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Chemistry Department courses are listed below, courtesy of the Undergraduate Catalog.

Note: CHEM 281, Survey of Forensic Chemistry, will be changing to CHEM 105, The Forensic Chemistry of CSI, in Spring 2009.

CHEM 101 College Chemistry I

3c-2l-4cr

Basic principles and concepts of inorganic chemistry are developed from the standpoint of atomic and molecular structure with illustrative examples from descriptive chemistry. The laboratory portion of the course illustrates physical and chemical properties in a qualitative and quantitative manner. Restricted to students enrolled in the colleges of Health and Human Services and Natural Sciences and Mathematics; others by permission. Some lecture and lab sections may be restricted to Nursing, Respiratory Care, Respiratory Therapist, and Nuclear Medicine Technology majors. Some lab sections may be restricted to Nutrition and Dietetics Majors.

CHEM 102 College Chemistry II

3c-2l-4cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 101

Basic, fundamental principles and concepts of organic and biochemistry are developed. Deals primarily with structural features of organic compounds, the chemistry of functional groups, and practical examples and uses of organic compounds. The laboratory portion illustrates properties and reactions of representative organic compounds. Restricted to students enrolled in the colleges of Health and Human Services and Natural Sciences and Mathematics; others by permission. Some lecture and lab sections may be restricted to Nursing, Respiratory Care, Respiratory Therapist, and Nuclear Medicine Technology majors. Some lab sections may be restricted to Nutrition and Dietetics Majors.

CHEM 105 The Forensic Chemistry of C.S.I.

3c-0l-3cr
Prerequisite: none

The course is designed for students who would like to learn about forensic chemistry and the basic science needed to understand it. Topics will include the forensic chemistry of drugs, arson, poisons, hair, fiber, glass, fingerprints, and the methods used in forensic evidence collection, processing, and crime scene reconstruction. Also included in this course is how forensic science is portrayed on TV and in novels, movies, and computer games.

CHEM 111 General Chemistry I

3c-3l-4cr

A lecture-discussion of principles of chemistry, including theory and applications. The lab illustrates principles discussed. Topics include scientific measurements, simple definitions and concepts, the mole, stoichiometry, gas laws, electronic structure of the atom, bonding thermochemistry, and descriptive chemistry of the elements. Restricted to students enrolled in the colleges of Education and Educational Technology, Health and Human Services, and Natural Sciences and Mathematics; others by permission.

CHEM 112 General Chemistry II

3c-3l-4cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 111 or 113

A continuation of General Chemistry I. Topics discussed include the solid and liquid state, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, solubility equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and descriptive chemistry of the elements. Restricted to students enrolled in the colleges of Education and Educational Technology, Health and Human Services, and Natural Sciences and Mathematics; others by permission.

CHEM 113 Concepts in Chemistry I

3c-3l-4cr

An introductory course for Chemistry, Chemistry Education, Biochemistry, Geology, and Science of Disaster Response majors. The first half of a two semester sequence designed to give students the foundation of knowledge and laboratory techniques required to successfully complete a Chemistry degree program. Topics include atomic theory, an introduction to chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermo- chemistry, chemical bonding, and molecular geometry, transition metal complexes, polymers, and biomolecules.

CHEM 114 Concepts in Chemistry II

3c-3l-4cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 111 or 113

An introductory course for Chemistry, Chemistry Education, Biochemistry, Geology, and Science of Disaster Response majors. The second half of a two-semester sequence designed to give students the foundation of knowledge and laboratory techniques required to successfully complete a Chemistry degree program. Topics include kinetic-molecular theory of gases, the liquid and solid states, solution theory, kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, acids and bases, and electrochemistry.

CHEM 214 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry

1c-3l-2cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 112 or 114

Presents the characteristic reactions and compounds of elements from across the periodic table. For the main-group elements, both discrete molecular compounds and nonmolecular materials are discussed. For the alkali, transition and inner-transition metals, the focus is on nonmolecular species such as ionic compounds, ceramics, superconductors, and other inorganicbased materials. Also presents the solid-state structure of inorganic-based materials. Uses laboratory activities to reinforce concepts presented in lecture and to stimulate interest through discovery-based exercises.

CHEM 231 Organic Chemistry I

3c-4l-4cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 112 or 114

A study of compounds of carbon, with a special emphasis on structurereactivity relationships. Laboratory work emphasizes methods of separation and purification of organic compounds.

CHEM 232 Organic Chemistry II

3c-4l-4cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 231

A continuation of Organic Chemistry I with an introduction to spectroscopic techniques. Laboratory work emphasizes the synthesis of representative compounds.

CHEM 255 Biochemistry and Nutrition

3c-0l-3cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 102

For Nutrition and Dietetics majors. Studies chemistry and biological function of biologically active compounds with respect to nutritional requirements.

CHEM 281 Special Topics

var-1-3cr
Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content

Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate students.

CHEM 301 Introduction to Chemical Research

1c-0l-1cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 231

A discussion of current technical literature and current research problems of faculty. Lectures by outside chemists and student presentations will be included. Open to junior or senior Chemistry, Chemistry Education, and Biochemistry majors; others by permission of the chairperson.

CHEM 321 Quantitative Analysis

3c-4l-4cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 112 or 114

Theory and practice of quantitative analysis, including gravimetric and volumetric analysis; a special emphasis on perfecting laboratory techniques and application of general chemical knowledge through problem solving.

CHEM 322 Instrumental Analysis

3c-4l-4cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 341

Modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Teaches theory behind the instrument, principles of operation, interpretation of data obtained, and limitations of methods.

CHEM 323 Analytical Methods

3c-4l-4cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 112 or 114 and non-Chemistry or non-Chemistry

Education major Principles of precipitation, acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and equilibria are applied to problem solving and to laboratory determinations; instrumental methods of analysis, such as colorimetry, atomic absorption and flame emission, gas chromatography, etc.

CHEM 331 Organic Molecular Structure Determination

4c-var-3cr
Prerequisites: CHEM 231-232 (CHEM 232 may be taken concurrently)

Gives the student experience in systematic identification of various classes of organic compounds by both chemical and physical methods.

CHEM 335 Advanced Organic Chemistry

3c-0l-3cr
Prerequisites: CHEM 232 and 341

Selected topics of current interest covered. Possible topics include reaction mechanisms, molecular spectroscopy, stereochemistry, natural products, heterocyclics, polymer chemistry, and organic synthesis.

CHEM 340 Physical Chemistry for the Biological

Sciences 3c-0l-3cr
Prerequisites: MATH 122 or 225, and PHYS 112 or 132; CHEM 232

A one-semester course for Biochemistry and Biology majors. Chemical thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics; quantum mechanics; and spectroscopy especially as applied to biomechanical systems.

CHEM 341 Physical Chemistry I 4c-0l-4cr

Prerequisites: MATH 122 or 225, and PHYS 112 or 132; CHEM 112 or 114

Chemical thermodynamics with applications to solutions, phase, and chemical equilibria-kinetic theory.

CHEM 342 Physical Chemistry II

3c-0l-3cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 341

A study of solids, liquids, surfaces, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, atomic and molecular structure.

CHEM 343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I

0c-3l-1cr
Prerequisites: CHEM 321; must be taken after or concurrent with CHEM 341

Experiments illustrating application of fundamental laws to actual systems. (Writing-intensive course)

CHEM 344 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II

0c-3l-1cr
Prerequisites: CHEM 343; must be taken after or concurrent with CHEM 342

An extension of Physical Chemistry Laboratory I; experiments related to chemical kinetics, molecular spectroscopy, and other topics of physical chemistry.

CHEM 351 Biochemistry

4c-0l-4cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 231

A study of chemistry and biological functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, minerals, vitamins, and hormones.

CHEM 410 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

0c-3l-1cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 322

A laboratory course in which the techniques used in the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds are explored. Emphasizes the preparation of a wide variety of inorganic compounds and the methods by which they are identified and characterized.

CHEM 411 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

3c-0l-3cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 341

A study of advanced principles of inorganic chemistry including atomic structure, symmetry, advanced bonding theories, acids and bases, coordination chemistry, and organometallic chemistry.

CHEM 412 Advanced Structural and Synthetic Methods in Inorganic Chemistry

2c-2l-3cr
Prerequisites: CHEM 411 and either CHEM 410 or 322

Advanced techniques used in the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds are explored. In lecture, an emphasis is on the theory and application of structural and spectroscopic methods of characterization. In lab, an emphasis is on advanced methods of synthesis and structural characterization using representative examples of important classes of
inorganic compounds.

CHEM 421 Advanced Instrumental Analysis

4c-var-3cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 322

A study of modern chemical analysis, using advanced instrumental techniques; emphasis is on theory, principles of operation, capabilities, and limitations of advanced analytical truments used.

CHEM 441 Advanced Physical Chemistry

3c-0l-3cr
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHEM 342

A study of fundamental ideas of quantum and statistical mechanics, molecular structure, and other topics of current interest.

CHEM 481 Special Topics

var-1-3cr
Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content

Offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore topics not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level undergraduate students.

CHEM 482 Independent Study

var-1-3cr
Prerequisite: Prior approval through advisor, faculty member, department chairperson, dean, and Provost’s Office

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of resources.

CHEM 493 Internship in Chemistry

var-4-9cr
Prerequisites: CHEM 111 or 113, CHEM 112 or 114, and CHEM 231, 232, 321, 341, junior status, and departmental approval

Full-time involvement in an actual “on-the-job” situation in an industrial or research laboratory under the tutelage of a selected preceptor. A department faculty member will work closely with the student and preceptor and will assume responsibility for making the final evaluation and assigning a grade.

CHEM 498 Problems in Chemistry

var-1-2cr
Prerequisite: CHEM 231 and permission of chairperson

A course of supervised undergraduate research, in conjunction with a faculty member in the chemistry department.

CHEM 499 Problems in Chemistry Education

var-1sh
Prerequisite: Chemistry Education major; permission of chairperson

A course of independent study on selected problems in chemistry education, including library reading, lab work, and conferences with a chemistry education faculty member who is supervising the study.

CHEM 500 Special Studies

1-6 cr.

Intensive survey of literature in a particular area as well as individual instruction on recent advances in chemical instrumentation, methods of research, and specialized subject areas. To be arranged with instructor.

CHEM 521/* Advanced Instrumental Methods of Analysis

3 cr.

Modern instrumental analysis, including electrical, spectrophotometric, xrays, gas chromatography, and other methods. (Open to P.S.M. and M.A. candidates by permission only.) Four-hour lecture/laboratory.

CHEM 531/* Organic Molecular Structure Determination

3 cr.

Gives student experience in systematic identification of various classes of organic compounds by both chemical and physical methods. Four-hour lecture/laboratory.

CHEM 535/* Current Topics in Organic Chemistry

3 cr.

With selections to meet the needs of the students, possible topics may include reaction mechanisms, molecular spectroscopy, stereochemistry, natural products, heterocyclics, polymer chemistry, and organic synthesis.

CHEM 540/* Physical Chemistry

3 cr. (core course)

An introduction to spectroscopy and molecular structure. Lecture—three hours.

CHEM 581 Special Topics

3 cr.

CHEM 600 Seminar

1 cr.

A study of modern chemical research and research techniques. Scientific communication, including the role of the science laboratory in research. The student will present one oral report. Lecture—one hour.

CHEM 610 Inorganic Chemistry

3 cr. (core course)

Theoretical inorganic chemistry and, in particular, structure, periodicity, coordination chemistry, bonding, and chemistry of nonaqueous solvents. Lecture—three hours.

CHEM 620 Analytical Chemistry

3 cr. (core course)

Theoretical principles of analytical chemistry. Lecture—three hours.

CHEM 623 Physical and Chemical Methods of Separation

3 cr.

Application of chromatographic methods to the quantitative separation and analysis of chemical systems. Topics will include gas, column, paper and ion exchange chromatographic methods, and other methods of separation as time permits. Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—4 hours.

CHEM 630 Organic Chemistry

3 cr. (core course)

Principles of physical chemistry will be applied to the study of organic reaction mechanisms. Lecture—three hours.

CHEM 646 Biochemistry

3 cr.

Topics covering and emphasizing most recent developments in the areas of biochemistry, such as amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, enzymes, metabolism, and metabolic control. Lecture—three hours.

CHEM 681 Special Topics

3 cr.

CHEM 690 Research

1-6 cr.

Laboratory and literature investigation of student’s thesis problem done under the direction of a faculty member. Within the first 15 hours of course work, the student must schedule at least one credit of research for which the student performs the literature review and writes a research proposal.

CHEM 699 Independent Study

1-6 cr.

Available to students who seek to deepen their knowledge in some specific aspect of chemistry. The student must discuss the nature of the independent study with a faculty member having expertise in the area prior to registration. Special attention to development of new ideas and new ways of presenting scientific principles.

CHEM 795 (Previously CHEM 850) Thesis

4 cr.

For students writing the thesis. Should be scheduled for the semester in which the student plans to complete work. A committee thesis (four semester hours), for which the student’s advisor, two additional faculty members, and the dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics constitute the committee.

*Indicates dual-listed class

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