What They Said

Smoky Mountain News:

“A program at Western Carolina University is working to improve support for gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgendered students and employees. Adopting a manual from Indiana University of Pennsylvania’s Safe Zone program, representatives sought to expose and critique how sexism, homophobia and anti-gay oppression affect the community, train members of the University and greater campus community to become allies, and promote related workshops, lectures and discussions.”
(“Western program builds supports for gays,” Week of May 26, 2004)

Associated Press:

“First, his mother was accused of hiring a hit man to kill her ex-boyfriend. Now, Pennsylvania authorities say 18-year-old Gregory Rowe murdered his 7-month-old daughter and the infant's teenage mother—one day before their child support hearing…Kathy Fisher, the mother of slain 17-year-old Kristin Fisher, said Rowe had the same values as his ‘horrible monster’ of a mother. Kristin and Kaylee Fisher were discovered by Kathy Fisher on May 4 in their home in Greentown, Pa., about 100 miles north of Philadelphia…Dennis Giever, chairman of Indiana University of Pennsylvania's criminology department, said parents pass on behavioral traits such as patience and empathy that make offspring less likely to commit crimes. ‘You’re essentially looking at patterns of behavior, and they had very similar patterns of behavior, from mother to son,’ Giever said, commenting on the alleged premeditation of the two sets of murders.”
(“Mom: Teen charged in killings had ‘horrible monster’ for mother,” June 8, 2004)

Charlotte (N.C.) Observer:

“Offenders who don’t get counseling are twice as likely to assault their partners again compared with those who don’t enroll in the programs, according to two studies done by Indiana University of Pennsylvania.”
(“Convicted batterers failing to get rehab,” June 30, 2004)

Boston Globe:

“There are no Clarks in the Clarks. There is singer-guitarist Scott Blasey, guitarist Robert James, bassist Greg Joseph, and drummer Dave Minarik. (All sing, too.) They became the Clarks when, in a desperate search for a name, Joseph and Minarik, working in retail while going to Indiana University of Pennsylvania, realized they’d both waited on customers named Clark in one week. Luckily, their music shows a little more imagination. They just released [an] album, Fast Moving Cars, and are at the Paradise Lounge tonight with Fastball…These fellows make upbeat rock ‘n’ roll that doesn’t veer too far from the good-time center of the rock ‘n’ roll highway.”
(“Music That Soothes the Soul” review by Jim Sullivan, August 3, 2004)

Associated Press:

“From historical markers to kitschy landmarks like a renovated coffeepot-shaped building near Bedford, the [Lincoln] highway will be commemorated with 250 exhibits along a 200-mile stretch of U.S. Route 30 between Pittsburgh and Gettysburg. Nearly 70 exhibits will be unveiled Aug. 16, and the rest will follow in the next year. ‘This is essentially an outdoor museum to highway history,’ said Kevin Patrick, a geography professor and Lincoln Highway authority from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. ‘By stretching out different components of this, it encourages people to enjoy the route exactly the way it should be enjoyed—and that’s by driving.’
(“Roadside museum offers insights to first transcontinental highway,” August 7, 2004)