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Dining Innovations

December 7, 2015
Appeared in the Fall-Winter 2015 issue of
IUP Magazine


Folger Dining Hall, then and now. Photo: Keith Boyer

Folger Hall, then and now: The view from Pratt Drive and Maple Street in October 2015 and, in the inset, in the 1970s. Photo: Keith Boyer

After 16 months of renovations, Folger Hall reopened in October. Work on Folger was the second phase of IUP’s $37-million dining master plan.

Phase I was construction of the Crimson Café, open since last fall between Stabley Library and Cogswell Hall. The third phase will be construction of the North Dining commons, in the footprint of Keith Hall. Keith will be razed this spring, and the North Dining hall is expected to open during the 2017–18 academic year. After the new hall opens, Foster Dining Hall will be demolished.

Containing 43 percent recycled content, the revamped Folger boasts a light environmental footprint. Features include LED fixtures throughout the facility and chairs made from more than 26,000 recycled plastic bottles. Folger’s cuisine caters to all tastes, from traditional to international.

Folger’s cuisine caters to all tastes, from traditional to international. Photo: Keith Boyer

Folger’s cuisine caters to all tastes, from traditional to international. Photo: Keith Boyer

A sectioned-off dining area at the front of Folger features a fireplace and lounge-style seating. Photo: Keith Boyer

A sectioned-off dining area at the front of Folger features a fireplace and lounge-style seating. Photo: Keith Boyer

The Crimson Café, as it appears from the roof of Sprowls Hall, opened in fall 2014. Fisher Auditorium and Stabley Library can be seen in the background. Photo: Keith Boyer

The Crimson Café, as it appears from the roof of Sprowls Hall, opened in fall 2014. Fisher Auditorium and Stabley Library can be seen in the background. Photo: Keith Boyer

An artist’s rendering, still subject to change, of the North Dining commons, to be built in the footprint of Keith Hall. Credit: Stantec

An artist’s rendering, still subject to change, of the North Dining commons, to be built in the footprint of Keith Hall. Credit: Stantec

More from the Fall-Winter 2015 Issue of IUP Magazine

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‘A Hell of a Ride’

For more than 30 years, IUP safety alumni have boosted the U.S. space program by filling a number of roles at Florida’s Kennedy Space Center.

Early Bird Research

Early Bird Research

A Natural Sciences and Mathematics program is equipping undergraduates with research experience as well as general career-building skills.

Message from the President

Back in the early ’80s, the stereotype of engineers as lone geniuses was prevalent.... Only later did leaders in engineering practice demand that teamwork, communication, and leadership skills be part of the core education.

Namedroppers | Achievements | Mentors

Photo Gallery | Milestone Generosity | Letters to the Editor

Web Exclusives

Photo Galleries: The Oak Grove and Thomas Sutton Hall

From Wartime to ‘Wild Hour’

The IUP campus is far different from the one Marian Templeton Brown ’45 knew at the height of World War II.

The Haunted Halls of IUP

With Keith and Leonard halls slated for demolition, IUP’s Paranormal Society looks to the future of ghost hunting, minus two campus hot spots.

Vantage Point

Selected IUP faculty respond to the question:"How has electronic communication affected society, and how will it continue to do so?"

Miracle on the Streets

A peace movement started by an IUP alumnus cut the homicide rate in Boston by nearly 80 percent and has since been emulated around the world.

A ‘Ma’ to All

Olive Folger. Credit: IUP Archives

Dedicated on Homecoming weekend, 1972, Folger Hall was named for Olive K. Folger, the dietitian at Indiana State Teachers College from 1934 to 1958. Ma Folger, as the students knew her, moved to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after her retirement but returned to Indiana for the building’s dedication.

Folger received her basic dietetics education at Simmons College in Boston and earned her BS in home economics from ISTC in 1948. Before coming to Indiana, she was the dietitian at Brantwood Hall, a school for girls in Bronxville, New York. She also had worked for the Associated Press in Boston.

A fan of ISTC sports, Folger had a tradition of walking around, clanging a bell, at football games. A four-year team member, Jim Laughlin ’51 was busy on the field but aware of Folger’s support. “She was crazy about football,” he said.

A retired dean in IUP’s Student Services area, Laughlin as a student saw Folger often. They lived on opposite sides of the Team House, a duplex across Grant Street from the dining hall in Thomas Sutton. Although team practice often finished past normal dinner time, Folger would have food waiting. Sometimes, she was accompanied in the dining hall by her bulldog, Tutu.

“She took pride in what she was doing,” Laughlin said. “She was the boss.”

Even after she retired, Folger’s nurturing spirit continued. In Fort Lauderdale in the 1960s, she held annual late-winter dinners for people from Indiana who were in the area.