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B.A. in Economics, Mathematics

The B.A. in Economics/Mathematics degree provides students with a wide variety of career options. Students find a strong demand for their services in such diverse areas as finance, business research, education, management, and public policy analysis. It is an excellent degree for students who wish to pursue a career as an actuary. Many pursue graduate degrees in fields such as economics, operations research, public policy, law and business.

Do you need more convincing?

The Questions....

I love the challenge of math, but I care deeply about social issues as well. Is there a field that combines both?

Math excites me, but I want to apply it to “real” problems. What should I choose as a college major?

The Answer....

An Economics/Mathematics major at Indiana University of Pennsylvania!

Why Mathematics/Economics?

  • If Congress chops $150 billion of government spending to balance the budget, will the economy boom? Or, will the spending cuts force firms to lay off workers and send us into a recession?
  • If Nike boosts shoe prices by 5 percent, will consumers run to Reebok? How many? Will Nike profits rise or fall?
  • What is the most cost-effective way of cleaning the environment? Must a guarantee of basic medical care for all citizens break the bank? Do harsher prison sentences deter criminal activity?
  • If Pizza Hut wants to grab more business, should it open new restaurants? Expand its menu? Lower prices?

Answers to such questions require solid grounding in both economics and mathematics. Economists model the way people behave: the way we respond to financial and non-financial incentives. Economic theories frame the issues, but mathematics provides the tools. Which economic theories work? We need data and statistical tools to tell us. Which policy options are the best? We need mathematical tools to measure costs and benefits.

Career Opportunities

Students with a joint background in mathematics and economics face a wide variety of career options. Many pursue graduate degrees in fields such as economics, operations research, public policy, law, and business. They find a strong demand for their services in such diverse areas as finance, business research, education, management, and public policy analysis.

The B.A. in Economics/Mathematics is administed jointly with the Economics Department. Students can major in Economics/Mathematics either through the Economics Department in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences or through the Mathematics Department in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. The degree requirements in either case are identical. The only difference is the home department of the student's primary academic advisor.

Bachelor of Arts–Economics/Mathematics

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section with the following specifications:

Mathematics: MATH 125

Social Science: ECON 121

Liberal Studies Electives: 9cr, no courses with ECON or MATH prefix

53

 

Major:

48-49

Core:

ECON 122

Principles of Microeconomics

3cr

 

ECON 421

Macroeconomic Analysis

3cr

 

ECON 422

Microeconomic Analysis

3cr

 

MATH 126

Calculus II/Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

3cr

 

MATH 171

Introduction to Linear Algebra

3cr

 

MATH 216 or 

ECON 355

Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences or

Statistics for Economists

3cr

 

MATH 225

Calculus III/Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics

3cr  

Economics Electives: (1, 2)

12cr

 

Students are especially encouraged to take ECON 334 and 356, but any
course except ECON 101 may be used.

Mathematics Electives:

15-16cr

 

At least one of the following two-semester sequences:

MATH 241 and 371, MATH 363 and 364, or MATH 445 and 446

Three additional courses either from the above or from the following:

MATH 271, 272, 342, 417 or 418 (but not both), 421, 422, 423, 425, 427, 451, 465, 476, 477

 

Other Requirements: College:

0-6

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (3)

 

Free Electives: 

12-19

 

Total Degree Requirements: 

120

 

  1. No more than 6cr of internship credit may be applied toward major.
  2. No more than one ECON Controlled Elective may be a 200-level course.
  3. Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal Studies electives.
  • Mathematics Department
  • Stright Hall, Room 233
    210 South Tenth Street
    Indiana, PA 15705
  • Phone: 724-357-2608
  • Fax: 724-357-7908
  • Office Hours
  • Monday through Friday
  • 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • 1:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.