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English Studies

The English Department’s Bachelor of Arts degree in English Studies reflects the diversity of subject matter, methods, and purposes of this vital, constantly evolving field. B.A. majors will have the opportunity to pursue the traditional concern of literary study—the careful analysis of canonized works—as well as encounter and analyze texts by members of traditionally marginalized groups and texts that are nontraditional or innovative in form and content. We encourage students to design their course of study so that they can be active and capable members of the global community and effective contributors to the multicultural workplace. To these ends, the department is committed to promoting and supporting an intellectual environment in which minority writers, nontraditional texts, and a variety of critical perspectives are an integral part of the curriculum.

53 credits of Liberal Studies courses are required of all B.A. majors (see the Undergraduate Catalog; pre-law majors have specific controlled electives). Since the B.A. major can be completed with 36 credits of coursework, students will have 25–31 credits outside of the Liberal Studies requirements to develop other interests, including a second major and a minor. In addition to creating these sorts of academic connections, we encourage our students to explore and enhance links between their scholarship and their professional goals by seeking an internship in their junior or senior year. Students should explore their options carefully with their advisors.

[Note: The following reflects the newly revised B.A. Program; majors previous to Fall 2009 have the option of staying with the previous program or pursuing the following curriculum. See “Frequently Asked Questions” and consult with your advisor. See “Old B.A. Program Checklist” under “Course Requirements” for graduation requirements.]

Note: See “Revised B.A. Program Checklist” under “Course Requirements” for complete graduation requirements.

After completing the introductory course in English Studies (ENGL 122), all B.A. majors will take a core of 15 credits: six credits of historical/regional literary survey courses; three credits of a writing course; three credits of a rhetoric, speech, or linguistics course; and three credits of an upper-level capstone course.

Required Core Courses: 15 credits

Two literary survey courses chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 210 British Literature to 1660
  • ENGL 211 British Literature 1660–1900
  • ENGL 212 American Literature to 1900
  • ENGL 213 British and American Literature to present
  • ENGL 226 Survey of Global Literature

One writing course chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 220 Advanced Composition
  • ENGL 221 Creative Writing
  • ENGL 222 Technical Writing

One language course chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 203 Introduction to Language Studies
  • ENGL 313 Rhetorical Trends and Traditions
  • ENGL 328 Introduction to Linguistics

Capstone course: ENGL 484 Topics in English Studies

In addition to these core courses,

  • Controlled Electives: six credits
  • Chosen from any ENGL-prefixed course with the exceptions of ENGL 101, 122, and 202

All BA majors will declare a Track of 15 credits, chosen from the following: Film Studies; Language Studies; Literary, Textual, and Cultural Studies; or Writing Studies.

English—Film Studies Track 

The Film Studies Track enables students to design a course of study in the history, meaning, function, and aesthetics of films of all genres and countries of origin. A student who completes the Film Studies Track will be able to recognize major developments in the history of film; apply the analytical skills and methods best suited to comprehend the significance and aesthetics of films; analyze the ways visual imagery interacts with audience, culture, medium, and ideology; and recognize and analyze the ways in which films communicate ideas about race, gender, sexual orientation, and identity. The Film Studies Track prepares students for any profession that requires strong analytic, cultural, and aesthetic skills and for academic study in cultural studies.

Track Courses: 15 credits

  • ENGL 208 Introduction to Film Studies

Four courses chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 332 Film Genres
  • ENGL 350 Gender and Sexual Orientation in Literature, Theory, and Film
  • ENGL 440 Major Figures in Film
  • ENGL 450 Film Theory
  • ENGL 460 Topics in Film
  • ENGL 463 Topics in Global Literature and Film

English—Language Studies Track 

The Language Studies Track enables students to design a course of study in language development, structure, and use. A student who completes the Language Studies Track will be able to identify and analyze the social and political applications of language used by and about speakers, writers, and subjects from both dominant and underrepresented linguistic communities; apply an increased language sensibility to personal, academic, social, and professional communication; and analyze specific discourse types and contexts. The Language Studies Track prepares students for any profession that requires strong analytic skills and for academic study in rhetoric and linguistics.

Track Courses: 15 credits
  • ENGL 203 Introduction to Language Studies

Four courses chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 313 Rhetorical Trends and Traditions
  • ENGL 321 Persuasive Speech and Writing
  • ENGL 328 Introduction to Linguistics
  • ENGL 330 The Structure of English
  • ENGL 333 Psycholinguistics
  • ENGL 336 Language, Gender, and Society
  • ENGL 426 ESL Methods and Materials

English—Literary, Textual, and Cultural Studies Track 

The Literary, Textual, and Cultural Studies Track enables students to design a course of study in the history, meaning, function, and aesthetics of texts of all kinds, especially literary texts. A student who completes the Literary, Textual, and Cultural Studies Track will be able to identify the unique material, symbolic, formal, and aesthetic qualities of texts of all kinds, especially literary texts; apply the analytical skills and methods best suited to comprehend the significance of texts; analyze the ways that texts of all kinds interact with audience, culture, medium and ideology; evaluate the role of theory—its methods, history, politics, and functions—in literary, textual, and cultural studies analysis; and examine the ways in which questions of race, gender, sexual orientation, and identity affect our interactions with both traditional and nontraditional literature and theory. The Literary, Textual, and Cultural Studies Track prepares students for any profession that requires strong analytic, communication, cultural, and aesthetic skills and for academic study in literary and cultural studies.

Track courses: 15 credits

  • ENGL 308 Critical Theory
  • Four courses chosen from the following:
  • ENGL 210 British Literature –1660
  • ENGL 211 British Literature 1660–1900
  • ENGL 212 American Literature –1900
  • ENGL 213 British and American Literature 1900–present
  • ENGL 225 Intro to Literature by Women
  • ENGL 226 Survey of Global Literature
  • ENGL 301 British Medieval Literature
  • ENGL 302 Renaissance Literature
  • ENGL 303 British Enlightenment Literature
  • ENGL 304 British Romantic Literature
  • ENGL 305 British Victorian Literature
  • ENGL 306 Modern British Literature
  • ENGL 307 Contemporary British Literature
  • ENGL 315 American Literature –1820
  • ENGL 316 American Literature 1820–1880
  • ENGL 317 American Literature 1880–1940
  • ENGL 319 American Literature –present
  • ENGL 335 Literary Nonfiction
  • ENGL 337 Myth
  • ENGL 338 Oral Literature
  • ENGL 340 The Novel
  • ENGL 341 Poetry
  • ENGL 342 Short Fiction
  • ENGL 343 Drama
  • ENGL 344 Ethnic-American Literature
  • ENGL 348 African-American Literature
  • ENGL 349 Bible as Literature
  • ENGL 350 Gender and Sexual Orientation in Literature, Theory, Film
  • ENGL 354 Classical Literature in Translation
  • ENGL 361 Environmental Literature
  • ENGL 385 Advanced Studies in Women’s Literature
  • ENGL 386 Regional Literature in English
  • ENGL 387 Irish Literature
  • ENGL 396 Literature of Emerging Nations
  • ENGL 398 Global Genres
  • ENGL 430 Major British Authors
  • ENGL 432 Chaucer
  • ENGL 434 Shakespeare
  • ENGL 437 Major Global Authors
  • ENGL 461 Topics in British Literature
  • ENGL 462 Topics in American Literature
  • ENGL 463 Topics in Global Literature and Film
  • ENGL 466 Topics in Theory

English—Writing Studies Track 

The Writing Studies Track enables students to design a course of study in the theory and practice of writing in a variety of genres. A student who completes the Writing Studies Track will be able to demonstrate skills in the analysis, construction, and presentation of texts; identify and apply productive, effective, and creative approaches to writing tasks for diverse audiences; and create a portfolio of writing for use in applying to graduate programs or for professional positions. The Writing Studies Track prepares students for any career that requires professional writing skills.

Track courses: 15 credits

Two Craft and Genre courses, chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 220 Advanced Composition
  • ENGL 221 Creative Writing
  • ENGL 222 Technical Writing
  • ENGL 325 Writing Poetry
  • ENGL 326 Writing Fiction
  • ENGL 327 Writing Creative Nonfiction
  • ENGL 421 Digital Writing

One Forms and Theories course, chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 308 Critical Theory
  • ENGL 335 Literary Nonfiction
  • ENGL 340 The Novel
  • ENGL 341 Poetry
  • ENGL 342 Short Fiction

Two Studio/Portfolio/Career Preparation courses, chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 360 Professional Writing, Editing, and Publishing
  • ENGL 420 Writers’ Studio
  • ENGL 483 Honors Thesis
  • ENGL 493 Internship

English Studies/Pre-Law Track 

The English Studies/Pre-Law Track enables students to design a course of study in the history and practice of persuasive communication, interpretation, and the cultural power of literary representation. A student who completes the Pre-Law Track will be able to identify, evaluate, and apply varied forms of analysis and argumentation; read, write, speak, and think in thoughtful, informed, persuasive fashion; and understand and distinguish the culturally and historically specific relationships among language, cultural power, and interpretation, both in terms of persuasive writing and speech and the literary representations of minorities. The Track should also enable students to do well on law school admissions essays and examinations in law school.

Track courses: 15 credits 

  • ENGL 265 Literature and the Law

Two courses in persuasion:

  • ENGL 313 Rhetorical Trends and Traditions
  • either ENGL 321 Persuasive Speaking and Writing or ENGL 310 Public Speaking

One writing course, chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 220 Advanced Composition
  • ENGL 221 Creative Writing
  • ENGL 222 Technical Writing
  • ENGL 325 Writing Poetry
  • ENGL 326 Writing Fiction
  • ENGL 327 Writing Creative Nonfiction
  • ENGL 360 Editing and Publishing

One course focusing on connections among language, cultural power, and interpretation, chosen from the following:

  • ENGL 308 Literary, Textual, and Cultural Studies Theory
  • ENGL 336 Language, Gender, and Society
  • ENGL 344 Ethnic American Literature
  • ENGL 348 African American Literature
  • ENGL 350 Gender/Sexual Orientation in Literature, Theory, Film
  • ENGL 385 Advanced Studies in Women’s Literature
  • ENGL 396 Literature of Emerging Nations
  • ENGL 466 Topics in Theory

Controlled Electives in Pre-Law Interdisciplinary

Track: 321 credits

Seven courses, including at least one from each of six areas:

Business:

  • ACCT 201
  • ACCT 202
  • BLAW 235

Criminology:

  • CRIM 210
  • CRIM 215
  • CRIM 255

Economics:

  • ECON 121
  • ECON 122
  • ECON 332

History:

  • HIST 320
  • HIST 321
  • HIST 346

Philosophy:

  • PHIL 101
  • PHIL 110
  • PHIL 222
  • PHIL 450

Political Science:

  • PLSC 358
  • PLSC 359
  • PLSC 361
  • English Department
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