Dr. Majid Karimi

  • Dr. KarimaWeyandt Hall, Room 335
    Indiana University of Pennsylvania
    Indiana, Pennsylvania. 15705
    724-357-2339

    karimi@iup.edu

    Education

    PhD Oklahoma University, Norman, OK, 1984, Computational Physics
    MS Oklahoma University, Norman, OK, 1980, Experimental Solid State Physics
    BS Azarbijan University, Tabriz, Iran, 1974

    Teaching

    Undergraduate and graduate levels

    Research

    My current research interests are in computational solid state and surface physics. In particular, I am interested in the atomistic simulation of materials, using the following methods: molecular dynamics (MD), molecular static (MS), Metropolis Monte-Carlo (MMC), Kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC), Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo (GCMC), and training of the Reactive Bond Order potentials.  Computer simulation is an exciting field which is in great demand both in the basic and applied scientific communities.  Computer simulation experiments are useful because ideas or models can be tested in a systematic way and information can be acquired in those cases in which experiments cannot be done. Computer simulations based on reliable model potentials can significantly extend our insight into the processes taking place in a solid or on a surface on an atomic scale.  As experimental/first-principles techniques continue to improve, so must theoretical simulations.  Emerging computer platforms offer an opportunity now for theory to narrow the gap with experiment.

     

    Active Research Projects for Interested Students:

    1. Training of the CHO ReaxFF reactive empirical potential.
    2. Formation of H2, O2, OH, and H2O molecules on Graphene using Eley-Rideal, and Langmuir Hinshelwood phenomena.
    3. Vacancy formation and migration energies on Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces.
    4. Adsorption of C60 molecules  on Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces.
    5. Tunneling of an atom through a continuous symmetric/asymmetric barrier.

    Most Recent Publications:

    Diffusion, adsorption, and desorption of molecular hydrogen on graphene and in graphite

    Justin Petucci, Carl LeBlond, Majid Karimi, and Gianfranco Vidali

    J. Chem. Phys. 139, 044706 (2013); 

    Corresponding Author Email:karimi@iup.edu

     

    Ordering and growth of rare gas films (Xe, Kr, Ar, and Ne) on the pseudo-ten-fold quasicrystalline approximant Al13Co4(100) surface 

    J Petucci1, M Karimi2, Y-T Huang3, S Curtarolo4 and R D Diehl3

    1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208, USA

    2 Department of Physics, Indiana University of PA, Indiana, PA 15705, USA

    3 Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA

    4 Department of Materials Science and Mechanical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708,USA

     

    J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 26 (2014) 095003

    Corresponding Author Email:karimi@iup.edu

     

    Molecular dynamics simulations of brittle fracture in fcc crystalline materials in the presence of defects

    Justin Petucci a, Carl LeBlond b, Majid Karimi c,⇑

    a Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208, USA

    b Department of Chemistry, Indiana University of PA, Indiana, PA 15705, USA

    c Department of Physics, Indiana University of PA, 975 Oakland Avenue, Weyandt Hall, Indiana, PA 15705, USA

     

    Computational Materials Science 86 (2014) 130–139

    Corresponding Author Email:karimi@iup.edu

    Recent Publications

    Molecular dynamics simulations of brittle fracture in fcc crystalline materials in the presence of defects

    Diffusion, adsorption, and desorption of molecular hydrogen on graphene and in graphite

    Ordering and growth of rare gas films (Xe, Kr, Ar, and Ne) on the pseudo-ten-fol quasicrystalline approximant Al13Co4(100) surface