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Writing for Facebook

Once you understand how to set up your page and what tools are available, you should consider how to write for your Facebook Page.

How Much is Too Much

The best practice for posting on Facebook is to limit the number of posts to about one per day. Unlike Twitter, too much posting can actually hurt your organization in the long run. Users typically don’t like to see their news feed flooded with redundant or excessive posts.

Don’t Write Headlines

When writing for Facebook, Twitter, etc., you want to write conversationally while maintaining a professional demeanor. What exactly does that mean? Here’s an example:

Good: The IUP Alumni Association, with cooperation from alumni who’ve created IUP-related LinkedIn groups, is consolidating all current alumni groups on LinkedIn to create one extensive career network. Join today

Not so good: IUP Alumni Association to consolidate all current alumni LinkedIn groups.

Punctuation

It might be exciting news, but go easy on the punctuation.

Have a big event coming up? Want to add a little extra something to that post to gather excitement from your audience? Might as well just tack on an exclamation point at the end, right? Not necessarily.

While adding exclamation points, or beginning a post with questions, does help pull the reader in, if you use either punctuation mark too often it doesn’t have the same effect after awhile. Don’t give up the variety all together, though—a variety will keep your readers coming back.

Dates

When including dates with a post, hold off on adding an “nd” or “th.” Here’s an example:

Good: July 15

Good: July 15, 2011

Not so good: July 15th

Time

Including a time element in your post is important, and it is important to communicate it in the most understandable manner. You want to include the exact time (with minutes) if possible. Here’s an example:

Good: 8 p.m.

Good: 8:05 p.m.

Not so good: 8 PM – 8 Oclock – 8 pm

Not so good: 12 noon (write either 12 p.m. or noon)