Morris K. Udall Scholarship

Deadline

To be considered, a student must be nominated by their college or university.

October
Faculty representatives can register students for the online application beginning October 1

February 25, 2011
Deadline to register students for the online application

March 2, 2011
Online applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. MST (Note: institutional deadlines may be earlier. Please check with your faculty representative.)

Purpose

In 2011, the Foundation expects to award eighty scholarships of up to $5,000 and fifty honorable mentions of $350 to sophomore- and junior-level college students committed to careers related to the environment, tribal public policy, or Native American health care.

Scholarships are offered in any of three categories:

  • To students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to tribal public policy; or
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to Native health care.

The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics.

The Udall Foundation seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in Native American health care and tribal public policy. Tribal policy includes fields related to tribal sovereignty, tribal governance, tribal law, Native American education, Native American justice, natural resource management, cultural preservation and revitalization, Native American economic development, and other areas affecting Native American communities. Native American health care includes health care administration, social work, medicine, and research into health conditions affecting Native American communities.

Eligibility

To be eligible, students must meet all of the following criteria:

Be committed to a career related to the environment, OR committed to a career in tribal public policy OR Native American health care.
  • Only Native Americans and Alaska Natives are eligible to apply in tribal public policy or Native American health care.*
  • Native American students studying tribal public policy or native health do not need to demonstrate commitment to the environment.
  • Likewise, students pursuing environmentally related careers do not need to be Native American, nor do they need to demonstrate commitment to tribal public policy or Native health.
Be a matriculated sophomore- or junior-level student at a two-year or four-year accredited institution of higher education, pursuing a bachelor's or associate's degree during the 2010-2011 academic year.
  • "Sophomore" is defined as a student who has completed at least one year of full-time undergraduate study and intends at least two more years of full-time undergraduate study beginning in Fall 2011.
  • "Junior" is defined as a student who intends at least one more year of full-time undergraduate study beginning in Fall 2011.
  • Students may apply for funding in both their sophomore and junior years; third-time applicants, however, will not be eligible.
Meet the following requirements:
  • Have a college grade-point average of at least a "B" or the equivalent.
  • Be pursuing full-time study during the 2011-2012 academic year.
  • Be a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or U.S. permanent resident.

    Native American and Alaska Native students in tribal public policy or health care must submit copies of relevant enrollment forms or descent documentation (for more information, see our Frequently Asked Questions). Members of the First Nations of Canada must submit proof of U.S. permanent residency. U.S. permanent residents must submit a copy of their permanent resident ("green") card and a letter of intent to declare U.S. citizenship (First Nations are excepted). How to Apply

    For the purposes of the Scholarship Program, a Native American or Alaska Native is any individual who is:
    1. A member of an Indian tribe or band, as membership is defined by the tribe or band, including any tribe or band terminated since 1940 and any tribe recognized by the state in which the tribe or band resides;
    2. A descendant in first or second degree of a member of an Indian tribe or band, as membership is defined by the tribe or band, who can demonstrate affiliation with the tribal community according to criteria set by the Foundation;
    3. Considered by the Secretary of the Interior to be an Indian for any purpose;
    4. An Eskimo, Aleut, or other Alaska Native;
    5. A permanent U.S. resident who is a member of the First Nations of Canada.

Apply To

Committees who review these applications look for different things from candidates. These were tips given by a previous program manager for the Udall Foundation. So, be sure to keep some of these things in mind when applying:

  • Goal Statement - Make sure you are clear in what you want to say. Your statement should be solid, well-written, and focused.
  • Commitment - You should be committed to project at hand. Remember to enforce that commitment to the environment, to health care, and to tribal public policy in every question you answer. The committee is looking for people who are going to give it their all.
  • Optional Work - Answer the final question towards the end of the application that asks if there is anything else you would like to share with the review committee. This is a good place to address something that hasn't been expanded upon elsewhere in the application.
  • Essay Question - Really focus on this, and be sure to answer both parts thoroughly. Kristin Kelling, a previous program manager at the Udall Foundation, suggests "explaining and analyzing the speech or legislation for the first part. Make sure the second part integrates that speech or legislation with its impact on the student's interests, studies, and career goals. That tie-in is essential, so have the student pick a topic that relates well to his or her goals."
  • Research - Check out the website and become familiar with the Foundation before starting the application process. This can be most beneficial to the essay process because it provides links that will help (be sure to check out the link to the University of Arizona archives).

More information about the Morris K. Udall Scholarships

130 South Scott Avenue
Tucson, Arizona 85701-1922

Ph. 520.901.8500
Fax 520.670.5530

E-mail info@udall.gov