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David Hanauer

Professor of English

Office: 215D Leonard Hall
Phone: 724-357-2274
E-mail: Hanauer@iup.edu
Website

Education

Ph.D., Bar Ilan University, 1994

Academic Interests

First and Second Language Literacy, Literature, Second Language Teaching

Overview of Research

David Ian Hanauer’s research employs theoretical, qualitative and quantitative methods and focuses on the connections between reading authentic texts and social functions in first and second languages. Among other issues, his research has investigated the genre specific aspects of poetry reading in L1 and L2, cognitive aspects of literary education, cross-cultural understandings of fable reading and academic literacy across disciplines. His articles have been published in Science, Applied Linguistics, Discourse Processes, TESOL Quarterly, Canadian Modern Language Review, Research in the Teaching of English, Teaching and Teacher Education, Language Awareness, Cognitive Linguistics, The Arts in Psychotherapy, Poetics, and Poetics Today. He is the author of three recent books: Scientific Discourse: Multiliteracy in the Classroom, Poetry and the Meaning of Life, and The Balanced Approach to Reading Instruction. In 2003, Dr. Hanauer functioned as the special editor of the Canadian Modern Language Review for a special issue addressing the relationship between literature and applied linguistics.

Over the last four years, Dr. Hanauer has received $200,000 in research funding from the National Science Foundation and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute for research on the connections between literacy (multiliteracy) and science. His work for the years 2003–2005 was funded by the NSF and conducted in conjunction with the University of California at Berkeley. That project consisted of an in-depth description of hands-on science in an elementary science classroom and culminated in the publication of a recent research book entitled Scientific Discourse: Multiliteracy in the Classroom. Since 2005, he has a joint research project with Prof. Graham Hatfull of the Bacteriophage Institute of Pittsburgh, situated in the University of Pittsburgh and funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professorship Program. His work is conducted in the Hatfull Bacteriophage laboratory and consists of qualitatively describing and assessing the PHIRE (Phage Hunting Integrating Research and Education) Program. This work recently culminated in the publication of a co-authored article in the prestigious journal Science which was entitled “Teaching Scientific Inquiry.” Currently, Dr. Hanauer is working on a new book dealing with the assessment of scientific inquiry and summarizing work conducted within the PHIRE program.

Publications

  • Hanauer, D. (2003). The Balanced Approach to Reading Instruction. Tel-Aviv, Israel: Sifriat HaPoalim
  • Hanauer, D. (2004). Poetry and the Meaning of Life. Toronto, CA: Pippin Press
  • Hanauer, D. (2006). Scientific Discourse: Multiliteracy in the Classroom. London, UK: Continuum Press

Funded Research Reports

  • Hanauer, D (2005). The Multiliteracy Tasks of Hands-On Science: A Qualitative Study of a Second Grade Classroom Implementation of the Sandy Shores Science Unit. National Science Foundation Report submitted to the Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley May 2005
  • Hanauer, D. (2005). Media Development in Israel: 1950-2000. European Union Research Grant. Report Present to the Institute for Media Studies at the University of Seigen, Germany July 2005
  • Hanauer, D. (2006). Modeling the Phage Hunting Program: Assessment in the Educational Outreach Program of a Microbiology Laboratory. Howard Hughes Medical Institute Report submitted to the Bacteriophage Institute of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, May 2006
  • Hanauer, D. (2007). Assessing Undergraduate the Phage Hunting Program: Assessment in the Educational Outreach Program of a Microbiology Laboratory. Howard Hughes Medical Institute Report submitted to the Bacteriophage Institute of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, August 2007

Articles

  • Hanauer, D., Jacobs-Sera, D., Pedulla, M., Cresawn, S., Hendrix, R., & Hatfull, G. (2006) Teaching scientific inquiry. Science, 314, 1880-1881.
  • Newman, M., & Hanauer, D. (2005) The NCATE/TESOL Teacher education standards: A critical review. TESOL Quarterly, 39(4), 753-764.
  • Hanauer, D., & Newman, M. (2005) TESOL/NCATE Teacher education standards: Why they don’t work and how to fix them. Idiom, 35 (3), 10.
  • Hanauer, D. (2004) Silence, voice and erasure: Psychological embodiment in graffiti at the site of Prime Minister Rabin’s assassination. The Arts in Psychotherapy 31, 29-35.
  • Hanauer, D. (2003) Multicultural moments in Poetry: The importance of the unique. Canadian Modern Language Review, 60 (1), 27-54
  • Hanauer, D. (2003) Literature and Applied Linguistics: New perspectives. Canadian Modern Language Review, 60 (1), 1-6.
  • Elster, C., & Hanauer, D. (2002) Voicing Texts, Voices around Texts: Reading poems in elementary school classrooms. Research in the Teaching of English, 37 (1), 89-134.
  • Hanauer, D. (2001a) The task of poetry reading and second language learning. Applied Linguistics 22(3), 295-323.
  • Hanauer, D. (2001b) Focus-on-cultural understanding: Literary reading in the second language classroom. CAUCE: A Journal of Philology and Pedagogy 24, 389-404.
  • Hanauer, D. (2001c) The New Critical method revisited. Frame 15 (1), 12-37.
  • Hanauer,.D., & Waksman, S. (2000a). The role of explicit moral points in fable reading. Discourse Processes 30 (2), 107-132.
  • Hanauer, D. (1999). Attention and literary education. Language Awareness, 8, 1-15.
  • Ravid, D., & Hanauer, D. (1998). A prototype theory of rhyme. Cognitive Linguistics, 9 (1), 79-106
  • Hanauer, D. (1998c). The genre-specific hypothesis of reading: Reading poetry and reading encyclopedic items. Poetics 26 (2), 63-80
  • Hanauer, D. (1998b). The effect of three literary educational methods on the development of genre knowledge: The case of postmodern poetry. Journal of Literary Semantics, 27 (1), 43-57.
  • Hanauer, D. (1998a). Reading poetry: An empirical investigation of Formalist, Stylistic and Conventionalist Claims. Poetics Today 19, 565-580.
  • Hanauer, D. (1997d). Reading literature and the world of multi-literacies The place and function of literature in the next millennium. SPIEL.16, 152-155.
  • Hanauer, D. (1997c). Poetic text processing. Journal of Literary Semantics 26 (3), 157-172.
  • Hanauer, D. (1997b). Student teacher's knowledge of literacy practices in school. Teaching and Teacher Education 13 (8), 847-862.
  • Hanauer, D. (1997a). Poetry reading in the second language classroom. Language Awareness, 6 (1), 2-16.
  • Hanauer, D. (1996b). Academic literary competence testing. Journal of Literary Semantics, 25 (2), 142-153.
  • Hanauer, D. (1996a). Integration of phonetic and graphic features in poetic text categorization judgments. Poetics, 23, 363-380.
  • Hanauer, D. (1995a). Literary and poetic text categorization judgments. Journal of Literary Semantics, 24 (3), 187-210.
  • Gordon, C.M., & Hanauer, D. (1995). The interaction between task and meaning construction in EFL reading comprehension tests. Tesol Quarterly, 29 (2), 299-324.

Forthcoming Chapters in Books

  • Hanauer, D. (in press). Non-place identity: Britain’s response to migration in the age of supermodernity. In G. Delanty, P. Jones and R. Wodak (Eds.), Migrant Voices: Discourses of Belonging and Exclusion. Liverpool, UK: Liverpool University Press
  • Hanauer, D. (in press). Science and the Linguistic Landscape: A Genre Analysis of Representational Wall Space in a Microbiology Laboratory. In E. Shohamy and D. Gorter (Eds.), Linguistic Landscape. Routledge.

Chapters in Books

  • Hanauer, D. (2007a). Attention directed literary education: An empirical investigation. In S. Zyngier & G. Watson (Eds.), Literature and Stylistics for Language Learners: London, UK: Palgrave McMillan
  • Hanauer, D. (2007b). Poetry reading and group discussion in elementary school. In R. Horowitz (Ed.), Talking Texts: How Speech and Writing Interact in School Learning. Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Hanauer, D. (2001).What do we know about poetry reading: Theoretical positions and empirical research. In G.Steen and D.Schram (Eds.). The Psychology and Sociology of Literary Text. Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing Co.
  • Hanauer, D. (2000b). Narrative, multiculturalism and migrants: A proposal for a literacy policy. In D. Schram, J. Hakemulder, & A. Raukema (Eds.), Promoting Reading in a Multicultural Society. Utrecht, Netherlands: Stichting Lezen.
  • Hanauer, D. (1999b). A genre approach to graffiti at the site of Prime Minister Rabin’s assassination. In D. Zissenzwein and D. Schers (Eds.), Present and Future: Jewish Culture, Identity and Language. Tel-Aviv: Tel-Aviv University Press.
  • Hanauer, D. (1998d). Contextualizing basic reading processes: Graphic form and surface information recall in poetic texts. In Z.Shavit (Ed.), Literacy Now and in the Next Century. Jerusalem: Caspit Press
  • Hanauer, D. (1997f). Reading poetry and surface information recall. In S. Totosy de Zepetnek (Ed.), The Systematic and Empirical Approach to Literature and Culture as Theory and Application. Seigen, Germany: LUMIS Publications.
  • Hanauer, D. (1995b). The effects of educational background on literary and poetic text categorization judgments. In G. Rusch (Ed.), Empirical Approaches to Literature. Siegen, Germany: LUMIS Publications.

Encyclopedia Items

  • Hanauer, D. (2005). Ruth Wodak. The Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd Edition. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier.

Book Reviews

  • Hanauer, D. (2004) – Journal of Language and Society 34 (2): 300-302 Theorizing Bi(multi)literacy: A Review of “A Continua of Biliteracy: An Ecological Framework.” Hornberger, N. (2003) Continua of Biliteracy: An Ecological Framework for Educational Policy, Research, and Practice in Multilingual Settings. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.
  • Hanauer, D. (2003) – Canadian Modern Language Review 60 (2): 224-226 Cranshaw, R. & Tusting, K. (2000) Exploring French Text Analysis – Interpretations of National Identity. London and New York, Routledge.

Papers Presented at Scientific Meetings

  • 2007 Cross-Modal Literacy Development: A Qualitative Investigation of Scientific Inquiry Tasks in an Elementary Classroom. AAAL (American Association of Applied Linguists) Conference, Costa Mesa, California, US
  • 2007 Migrant Cityscaping: A Visual Essay of the Linguistic Landscape in Markham in the Greater Toronto Area. (In conjunction with Ms. Rebecca Garvin). Pennsylvania Canadian Studies Consortuim, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, USA.
  • 2007 Culture in the Age of Supermodernity: The Requirement for Pedagogical Change. Plenary Speaker, VIII Congreso Estatal de Idiomas, Universidad Autonoma De Baja California, Ensenada, Mexico
  • 2007 Researcher or test tube cleaner: Assessment in the PHIRE program. Bacteriophage Institute of Pittsburgh Seminar, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA.
  • 2006 Multiliteracy in the elementary science inquiry classroom: Towards a definition of pedagogical scientific discourse. AAAL (American Association of Applied Linguists) Conference, Montreal, Canada
  • 2006 Non-place identity: Culture as literacy. CCCC (College Composition and Communication) Conference, Chicago, USA.
  • 2006 Teaching culture in the age of supermodernity. Plenary Speaker, ETAI (English Teachers Association of Israel) Winter Conference, Beer Sheva, Israel.
  • 2005 The multiliteracy tasks of science education. The First Annual Conference of Seeds of Science/Roots of Literacy Science Education. UC Berkeley, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA.
  • 2005 Post process research methodology: Multiliteracy in the elementary science Classroom. SCIPT (International Research on Literacy) Conference, Haifa, Israel
  • 2005 Poetry and the meaning of life. ETAI (English Teachers Association of Israel) Conference, Haifa, Israel
  • 2005 The problem of evaluating and applying knowledge. TESOL (Teachers of English as a Second Language) Conference, San Antonion, USA
  • 2005 The myths of method: A hermeneutic critique of standardized literacy tests. CCCC (College Composition and Communication) Conference, San Francisco, USA
  • 2004 The process of writing poetry. AAAL (American Association of Applied Linguistics) Conference, Portland, Oregon, USA
  • 2002 Defining L2 reading: Applying poetry to applied linguistics. AAAL (American Association of Applied Linguistics) Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
  • 2001 Reading parables: Culturally specific designs for meaning making. AAAL (American Association of Applied Linguists) Conference, St. Louis, USA
  • 2000 Socially embedded text: Graffiti at the site of Prime Minister Rabin’s assassination. AAAL (American Association of Applied Linguists) Conference, Vancouver, Canada
  • 2000 Multiculturalism, Literacy and Migrants. Reading and Reading Promotion in a Multicultural Society. Stichting Lezen, Utrecht, Netherlands.
  • 1999 What we know about reading poetry. NRC (National Reading Conference) Orlando: Florida, U.S.A.
  • 1999 Pre-service teachers' knowledge of academic literacy practices. AAAL (American Association of Applied Linguists) Conference, Stamford: CT, U.S.A.
  • 1999 Restricting interpretive range: Genre-specific aspects of fable reading. Invited Lecture, University of Toronto/IOSE, Toronto, Canada
  • 1998 Genre-specific aspects of reading poetry and stories. NRC (National Reading) Conference, Austin: TX, U.S.A. (with C. Elster).
  • 1998 The genre-specific hypothesis of reading: The processing of poetry and encyclopedic Items. AAAL (American Association of Applied Linguist) Conference, Seattle, U.S.A.
  • 1998 Poetry reading and second language learning. TESOL (Teachers of English as a Second Language) Conference, Seattle, U.S.A.
  • 1997 Contextualizing basic reading processes: Graphic form and surface information recall in poetic texts. The Bi-Annual Conference for Encouraging Reading, Jerusalem, Israel
  • 1997 The system of attention and literary knowledge development. 2nd IALS (International Association of Literary Stylistics) Conference, Freiburg, Germany.
  • 1997 The genre-specific aspects of expository text. Symposium on Literacy Development for the Spencer Foundation. Tel Aviv, Israel
  • 1996 Literary education as discourse community. AAAL (American Association of Applied Linguistics) Conference, Chicago, USA
  • 1996 Surface information recall: The genre-specific hypothesis. 5th IGEL (Empirical Study of Literature) Conference, Banff, Canada
  • 1996 The genre-specific hypothesis of poetry reading. SCRIPT (Special Committee for Research in Processing of Texts) Conference, Maale HaHamisha, Israel
  • 1995 Does a picture tell a story: The effect of three information presentation methods on two sub-groups of Israeli five-year olds. AERA Conference, San Francisco, USA (with D. Ravid)
  • 1995 The effect of three information presentation methods on the language comprehension and production of advantaged and disadvantaged five-year olds. SCRIPT (Special Committee for Research in Processing of Texts) Conference, Maale HaHamisha, Israel (with D. Ravid)
  • 1994 The effects of educational background on literary and poetic text categorization judgements. 4th IGEL (Empirical Study of Literature) Conference, Budapest, Hungary.
  • 1994 The construction of textual hierarchies in expository texts: A comparison of two processing models. SCRIPT (Special Committee for Research in Processing of Texts) Conference, Maale HaHamisha, Israel
  • 1993 Test answers as indicators of mental model construction. AILA Conference, Arnheim, Holland (with C. Gordon)
  • 1992 Empirical literary education. 3rd IGEL (Empirical Study of Literature) Conference, Memphis: TN, U.S.A.
  • 1992 Academic literary competence testing. lst IALS (International Association of Literary Stylistics) Conference, Canterbury, Kent, United Kingdom
  • English Department
  • Leonard Hall, Room 110
    421 North Walk
    Indiana, PA 15705-1094
  • Phone: 724-357-2261
  • Fax: 724-357-2265
  • Office Hours
  • Monday through Friday
  • 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • 1:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.