Skip to Content - Skip to Navigation

Young Children, Ages 2-7

Brave Girls and Strong Women

A special collection of books from small publishers for ages 2–7


Minou, by Mindy Bingham
Fiction, ages 4-7. Minou is a pampered cat whose owner suddenly dies. Another female cat shows her how to take care of herself and even find a job. Beautiful full-color illustrations of Paris from a cat’s eye view. (Advocacy Press)

Princess Jessica Rescues a Prince, by Jennifer Brooks
Fiction, ages 4-7. Princess Jessica isn’t as beautiful as her sister Princess Edith, but she’s not afraid to rescue Prince Ryan from a sea serpent. With the help of encouraging words from three music boxes given to her by handicapped gnomes, she reunites the sea serpent with his lost lover. The happy serpent allows Prince Ryan to leave. Cute, colorful illustrations. (Nadja Publishing)

I’m Lost, by Elizabeth Crary
Self-help, ages 3-8. This is one title of a six-part "problem-solving" series. In this book Gabriela is lost at the zoo, and readers explore different solutions with her, from crying (which doesn’t work), to finding someone to ask for help (which does). Other titles (some of which feature girls) are: I Want It, I Want to Play, My Name is Not Dummy, I Can’t Wait, and Mommy, Don’t Go. (Parenting Press)

Watch Out for Clever Women, by Joe Hayes
Folktales, ages 5 and up. Five traditional Hispanic tales featuring clever women, including "The Day it Snowed Tortillas," about a woman who prevents robbers from claiming three gold bags her husband found, and "In the Days of King Adobe," in which an old woman tricks two rogues who try to steal her ham. English and Spanish on the same page. (Cinco Puntos Press)

Lena and the Whale, by Dierdre Kessler
Fiction, ages 5-8. Lena loves animals and has tended a crow and skunk back to health. But then she finds a baby whale on the beach. How can she save it? She gives a message to Rawkster, the crow she raised, to take to her parents. Her parents and neighbors arrive with a tarpaulin to ease the whale back into the water. A sweet book for animal lovers. (Ragweed Press)

Father Gander Nursery Rhymes: The Equal Rhymes Amendment, by Douglas Larche
Rhymes, ages 2-5. Non-sexist versions of Mother Goose rhymes. Jill and Jack both jump over the candlestick, and cooperation is emphasized. This book is an international best-seller. (Advocacy Press)

Frog Girl, by Paul Owen Lewis
Fiction, ages 6 and up. A Native American girl magically finds herself under a lake, in a frog town. There she learns about a volcano that is about to destroy her village. She is able to save her village by using knowledge from the frogs. Beautiful illustrations. (Tricycle Press)

Katherine and the Garbage Dump, by Martha Morris
Fiction, ages 4-7. One day everyone starts dumping trash in Katherine’s yard! To stop the mess, she talks to the garbage truck driver, then the Chief of Garbage, then the Superchief. Finally she decides to clean up the trash herself. Her neighbors help and a TV crew arrives to film the event. Soon after, Katherine is made mayor of the city! (Second Story Press)

The Paper Bag Princess, by Robert Munsch
Fiction, ages 4-7. Princess Elizabeth wears expensive clothes and plans to marry Prince Ronald. When a dragon burns up her castle and clothes and carries Ronald away, Elizabeth dons a paper bag to rescue him. She outwits the dragon and enters its lair, but Prince Ronald turns up his nose at her attire. She promptly leaves him to his fate. (Annick Press)

Stephanie’s Ponytail, by Robert Munsch
Fiction, ages 4-7. Stephanie wants a hairstyle like no one else has. First everyone says how ugly she is, then when she defends her hairstyle, everyone copies her. Stephanie’s hairstyles become more outrageous in her quest for individuality. Finally she threatens to shave her head — and guess what happens? (Annick Press)

Tatterhood and Other Tales, by Ethel Johnston Phelps
Folktales, ages 5 and up. Fun, absorbing tales featuring strong, brave, and/or clever girls and women. These are not made-up tales — they are actual folk tales from around the world that the author has discovered. A rich treasury for family reading. (Feminist Press)

The Princess and the Admiral, by Charlotte Pomerantz
Fiction, ages 6-10. Princess Mat Mat rules the Tiny Kingdom, which because of its poverty has never been invaded. But on the eve of 100 years of peace, twenty war ships are sighted. Despite a lack of weapons, Princess Mat Mat devises a plan to save the kingdom, and 100 years of peace are celebrated. (Feminist Press) Paperback $8.95.

Mother Scorpion Country, by Rohmer and Wilson
Folktale, ages 6 and up. In this tale from the Miskito Indians of Nicaragua, Naklili loves his wife Kati so much that when she dies, he follows her to Mother Scorpion Country, the land of the dead. Kati protects both of them from dangers along the way, and when Naklili realizes he doesn’t belong with Mother Scorpion, Kati sends him back to the living. Beautiful color pictures add to this memorable, slightly spooky story. English and Spanish text. (Children’s Book Press)

But God Remembered: Stories of Women from Creation to the Promised Land, by Sandy Sasso
Fiction, ages 4 to 8. This collection of stories about strong women in the Bible was written by a feminist Rabbi who searched through Biblical literature to find women whose stories are usually ignored. Includes tales of Lilith, Adam’s first wife; Serach, Jacob’s granddaughter; and Bityah, the woman who drew Moses from the water. (Jewish Lights Publishing)

A Prayer for the Earth, by Sandy Sasso
Fiction, ages 4 to 8. Noah saved all the animals on earth from destruction by the flood. But what about the plants? In this book we find out that Noah’s wife, Naamah, gathers seeds to save all the plants on earth. Written by the same feminist Rabbi as the above book. Beautiful color illustrations. (Jewish Lights Publishing)

The Woman Who Outshone the Sun, by Zubizaretta, Rohmer, and Schecter
Folktale, ages 6 and up. Lucia Zenteno arrives in a village and the animals and plants immediately love her. But the people are suspicious and drive her away. When she leaves, the village’s river goes with her. Humbled, the people ask her forgiveness. She returns the river and reminds the villagers to treat even strangers with kindness. Color pictures, English and Spanish text. (Children’s Book Press)

  • Women’s Studies Program
  • Stabley Library, Room 103
    429 South Eleventh Street
    Indiana, PA 15705
  • Phone: 724-357-4753
  • Fax: 724-357-2281
  • Office Hours
  • Monday through Friday
  • 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.