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November 2010

Pittsburgh Post Gazette (USA) - IUP website takes archaeology class into a virtual dig. ‘Indiana University of Pennsylvania has carved out a virtual dig for its archaeology students in Second Life. Second Life is the popular online destination for people who want to socialize, play games or buy and sell stuff in an alternative world. But virtual worlds are also an educational tool whose potential is beginning to be tapped by projects such as IUP’s Archaeology Island in Second Life.’

—“The Watch — Virtual Worlds in the News,”
The Metaverse Journal

Raymond G. Edwards, Wernersville, was part of an Indiana University of Pennsylvania team that placed second overall in a business competition at Peoples Educational Society in Bangalore, India. Edwards, a 2007 graduate of Conrad Weiser High School, is an economics and international business major in IUP's Robert E. Cook Honors College. The competition in India, known as MANage, includes six business categories along with other topics such as contemporary dance and painting. Twelve IUP students participated in the program, competing against more than 500 students from 30 Indian business schools.

—“Campus Notes,”
Reading (Pa.) Eagle, Nov. 28, 2010

Indiana University of Pennsylvania has carved out a virtual dig for its archaeology students in Second Life. Second Life is the popular online destination for people who want to socialize, play games or buy and sell stuff in an alternative world. But virtual worlds are also an educational tool whose potential is beginning to be tapped by projects such as IUP’s Archaeology Island in Second Life. Archaeology Island is the creation of Beverly Chiarulli, associate professor and director of IUP Archaelogical Services, and Scott Moore, associate professor of history.

—“IUP Website Takes Archaeology Class into a Virtual Dig,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Nov. 28, 2010

INDIANA - To fully appreciate the reach of China’s revving economy, look a world away at who’s showing up with suitcases at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Three years ago, 32 students from China were enrolled at IUP. By this fall, the number had more than tripled to 106. It’s a modest sum compared with the 1,638 Chinese students attending Penn State, up 38 percent in just one year, or enrollments of 789 and 782 Chinese students, respectively, at Pitt and Carnegie Mellon University. Both Pittsburgh schools saw double-digit gains this year. But the trend at IUP illustrates one reason why a national report shows China has become the top sender of college students to the United States. Experts say the flow of students from that country is permeating not only the major cities and campuses with the highest profiles abroad, but a much wider swath of schools. The surge also reflects intensifying efforts at recruiting by American schools including IUP, which has formed relationships with several universities in China. ‘If you’re asking me, I would say it’s a big part of our future,’ said Michele Petrucci, IUP’s assistant vice president for international education and global engagement.

—“Chinese Students Flooding Pa. Universities,”
Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, Nov. 26, 2010

Indiana University of Pennsylvania Financial Aid Director Patricia McCarthy said more parent are denied loans because of the weak economy, forcing students to borrow more themselves. Although the debt load of IUP’s graduates is about $1,800 under the state average, McCarthy hopes to expand upon financial-aid counseling during freshman orientation. ‘We’d like to show them what kind of starting salary could they expect so they can compare that to the type of debt they’re going to have after college,’ she said.

—“Pennsylvania College Grads’ Debt Tops US Average,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Nov. 21, 2010

Few understand this better than Nate Jacobs. It has been two months since the former West York Area High School standout — the leading receiver on the school’s 2008 District 3 Class AAA championship team -- suffered a concussion while playing for Indiana University of Pennsylvania. His playing career is almost certainly finished.  Nate’s struggle with concussions is hardly unique. But his story outlines the uncertainties of dealing with head injuries — and hints at how difficult their consequences can be to cope with.

—“Concussions a Hard-Hitting Issue for Athletes,”
York Daily Record/York Sunday News, Nov. 21, 2010

BELLEFONTE — Maybe it should have been done years ago - perhaps on a much larger stage, said master of ceremonies Charles Dumas. Timothy Cashwell, a student from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, portrays Union Civil War Pvt. Lewis Mills during a ceremony Sunday at Union Cemetery in Bellefonte to commemorate the 145th anniversary of the Grand Review of the Colored Troops.

—“Centre County’s Colored Troops Forgotten No Longer,”
Centre Daily Times (State College, Pa.), Nov. 15, 2010

When the exhibit ‘James Nestor: Elapsed’ opened a month ago at the Kipp Gallery on the campus of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, dozens of former students of Dr. James Nestor, some now art professors themselves, showed up to honor the man who, after 25 years of teaching art at IUP, will retire in mid-December. Nestor, 60, began teaching art at IUP in 1985, becoming full professor in 1997. He has taught legions of artists not only how to make art, but how to think, and more importantly how to question the world, like an artist.

—“Exhibit Looks Back on IUP Professor’s Career,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Nov. 14, 2010

To fully appreciate the reach of China's revving economy, look a world away at who’s showing up with suitcases at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Three years ago, 32 students from China were enrolled on the rural campus. By this fall, the number had more than tripled to 106. The surge also reflects intensifying efforts at recruiting by American schools including IUP, which has formed relationships with several universities in that country. ‘If you’re asking me, I would say it’s a big part of our future,’ said Michele Petrucci, IUP’s assistant vice president for international education and global engagement.

—“Chinese Students Flood Universities in the Region,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Nov. 15, 2010

In the world of Chester County sports, Ross ‘The Silver Fox’ Kershey set the gold standard. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Temple, Kershey went on to receive a teaching certification from Indiana University of Pennsylvania after working as a student teacher at Greensburg High School.

—“Ross Kershey,”
Philadelphia Daily Local News, Nov. 12, 2010

This past summer, there were six mosquito samples from Indiana County that tested positive for West Nile, the first time in several years the county had any positives. (Robert) Pollock said that during the summer, Thomas Merkel, an Indiana University of Pennsylvania intern with the virus control program, studied the effect that illegal dumping had on mosquitoes and the virus.

—“Water Funding Procured for Indiana County,”
Blairsville Dispatch/TribLive, Nov. 12, 2010

Helen Burns has been named chief nursing officer at Excela Health, the Greensburg-based hospital network announced Wednesday. Burns will direct all nursing activities with an emphasis on clinical quality. Her appointment is effective Jan. 3. Burns received a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

—“Helen Burns Named CNO at Excela,”
Pittsburgh Business Times, Nov. 10, 2010

Dr. Nestor — or simply ‘Nestor’ as his students reverentially address him — is retiring at the end of this term after a distinguished 25-year career at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Last week he took time to reflect upon cultural attitudes, art education and the roles of art and artists today, and his conclusions are a blend of circumspection and faith.

—“Retiring IUP Prof Has Molded Careers and Opinions on Art,”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Nov. 10, 2010

The decision of Philly native Bret Robinson, 27, to join the National Guard just ‘sort of came up one day.’ While a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, he remembers ‘looking at this banner that said: ‘Army National Guard, One Hundred Percent Tuition Paid Here.’ I got to thinking about my parents. They had been talking about when to retire. I thought to myself, if they can pay for school, how often does the National Guard get sent anywhere?’

—“Veterans Share Stories that Matter; Just Listen,”
Philadelphia Inquirer, Nov. 7, 2010

Students who attend PAMS and PAHS could have the opportunity to kick off a program that helps them no only get into better physical condition, but to learn to eat better, as well. Fuel Up to Play 60 is a proactive resposne to the growing obesity epidemic and declining physical fitness of America’s youth. The program is supported by the NFL, NDC, Department of Agriculture, IUP and many others, and is currently utilized by 60,000 schools across the country. The pilot program was held in State College and is tied in through IUP. ... To participate, the district must accept a dietetic intern from IUP...

—“School District Eyes Taking Part in NFL Wellness Program,”
Punxsutawney Spirit, Nov. 5, 2010

Kenn Marshall, spokesman for PASSHE, said California University of Pennsylvania was the first school in the system to begin replacing dorms about a decade ago. Since then, Slippery Rock, Kutztown and other schools within the state system have either replaced a portion of their dormitories or replaced them all. Marshall said a $250 million dorm replacement project at Indiana University of Pennsylvania was the biggest replacement project in the country at the time it was being completed.

—“Suite Life Headed for Shippensburg University,”
Chambersburg Public Opinion, Nov. 2, 2010

The Wilkinsburg School District is a no F-bomb zone. School district officials sent letters to parents last week, reminding them of its zero-tolerance policy barring foul language in classrooms and on campuses. Officials at school districts aren't imagining things; talk in schools -- and everywhere -- is getting dirtier, according to Ben Rafoth, an English professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Although movies, television and music often are suspects to blame for more swearing in daily speech, society generally has shifted toward informality and further from respect, particularly for authority, Rafoth said. "Five or six decades ago, profanity was common on the street, but you never heard it in the movies or on public airwaves," he said. "Today, we tolerate expressions of anger more, where just a few years ago it wasn't acceptable to vent. People have just become more tolerant of it."

—“Wilkinsburg tells parents it has no tolerance for bad language,”
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Nov. 1, 2010