What They Said

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

“At one time the theory was, you’ve got to get over it, you’ve buried them and you have to move on,” said [IUP faculty member Gordon] Thornton, a past president of the Association of Death Education and Counseling. “Now you recognize that for some people, keeping the connection is very important. You light a candle for them, you use pictures of them, you talk about them every day, and that’s not pathological.”
(“Grief counseling a growing field as our reluctance to face death diminishes,” April 20, 2004)

Washington Post:

“So many students and others revered [Rosemary] Walters that immediately following the car accident that killed her and her husband, James, they began brainstorming about how to appropriately pay tribute….Three years after the Lanham couple were killed by a drunk driver, student and alumni musicians will come together to play a song commissioned for the occasion. The premiere of Jack Stamp's ‘Strength in Weakness,’ for band, choir and orchestra, will take place tonight…Stamp was chosen to compose the piece because he knew Rosemary Walters from College Park United Methodist Church, where he turned pages for her as she played the organ 30 years ago. Normally it takes several years to get the final product of a commissioned piece, but Stamp, now a music professor and band conductor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, put the project high on his priority list.”
(“Fitting Tribute to a Beloved Teacher,” April 1, 2004)

Philadelphia Inquirer:

“Of the 64 species of wild mammals in Pennsylvania, one-fourth are in decline, said Alicia Linzey, project director and a biology professor at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Among them are the snowshoe hare, the Indiana bat, and the northern flying squirrel.”
(“Designated areas in Penna. put mammals on the map,” January 20, 2004)