology, Electronics and Informatics, and are available from the SCITEPRESS Digital Library.


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