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Undergraduate Level Courses

PHYS 100 Prelude to Physics

Credits: 3.00

Prepares students for their first course in quantitative physics by reviewing fundamental concepts involving measurement and error, graphing, motion, and applications of Newton's Laws in developing problem-solving skills. Also presents a historical perspective as well as introduces the many opportunities that exist for those with a background in physics.

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or equivalent high school preparation

PHYS 101 Energy and Our Environment

Credits: 3.00

An overview of the areas of energy, transportation, and pollution. These topics are approached via the relevant concepts of physical science and physics. A nonlaboratory course for Liberal Studies requirements.

PHYS 105 Physics of Light and Sound

Credits: 3.00

The study of light and sound as applied in the production of objects of art and the production of music. Includes the study of vision, light in nature, photography, and artistic media and the study of hearing, musical sound, musical instruments, and room acoustics.

PHYS 111 Physics I Lecture

Credits: 3.00

General college physics; mechanics, wave motion, and sound.

Prerequisites: Elementary algebra and trigonometry

PHYS 112 Physics II Lecture

Credits: 3.00

Electricity and magnetism, heat, light, atomic and nuclear physics, and an elementary introduction to relativity and quantum theory.

Prerequisites: PHYS 111

PHYS 115 Physics I for Electro-Optics

Credits: 3.00

Introduces the mechanical univers through the study of the motion of matter and waves and the causes of waves. The learning of quantitative problem solving skills is emphasized. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisites: PHYS 100; MATH 110 or MATH 121

PHYS 116 Physics II for Electro-Optics

Credits: 3.00

By applying Newton's Laws of Motion to atoms and molecules, introduces the basic principles of and connections between temperature, heat, and molecular motion at a fundamental level. Concepts involved in fluid flow, electric charge, and the origin of magnetism are covered. The fundamental basis for the existence of electric and magnetic fields and the generation of electromagnetic energy as waves are explored. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisites: PHYS 115

PHY 121 Physics I Lab

Credits: 1.00

Physics laboratory at level of Physics I; exercises in mechanics, wave motion, and sound.

Corequisite: PHYS 111

PHYS 122 Physics II Lab

Credits: 1.00

Physics laboratory at level of Physics II; exercises in optics, electricity and magnetism, radioactivity.

Corequisite: PHYS 112

PHYS 131 Physics I-Calc Lecture

Credits: 3.00

A calculus-based course in general college physics; topics covered are similar to those covered in Physics 111 but are treated in more depth through the use of calculus.

Prerequisite: MATH 121 or MATH 125, at least concurrently

PHYS 132 Physics-I Calc Lecture

A continuation of Physics I-Calc; topics covered are similar to those covered in Physics 112 but are treated in more depth through the use of calculus.

Prerequisite: MATH 122 or MATH 126, at least concurrently

PHYS 141 Physics I-Calc Lab

Credits: 1.00

Physics laboratory at same level as Physics I-Calc Lecture; exercises in mechanics, wave motion, and sound.

Corequisite: PHYS 131

PHYS 142 Physics II-Calc Lab

Credits: 1.00

Physics laboratory at same level as Physics II-Calc Lecture; exercises in optics, electricity and magnetism, and radioactivity.

Corequisite: PHYS 132

PHYS 151 Medical Physics - Lecture

Credits: 3.00

Development of concepts and principles of physics with a strong emphasis as to their use and application in medical and other biophysical areas.

PHYS 161 Medical Physics - Lab

Credits: 1.00

Experiments dealing with applications of physical principles to the field of medicine. Practical experience with use of electronic equipment, chart recorders, etc., f type found in modern-day medicine will be introduced.

Corequisite: PHYS 151

PHYS 231 Electronics

Credits: 4.00

Circuit theory, transients, transistor circuits, frequency response, input and output impedance, feedback, and electronic noise. Operational amplifiers and digital electronics.

PHYS 281 Special Topic

Credits: 3.00

Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.

Prerequisites: As appropriate to course content.

PHYS 299 Cooperative Education I

Credits: 3.00

Blends classroom theory with practical application through job-related experience. Students work in positions offered by the participating industrial or federal/state work-study program employers under joint supervision of the Physics faculty and the on-site supervisor. The participant must be a full-time IUP student in good academic standing and be planning to return to campus for  completion of his/her degree program. Evaluation requirements may include on-site visitations by the faculty/coordinator, consultation with the on-site supervisor, and a major progress report by the student or the presentation of a detailed oral report before the departmental cooperative education committee.

Prerequisites: PHYS 132; completion of 30 credits with a minimum 2.0 GPA and approval of the cooperative education coordinator.

PHYS 331 Modern Physics

Credits: 3.00

The history of modern physics is covered. Particle and wave properties of matter are explored using the ideas of quantum and classical mechanics are atomic structure, solid state, and nuclear physics. The special theory of relativity will also be covered. Some of the problems are solved using computers.

Prerequisites: PHYS 112 or PHYS 116 or PHYS 132; MATH 122 or MATH 126

PHYS 342 Thermal and Statistical Physics

Credits: 3.00

Thermometry, laws of thermodynamics, low-temperature physics, entropy, properties of ideal gas, and an introduction to statistical mechanics.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 or MATH 126; PHYS 112 or PHYS 132

PHYS 345 Optics

Credits: 3.00

Geometrical optics and physical optics, including interference, diffraction, and polarization. Quantum optics is introduced.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 or MATH 126; PHYS 112 or PHYS 132

PHYS 350 Intermediate Experimental Physics I

Credits: 3.00

Performs required fundamental experiments in areas of mechanics, optics, modern physics, and heat. Speaking before other classmates and faculty and competence in writing scientific papers and reports are emphasized. Effectiveness in the collection of data is important. Computers will often be utilized to perform data taking and analysis.

Prerequisites: PHYS 331; PHYS 342 or EOPT 120

PHYS 351 Intermediate Experimental Physics II

Credits: 3.00

Increasingly sophisticated experiments in essential areas of physics. Digital computers and the Van de Graaff are available.

Prerequisites: PHYS 350

PHYS 352 Applied Physics Laboratory

Credits: 3.00

An introduction to much of the fundamental equipment used in industry. Trains students in the operation and proper use of this equipment through a series of experiments that teach signal dection and analysis including data acquisiton by computer. Provides instruction on the proper methods to be used for various oral and written presentations.

Prerequisites: PHYS 231, PHYS 355 or instructor permission

PHYS 353 Solid State Electronics Laboratory

Credits: 3.00

Encounters a number of areas of current interest in semiconductor technology. Student performs experiments and learns skills in such areas as device process simulation, device simulation, measurements of semiconductor materials, and measurement of device parameters. Also covers proper presentation of written and oral reports.

Prerequisites: PHYS 352 or instructor permission

PHYS 355 Computer Interfacing

Credits: 3.00

Teaches the fundamentals of interfacing the personal computer to its physical surroundings. Teaches how to collect data and to control experiments in real time. Shows how to use digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) techniques and analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) techniques. A graphical software package (such as LabVIEW) is also used to design icon-based interfacing tools, to learn how to use virtual instruments, and to analyze data.

Prerequisites: COSC 110

PHYS 399 Cooperative Education II

Credits: 3.00

A second course in cooperative education. Includes instruction that builds upon learning experiences in college by combining and correlating them with learning experiences at the training station to meet the student's career goals. Evaluation requirements may include on-site visitations by the faculty/coordinator, consultation with the on-site supervisor, and a major progress report by the student or the presentation of a detailed oral report before the departmental cooperative education committee. No more than 3 credits of PHYS 299, 399, and/or 493 may be used to fulfill Physics major course requirements.

Prerequisites: PHYS 299; PHYS 350; completion of 80 credits with a minimum 2.5 GPA and approval of the cooperative education coordinator

PHYS 401 Theoretical Physics

Credits: 3.00

Explores the applied mathematics necessary to solve ordinary and partial differential equations in closed and series forms for boundary value problems in intermediate and advanced physics. Coordinate transformations, tensor analysis, special functions, and series involving complex variables and integral transforms are also considered.

Prerequisites: PHYS 131; PHYS 132; MATH 125; MATH 126

PHYS 432 Advanced Electronics

Credits: 3.00

Digital measurement, switching circuits, logic circuits, counting, coding, input and output, AD and DA converters, computer organization.

Prerequisites: PHYS 231

PHYS 441 Classical Mechanics

Credits: 3.00

Covers vectors, generalized coordinates, and coordinate-transformations to study the mechanics of a particle and a system of particles in one, two, and three dimensions. Central forces, planetary, and satellite motion, rotation, oscillations, and conservation laws in the Newtonian formulation of classical mechanics are included and used to solve dynamical problems for various mechanical systems.

Prerequisites: PHYS 131; PHYS 132; MATH 125; MATH 126; MATH 241 or department permission

PHYS 451 Electricity and Magnetism

Credits: 3.00

Treats elements of vector analysis, electrostatics, special techniques for finding electric potential, electric field in matter, magnetostatics, magnetic field in matter, electrodynamics, Maxwell's equiations, and electromagnetic waves at the calculus level.

Prerequisites: PHYS 131; PHYS 132; MATH 125; MATH 126; PHYS 441 or department permission

PHYS 461 Quantum Mechanics I

Credits: 3.00

Quantum mechanics following methods of Schrodinger and Heisenberg; application to harmonic oscillator; three-dimensional Schrodinger equation; hydrogen atom; electron in a magnetic field- normal and anomalous Zeeman effect; spin. (Used to be offered as PHYS 473 prior to 2010-2011.)

Prerequisites: PHYS 331; MATH 241

PHYS 472 Nuclear Physics

Credits: 3.00

A survey of nuclear physics, nuclear size, muclear mass, reaction theory, types of radioactive decay, nuclear models, nuclear forces, and elementary particles.

Prerequisites: PHYS 331

PHYS 475 Physics of Semiconductor Devices I

Credits: 3.00

Develops the basic foundation for a study of the theory of semiconductors. Elementary quantum concepts, the band theory of solids, electrical properties of solids, electrical properties of solids, effective mass theory, and principles of semiconductor devices are discussed.

Prerequisites: PHYS 231; PHYS 342; or instructor permission

PHYS 476 Physics of Semiconductor Devices II

Credits: 3.00

Discusses the physics and operation of a number of discrete devices including bipolar transistors, MOSFETS, JFETS, CCDs, various diode technologies, photovoltaic and photoconductive devices, sold-state lasers, and light-emitting diodes.

Prerequisites: PHYS 475 or instructor permission

PHYS 480 Seminar

Credits: 1.00

Speakers from within and outside the university conduct a seminar on a weekly or bi-weekly basis on different topics of interest in the physics community.

PHYS 481 Special Topics in Physics

Credits: 3.00

Varies from semester to semester and covers diverse topics in specific areas of physics. This course number is also used to offer courses under development.

Prerequisites: As appropriate to course content

PHYS 482 Independent Study in Physics

Credits: 6.00

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjuction with a faculty member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources. Work is supervised by a Physics faculty member but does not neccessarily inolve regular lecture or laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Provost's Office.

PHYS 490 Solid-State Physics

Credits: 3.00

Reciprocal lattice, crystal structure, the quantization of fields to produce quasi-particles such as phonons, magnons, excitons. Fermi gas of electrons, energy bands, semiconductor cyrstals, and photoconductivity.

Prerequisites: PHYS 223; PHYS 331

PHYS 493 Internship in Physics

Credits: 3.00

A supervised professional work-experience n physics and applied physics. Location, duties, internship, and hours are individually tailored to the student's career goals. A mazimum of 3 credits of intership in the student's major may be applied toward the physics major area elective requirements. Additional internship credit must be used as free electives. Evaluation requirements include on-site visitations by the faculty/coordinator, consultation with the on-site supervisor, and a major progress report by the student or the presentation of a detailed oral report before the departmental internship education committee.

Prerequisites: PHYS 350; completion of 90 credits with a minimum 2.5 GPA, and approval of the internship education coordinator.

EOPT 105 Computer Interfacing in Electro-Optics

Credits: 3.00

Teaches the fundamentals of interfacing the personal computer to its physical surroundings such as electro-optics equipment. Students do graphical programming and learn to use virtual instruments in order to collect data and to control experiments. They use a program that employs graphical block diagrams that compile into machine code. Includes a lab component.

EOPT 110 Geometric Optics

Credits: 3.00

Introduces the principles and theory of light as a geometric ray and gives an elementary treatment of image formation. Topics include reflection, refraction, prisms, lenses, mirrors, pupils, stops, aberrations, optical instruments, aspherical surfaces, and optical system design and evaluation. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisites: PHYS 100, at least concurrently

EOPT 120 Wave Optics

Credits: 3.00

Provides the basic knowlege of the wave nature of light. Topics include spectral characteristics of light, propagation of light, interference, diffraction, polarization, windows, filters, beam splitters, and gratings. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisite: EOPT 110; MATH 110 or MATH 121 at least concurrently

EOPT 125 Introduction to Electronics

Credits: 4.00

Introduces basic analog and digital electronics. Emphasizes direct current (DC) circuits and networks utilizing Ohm's Law and focuses upon the use of electronic instrumentation and design using operational amplifiers as "black box" building elements. In addition, the digital component of the course covers basic digital logic and its implementation in hardware using integrated circuit-based logic gates and counters. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisites: MATH 110 or MATH 121 at least concurrently

EOPT 210 Detection and Measurement

Credits: 3.00

Covers electronic amplification, optical detectors, and the measurement of small distances using interference effects. Operational amplifiers are used to build circuits to measure the output of photon and thermal detectors. In order to accurately measure properties such as wavelengths, absorption of wavelengths, defects in lenses, prisms, and flat plates, spectrophotometers, and interferometers. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisites: EOPT 120; EOPT 125

EOPT 220 Introduction to Lasers

Credits: 3.00

Different types of incoherent light sources are discussed and investigated. The concepts of laser safety are introduced. The elements and operation of an optical power meter are covered. The energy-level diagrams and the energy-transfer processes in the active medium are discussed. The spatial and temporal properties of lasers are investigated along with other characteristics such as modes of oscillation. Some applications of lasers are investigated. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisites: EOPT 120

EOPT 240 Fiber Optics

Credits: 3.00

Covers basic concepts in fiber optics such as dispersion, attenuation, and single-mode and multimode propagation. Fiber optic test equipment such as optical time domain reflectometers and optical power meters is discussed and investigated. Covers sources, detectors, and optical amplifiers. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisite: EOPT 120

EOPT 250 High-Vacuum Technology

Credits: 3.00

Teaches how to produce and measure a vacuum. Presents the properties of gases and the concepts of fluid flow and pumping. Many different kinds of vacuum pumps are discussed in detail. The concept of measuring a vacuum is introduced through the discussion of vacuum gauges and gas analyzers. Covers the techniques of leak detection and thin film deposition. The concept of ultrahigh vacuum is touched upon. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisites: PHYS 116

EOPT 260 Industrial Applications of Lasers

Credits: 3.00

Laser power and energy measurements are made. The theory and applications of industrial lasers are covered. Material processing such as welding, cutting, and hole drilling is discussed, implemented and analyzed. The role of optics in laser machining is covered. Laser safety is emphasized. Includes a lab component.

Prerequisites: EOPT 220

SCI 101 Fundamentals of Physics

Credits: 2.50

A conceptual course in physics for Elementary Education majors only. High school physics is not a prerequisite. Class and lab presentations concentrate upon dispelling naive concepts and developing a better understanding and appreciation of the physical world. The topics of motion, heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and the nucleus are presented in context with everyday experiences. Does not fulfill the Liberal Studies requirement except for majors in Elementary Education and Early Childhood Education/PreK-Grade 6.

Prerequisites: Elementary Education major or instructor permission

SCI 105 Physical Science I

Credits: 4.00

A descriptive and conceptual course in physics for the non-Science major. High school physics is not a prerequisite. Content is designed to develop an understanding and appreciation of the physical world around us, to produce changes in attitude and background essential for our modern society, and to clarify the following topics: motion, heat, sound, light, electricity, magnetism and the structure of matter.

 

 

 

 

  • Physics Department
  • Weyandt Hall, Room 56
    975 Oakland Avenue
    Indiana, PA 15705
  • Phone: 724-357-2370
  • Fax: 724-357-3804
  • Office Hours
  • Monday through Friday
  • 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • 1:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.